Blog   2015

Meet the Leadership Series: Maureen Quill (UMB Fund Services Chief Operating Officer)

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Q&A with Maureen

Get to know UMB’s leadership a little better. Nearly 20 years ago, Maureen Quill joined UMB Fund Services which just celebrated its 25th anniversary and is consistently named one of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel’s Top Places to Work. She was recently featured in Milwaukee Business Journal’s Women of Influence series.
UMB Fund Services Maureen Quill

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Tell us about yourself
I was born and raised in Dubuque, Iowa.  I went to Saint Mary’s College in Notre Dame, Indiana. I graduated with a Bachelors of Business Administration degree with a concentration in management and finance. I met my husband, Mike, on a blind date at the end of my freshman year. Mike is from the Chicago area, but he transferred to Notre Dame from Loras College which is located in Dubuque. My family and extended family are Notre Dame fans (fanatics may be a better description) and many members of my family graduated from Loras – destiny seemed to play a hand in our meeting! We married soon after college.

My first job was working in the Children’s Room of the public library in Dubuque. I worked there for two and a half years during high school and loved it. As an avid reader, the library was the perfect fit for me.  My first job out of college was as a call center representative at a mutual fund company.

I worked for that mutual fund company in Chicago for five years, in Kansas City for almost six years and in Milwaukee for a year. Then I worked for Sunstone for five years before UMB acquired Sunstone in 2001. I have spent my entire 30 year career in back office operations and management.

What about your past shaped who you are today?
Maureen Quill - UMB Fund Services
My parents were both ahead of their time. My mother worked full time as an ophthalmologist technician and my father was an accountant for Deere & Co. My mom loved her work and didn’t retire until age 75. My dad was always very supportive of her career. They set a good example of marriage being an equal partnership for my siblings and me. My parents infused strong moral and ethical values and expected us to get a good education and contribute to our communities. They encouraged my siblings and me to work hard and accomplish much.

Tell us about your family.
Maureen Quill with husband Mike
My husband Mike and I will be married 30 years in December.  Mike is a marketing consultant for small to mid-size manufacturing businesses. We have four children. Mitchell is 25 and in his last year of chiropractic school. Our triplets are 20. Our son Murphy is a sophomore at Marquette. Our daughter Mairead is at home with us, and our daughter Maiti is a sophomore at Saint Mary’s College, Notre Dame.
Maureen Quill and family
What makes a Chief Operating Officer great?
A COO’s job is to make sure that your team has the tools, training and support needed to successfully provide the unparalleled customer experience to our clients all the while keeping an eye on the bottom line.

What are your favorite hobbies?
My favorite hobbies are spending time with my family, reading, movies and cooking.

Where is your favorite place to travel?
I like to go to different places but water, mountains, hiking and history are common themes.

What are your favorite ways to spend a weekend?
My favorite are fall football weekends at Notre Dame. We go to three or four games a year, and family and friends are always part of the festivities.

Tell us about your team at UMB Fund Services.
There are seven members of my immediate team including me. Four of us have new roles within the last nine months!  This has been a year of stretch assignments and change but all for the good. My team has an average of seven years with UMB Fund Services and more than 25 years in the industry.

UMB Fund Services has $202.7 billion in assets under administration. We have more than 200 clients and provide fund accounting, fund administration, transfer agency, distribution services, custody and cash management for pooled investments such as mutual funds, hedge funds, alternative investments, collective trusts, etc.

We have more than 400 employees located in Milwaukee, Wisc., Ogden, Utah, Chadds Ford, Penn. and Kansas City, Mo.

My team all has the same focus: great customer service to our clients, our associates and to each other. We work to solve problems as a team, we are collaborative, all ideas are open to discussion, and we are focused on finding a way to say YES to our clients – getting to the right solution for the client and for UMB Fund Services.

What is the greatest challenge facing the industry right now?
There are two things that come to mind. The first is regulation which is constantly changing and challenging to us, our clients and our technology. The second is our growth. Hiring, training and retaining the right people to service our clients and grow with UMB Fund Services is a challenge.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Maureen Quill is Chief Operating Officer for UMB Fund Services. She is responsible for overseeing transfer agency, fund accounting and administrations, tax, distribution, alternative investments, technology and client services. She joined UMB Fund Services in March, 1996 and has 30 years of experience in the financial services industry.



