Blog   2013

2013 Year in Review

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Thank you to all of our associates, customers and communities for making the last 100 years an incredible journey. Cheers to the next 100!

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UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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The 100-Year Old Entrepreneur

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A century is a significant amount of time for anything. However, it’s an especially meaningful milestone for UMB. When you think about some of the challenges over the past 100 years: the Great Depression, world wars and most recently the Great Recession, it’s a unique feat to not only survive 100 years, but to thrive. We aren’t the only century old company, there are many more like us. So, what’s the secret to success?

It’s the story of the 100-year-old entrepreneur.

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What do I mean by that? It’s the idea that regardless of how long a business operates, the leaders must make a conscious effort to always incorporate the entrepreneur mindset in their day-to-day work. It’s the visions, strategies and practices that continue to reinvent, reset and remind an organization of who they are, what they offer, and how/why they do what they do.

There are several common values entrepreneurs bring to the table – below are a few I believe are most important.

Evolution is not optional

It sounds simple, but this can be hard for companies. As time, customers, technology and pretty much everything else change, so must elements of a business. Having the foresight and commitment to take calculated risks based on these evolving needs is critical. Entrepreneurs start a business venture because they see an opportunity for a new way to do something – a mindset existing businesses should also adopt. Whether it’s adapting delivery models, expanding or eliminating offerings, or entering new markets, continuing to evolve as a business will help you stay relevant. Fear of failure cannot be an inhibitor. We all know, the only constant is change…and that’s actually a good thing for business.

Surround yourself with the best team

We all say it, but not everyone does it. Successful entrepreneurs understand that associates are as important as their business model. They are the heartbeat of the organization. A business can have the best offering in the marketplace, but it won’t mean anything if the right people aren’t part of the team. Having people that continually evaluate, question, advise and champion the way products and services are formed and executed will determine your success. Associates are also the face of your company, so having people who are passionate about your organization and what you do is a must. We all know in a competitive market, customer service and relationships can be the differentiator. Anyone can win on price. The real question is whether you can win, and more importantly keep the business, based on service.

Ethics and Integrity

It’s the Golden Rule. It’s your moral compass. It’s your reputation and the value behind your brand. How you conduct business defines your worth as a trusted advisor, a community member and an employer.  I’ve often said, “We do what’s right, not what’s popular.” And it’s been one of the biggest contributors to our success. Having these types of guiding philosophies that are passed down generation after generation and consciously employed in the daily culture and actions of your organization will result in outstanding client relationships, quality community involvement, and loyal, engaged associates—all of which will support the longevity of your business and overall success.


Mariner is the chairman and chief executive officer of UMB Financial Corporation and UMB Bank, n.a. He joined UMB in 1997. Mr. Kemper is active in both civic and philanthropic endeavors. One of the causes he is most passionate about is the arts. He currently serves as a trustee and executive committee member for the Denver Art Museum and is a past board member for The Arts Council of Metropolitan Kansas City.



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Fiduciaries: what are they and why do you need them?

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One of the most important items in your estate planning process is naming the fiduciaries who will execute your wishes and manage your assets when needed. First, you may be wondering what exactly is a fiduciary. Very simply, a fiduciary is a third-party representative who is appointed to act on behalf of someone else.

Two of the most common fiduciaries in estate planning are the personal representative, the person who handles the assets that are included in someone’s last will and testament; and a trustee, someone who handles the assets that have been placed in a trust.

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So, why do you need a fiduciary and how do you choose the right one? Here are some things to keep in mind.

  • Carefully select a fiduciary that you trust to execute your plans.

    Handling an estate may seem like a simple process that anyone can easily manage. However, don’t underestimate both the amount of work and the expertise needed to carry out required duties.

    First, there are a variety of laws that must be navigated, including complicated probate laws. Additionally, accounting for estates and trusts can be extremely technical and require excellent record keeping and tracking. Your fiduciaries must be able to show through proper accounting that they have handled and managed the estate and its assets in an accurate, fair and unbiased manner. If you pick someone who is lacking in knowledge or organizational skills they are at risk for liability and personal fines.

    Tax planning is also a necessary expertise—it’s imperative that an estate is run in a tax-efficient manner. Fiduciaries must understand how their actions affect the estate or trust as well as the beneficiaries. This includes how assets are invested and distributed since trusts are subject to different tax rates and laws than individuals or corporations.

  • There may be disagreements.

    Secondly, you may truly believe that your family members and friends will easily work together and agree on how your assets should be handled. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case. Appointing a family member or friend frequently causes tension or distress that may not have existed before. If not handled properly, this can easily result in stress, damaged relations or, in some cases, legal action between or against your loved ones.

  • You don’t have to be wealthy to use a professional fiduciary.

    Employing a professional fiduciary is cost-effective, and something you should think about even if you do not consider yourself to be a high-net-worth individual. Your immediate reaction may be that it’s more expensive to hire a fiduciary to handle everything, rather than seeking individual counsel from different experts as needed. However, in many cases, a fiduciary’s cost will be equal to or less expensive.

At the end of the day, it’s in your best interest to carefully research your options to select the appropriate fiduciary for your own unique situation. Designating the right person to efficiently and quickly handle these details in a difficult time is truly one of the best gifts you can leave behind.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Tjaden serves as executive vice president and chief fiduciary officer. He is responsible for supervising all fiduciary activities and staff for UMB, including offices in Kansas City, St. Louis, Denver, Phoenix and Salina, as well as the Trust Company in South Dakota. Mr. Tjaden oversees Personal Trust, Custody, Foundations, Trust Legal and Business Support Services within the Private Wealth Management division. He joined UMB in 1977. Mr. Tjaden earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration and political science from Kansas State University. He also earned a Juris Doctor and a master’s in business administration from the University of Kansas. Additionally, Mr. Tjaden is a Certified Trust and Financial Advisor and a member of the Estate Planning Society, the Johnson County Bar Association and the Kansas Bar Association.



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Janet Yellen: The Next Chairperson of the Federal Reserve

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Janet who? Janet Yellen, the seemingly-unknown current vice-chairperson of the Federal Reserve(the Fed), was nominated by the President to succeed Ben Bernanke after several White House favorites were first considered. Bernanke, the current chairman of the Fed, is vacating the position he has held since 2006 at the end of January 2014.

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Yellen now awaits the Senate confirmation process, which she should easily glide through as the Republicans appeared to support her as a candidate while the President sought alternative contenders earlier in the process. She appears to have a very good track record on judging appropriate policy. Whether a dove (low rates and inflation) or a hawk (inflation a threat), what’s important is supporting the appropriate policy at the appropriate time…which she has done. She is battled-tested, having worked in key policy roles through both the Asian financial crisis in 1997and the recent global financial crisis.  She has spent most of the past two decades as a leading voice within the Fed, initially as a member of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, then as president and chief executive officer of the San Francisco Federal Reserve Board, and over the past four years as vice chairman of the Federal Reserve.

We think Yellen, like Bernanke, may view the risk of the economy becoming stuck in a low-to-moderate growth path great enough to provide ongoing risk insurance, such as delaying the tapering of quantitative easing or even, if necessary, providing additional stimulus.

Yellen is characterized by those who know her as a brilliant thinker who focuses on the human side of economics.  As vice chair of the Fed, she was credited with forming the Fed’s communication policy including the chairman’s quarterly press conference. This press conference – and communication in general – may become more critical as we transition from a period of large-scale asset purchases to one of strong “forward guidance” from the Fed. Yellen has also been a proponent of maintaining the Fed’s zero interest rate policy and continuing the Fed’s asset purchase program.

If confirmed, she will be the first women to lead the Fed.  We think she is extremely qualified and will do an exceptional job.  We don’t expect much change with respect to the current Fed policy, and neither does the market. Upon her nomination in early October, the market let out a big yawn; markets didn’t move much then and haven’t since.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


K.C. Mathews joined UMB in 2002. As executive vice president and chief investment officer, Mr. Mathews is responsible for the development, execution and oversight of UMB’s investment strategy. He is chairman of the Trust Investment, Asset Allocation and Trust Policy Committees. Mr. Mathews has more than 20 years of diverse experience in the investment industry. Prior to joining UMB, he served as vice president and manager of the portfolio management group at Bank of Oklahoma for nine years. Mr. Mathews earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Notre Dame. Mr. Mathews attended the ABA National Trust School at Northwestern University and is a Chartered Financial Analyst and member of the CFA Institute. He is past president of the Kansas City CFA Society and a past president of the Oklahoma Society of Financial Analysts.



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The art of fine art management

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Have you ever watched Antiques Roadshow? This popular public television show shares interesting stories of people happily discovering their personal treasures are actually quite valuable (or sometimes not!). Imagine learning that a famous designer of the late 1800’s made your great-grandmother’s favorite lamp or a rare piece of pottery you purchased on vacation is actually a sought-after piece. Fortunately, you don’t have to appear on Antiques Roadshow to learn the value of your own pieces or how to protect and possibly increase their value. There are other ways that are more easily accessible.

The Red Couch Marie Mason“The Red Couch”
Acrylic on canvas
Marie Mason

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Many people spend their lives collecting items that not only bring them personal enjoyment, but may significantly increase in value over time. Whether it’s fine artwork, collectibles (baseball cards), memorabilia (original Beatles or Elvis merchandise) or rare objects (antiques), you should consider these items important personal assets. Much like stocks and bonds, they are an important part of a full estate plan. But people don’t always think of them in this way.

By working with trusted professionals, you can ensure that your valuable items will get the attention they need during your lifetime and beyond.

So, what steps should you take to preserve and protect your fine art or collectibles?

  • Identify and protect

    Find a fine art management expert who can help you identify items that should receive additional attention to help preserve, and in some cases, maximize their worth. This person can also provide counsel on valuation (or appraisal), insurance, storage and other very specialized services that may be important in maintaining the object’s value.

  • Organize and document

    Proper documentation and cataloguing is critical. An experienced professional can help record the history and provide a comprehensive inventory of all pieces, an important aspect in maintaining their value. In the same way a museum inventories their collection, an expert can provide the same level of service and system support for your fine objects. Your record can then be updated as pieces are added or removed so the inventory is always complete. A detailed account of each item, including where and how each piece was acquired, can make a significant difference in value, plus, it’s a fun history lesson for you and your heirs.

  • Plan for the unexpected

    It’s important that your estate plans include details of how you want these assets distributed. Will they be gifted to a museum, a family member or a non-profit? Will these objects be liquidated so the funds can be passed on to relatives, loved ones or charitable organizations? Who will you trust to handle the actual distribution? These processes can be complicated and confusing. Your fine art management expert can help address and carry out these plans.

It’s never too early to get started on protecting your valued unique assets. Owners have much to gain by educating themselves about the care and protection of their personal treasures. Establishing a thoughtful, well-planned legacy ensures beloved items will be expertly managed both now and in the future.

 Flaming Tulip Janet Kummerlein“Flaming Tulip”
Acrylic on canvas
Janet Kummerlein

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Jan Leonard is senior vice president and managing director for charitable trusts, private foundations and fine art services. She joined UMB in 2003 and has more than 25 years of experience in the management of private and public organizations. Leonard earned a bachelor’s degree from Arkansas Tech University and a master’s degree in business administration from Ottawa University in Ottawa, Kan. She is also a graduate of the Cannon School of Foundation Management.



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Join the movement: National Cyber Security Awareness Month

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In a world where our thirst for computers, smartphones, gadgets and Wi-Fi seems to have no limits, cyber security has become more important than ever. At home, at work and at school, our growing dependence on technology, coupled with increasing threats to our online safety and privacy, demands greater security in our online world.

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At UMB, we’re proud to take strides towards a safer, more secure cyberspace. In doing so, UMB has joined the National Cyber Security Alliance, Anti-Phishing Working Group and Department of Homeland Security in support of National Cyber Security Awareness Month in October. The Stop.Think.Connect. campaign was launched in 2010 as a national public awareness campaign aimed at increasing the understanding of cyber threats and empowering the American public to be safer and more secure online. Consider it a neighborhood watch for your computer. However, just like security in your neighborhood, this campaign can only be successful when people get involved.

Through this national campaign, UMB has teamed with public and private sector resources as well as the U.S. federal government to help improve cyber security. According to the Stop.Think.Connect. campaign, they strive to:

  • Increase and reinforce awareness of cyber security, including associated risks and threats, and provide solutions for increasing cyber security.
  • Communicate approaches and strategies for the public to keep themselves, their families and their communities safer online.
  • Engage the public, the private sector, and state and local governments in our nation’s effort to improve cyber security.

Cyber security is a shared responsibility. I invite you to join UMB in the cyber security movement during National Cyber Security Awareness Month. Do your part by visiting umb.com and the Stop.Think.Connect. resource page to learn more about how to protect yourself online and help make cyberspace a safer place for all cyber citizens.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Internal Fraud: How to protect your company

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You don’t want to believe it. But the numbers just aren’t adding up. You want to trust the people who work for you, but eventually you have to come to terms with the fact that someone in your company is stealing money. Not only does it hurt your business, but it’s often a heartbreaking realization for you as a manager or owner.

It’s not always easy to figure out who is the culprit, but there are steps you can take to detect and hopefully prevent fraud within your company.

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Dual control and separation of duties

Understand who is in charge of what financial responsibilities and make sure there are no gaps. Create a system of checks and balances so that the same person who is running payables (bills, invoices, expense reports) isn’t the same person who is reconciling the accounts (balancing the company checkbook, so to speak).

It’s also a good idea for business owners to review financial statements on a weekly or monthly basis.

Automated fraud detection

Consider implementing Positive Pay. This automated fraud detection tool is offered by most banks. It’s a relatively simple process. Your company issues checks every month and you send the bank a list of all those checks, including check numbers, amounts and payees. The bank makes sure the checks match up as each one clears. This eliminates any fraudulent or altered checks. Automated fraud detection is a great solution for companies as long as they already have dual controls in place.

Anonymous tip line

Businesses should also consider setting up an anonymous fraud tip line. Internal fraud is most often detected by a tip from another associate. As a business owner or manager, you can’t know everything that’s going on in your company. Giving your associates an anonymous way to notify you is a simple, effective way to detect internal fraud.

Other processes and procedures to consider:

  • Reputable third-party audits
  • Periodic reviews of policies, procedures and controls
  • Diversity of associates’ job functions, including rotation of job duties at times
  • Periodic spot checks of your account payables/receivables, payroll, etc.

Don’t think it will happen to you? Keep this in mind. 61 percent of financial professionals reported that their organization experienced attempted or actual payments fraud in 2012. And 26 percent of fraud is committed by an organization’s own associates (Source: Association for Financial Professionals). Even though you want to assume the best from your associates, you should have systems in place to ensure that you don’t become another internal fraud statistic.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Is your affinity program still benefiting your organization or non-profit?

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Park University Affinity Card (CardPartner from UMB)RFPs, grant proposals, annual fundraiser dinners, donation drives. If you work for a non-profit or professional association, you’re always searching for new, creative ways to raise funds. Affinity credit card programs are one way to do this by helping to raise awareness and donations with each new account.

 

For organizations big or small, here are five tips to help begin, migrate or simply reevaluate affinity programs and financial partners.

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Evaluate the rewards program

Some affinity programs pay partnering organizations for new accounts, give them a percentage of monthly charge volume and/or cut them a percentage off balance transfers. Some even reward supporters and members with points, miles or cash back.

But some rewards programs may not actually benefit the organization or the cardholder. Some issuers offer rich rewards to the group, but fund the program through the cardholders (higher rates and pricing). And some rewards have a short shelf life, with points that expire in a year.

Compare affinity programs to learn what the rewards are, who gets them, and most importantly, who pays for them.

Know the terms

Affinity card issuers see value in reaching a particular customer base, but they also have to make money on affinity card programs. Understand where that revenue is coming from—especially if it’s coming from your supporters.

Ask these questions:

  • What are the rates and fees?
  • Does the lender charge cardholders extra for personalization?
  • Are there hidden charges that lessen the value for your organization and/or its supporters?

Consider the marketing support

Traditionally, affinity card issuers have controlled the marketing, using direct mail as their primary, if not only, tool to communicate about the affinity program. With social media, the toolkit has expanded and organizations are gaining control and customization of how they market to supporters and members.

Ask these questions:

  • Does the issuer provide tools to support marketing efforts beyond direct mail?
  • Do you have to wait for bank approval of marketing messages or can you insert pre-approved copy in a newsletter or share it on social media?
  • Does the program give your non-profit the flexibility to send messages on your own timeline?

Control of your supporter list

Many lenders will ask you for direct access to your organization’s supporters and for the control over the marketing messages and timing. They do this so they can cross-market other financial products and services when they issue your affinity card. You’ll have to decide whether you want to give up that control.

Check references and reputation

When entering an affinity program, issuers not only get access to your organization’s database—they also get an implied endorsement.

Choose a banking partner carefully. Talk with current affinity partners. Weigh the bank’s reputation among other non-profits. Check their asset quality, capital adequacy, profitability and loan growth; all factors that indicate the bank’s strength, stability and economic responsibility. Based on your research, select a bank that shares your values and will become a long-term partner.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Your culture drives innovation

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Mike Hagedorn is back to expand on the idea of company culture. This time, he highlights the importance of allowing your culture to drive innovation.

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Mr. Hagedorn is president and chief executive officer of UMB Bank and vice chairman of UMB Financial Corporation. Prior to this role, Hagedorn served as chief financial officer and chief administrative officer of UMB Financial Corporation. He joined UMB in March 2005.



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Federal Reserve Exit Plan

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UMB Bank’s Chief Investment Officer KC Mathews and his team recently gathered for a round table discussion regarding the Federal Reserve’s exit plan. The Fed’s decision not to begin tapering the stimulus was a largely unanticipated move for the financial markets. As explained in detail during this podcast, the Fed based this decision on data correlated with employment, inflation, the debt ceiling and housing recovery.

Learn what this latest move means for investors.

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UMB Investment Management is a division within UMB Bank, n.a. that manages active portfolios for employee benefit plans, endowments and foundations, fiduciary accounts and individuals. UMB Financial Services, Inc.*  is a wholly owned subsidiary of UMB Bank, n.a. UMB Bank, n.a., is an affiliate within the UMB Financial Corporation.

This content is provided for informational purposes only and contains no investment advice or recommendations to buy or sell any specific securities. Statements in this report are based on the opinions of UMB Investment Management and the information available at the time this report was published.

All opinions represent our judgments as of the date of this report and are subject to change at any time without notice. You should not use this report as a substitute for your own judgment, and you should consult professional advisors before making any tax, legal, financial planning or investment decisions. This report contains no investment recommendations and you should not interpret the statements in this report as investment, tax, legal, or financial planning advice. UMB Investment Management obtained information used in this report from third-party sources it believes to be reliable, but this information is not necessarily comprehensive and UMB Investment Management does not guarantee that it is accurate.

All investments involve risk, including the possible loss of principal. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Neither UMB Investment Management nor its affiliates, directors, officers, employees or agents accepts any liability for any loss or damage arising out of your use of all or any part of this report.

“UMB” – Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off. Copyright © 2012. UMB Financial Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

*Investment Products Offered Through UMB Financial Services, Inc

Member FINRA, SIPC

NOT FDIC INSURED/ NO BANK GUARANTEE/ MAY LOSE VALUE


K.C. Mathews joined UMB in 2002. As executive vice president and chief investment officer, Mr. Mathews is responsible for the development, execution and oversight of UMB’s investment strategy. He is chairman of the Trust Investment, Asset Allocation and Trust Policy Committees. Mr. Mathews has more than 20 years of diverse experience in the investment industry. Prior to joining UMB, he served as vice president and manager of the portfolio management group at Bank of Oklahoma for nine years. Mr. Mathews earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Notre Dame. Mr. Mathews attended the ABA National Trust School at Northwestern University and is a Chartered Financial Analyst and member of the CFA Institute. He is past president of the Kansas City CFA Society and a past president of the Oklahoma Society of Financial Analysts.



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