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Best time to buy

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You may have heard that December 26 is the best day to buy Christmas decorations or February 15 is when to nab the cheapest candy. But what about EVERYTHING else that you buy?

We’ve been sharing “Buy The Way” wisdom for the past year on our Facebook page. In case you missed a few, we have a year-long recap of the best purchase to make every month.Buy the Way Infographic

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Welcome Marquette Financial Companies

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Chairman and CEO Mariner Kemper welcomes recently acquired Marquette Financial Companies.

 

 

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Mariner is the chairman and chief executive officer of UMB Financial Corporation and UMB Bank, n.a. He joined UMB in 1997. Mr. Kemper is active in both civic and philanthropic endeavors. One of the causes he is most passionate about is the arts. He currently serves as a trustee and executive committee member for the Denver Art Museum and is a past board member for The Arts Council of Metropolitan Kansas City.



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Strength of the U.S. Dollar

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Our Chief Investment Officer answers your questions about the strengthening U.S. dollar:

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The Positive Side of a Strong Dollar?
Throughout the past few quarters, the strengthening U.S. dollar has been gaining a lot of investors’ attention. An appreciating dollar can be both a blessing and a curse. I’ve noticed that much of the news has focused on the negative impacts of a strong dollar. Many corporate CEOs have cited the strength of the dollar as a headwind to their earnings growth. Today I will spend a few minutes on a different perspective: the positive side of a strong dollar.

What drives the U.S. Dollar?
The value of the dollar is a function of relative economic strength. So it’s not just about the Federal Reserve action or domestic economic growth, it’s also is a function of global growth. I believe the global economy is the primary driver of the dollar’s recent strength. Historically, faster-growing economies have rising currencies due to capital inflows. A strong dollar has been associated with slower global economic growth, because the dollar remains the reserve currency.

Pros and Cons?
Even though most of the headlines cite a strong dollar as a negative, there are some positive effects.

  • Typically with a strong dollar comes lower commodity prices. This is positive for the consumer, as energy costs decline.  And businesses benefit if commodities are an input variable.
  • The United States is a net importer; we import more goods than we export. Less expensive imported goods and services will increase consumer confidence and spending. Businesses buying imported raw materials or components may increase their margins or pass on savings to consumers.

What does a strong dollar mean to the U.S. economy and markets?
A strong dollar will transfer demand from the U.S. economy to economies around the world. This will negatively impact some industries, where exports represent a significant portion of their business, such as industrial conglomerates. However, other industries, focused on the domestic consumer, will benefit.

Given our forecast of an improving global economy, whether it’s actual green shoots of economic growth in Europe, or the hope of economic stimulus in China, I believe we’ll see the dollar stabilize for the remainder of the year.

I don’t believe a strong dollar will derail our market forecast.  Historically domestic equity markets have performed well in periods of both a strong or weak dollar. The message here is the dollar is not the primary driver of stock prices and I would expect the S&P 500 to post returns in the 7-10 percent range in 2015.


K.C. Mathews joined UMB in 2002. As executive vice president and chief investment officer, Mr. Mathews is responsible for the development, execution and oversight of UMB’s investment strategy. He is chairman of the Trust Investment, Asset Allocation and Trust Policy Committees. Mr. Mathews has more than 20 years of diverse experience in the investment industry. Prior to joining UMB, he served as vice president and manager of the portfolio management group at Bank of Oklahoma for nine years. Mr. Mathews earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Notre Dame. Mr. Mathews attended the ABA National Trust School at Northwestern University and is a Chartered Financial Analyst and member of the CFA Institute. He is past president of the Kansas City CFA Society and a past president of the Oklahoma Society of Financial Analysts.



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First Quarter 2015 Earnings Explained

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We recently released our First Quarter 2015 earnings. Our CFO, Brian Walker, took a moment to explain where we faced headwinds as well as the positive aspects of the last quarter.


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UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Credit Card Debt vs. Emergency Funds

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You probably already realize the importance of keeping an emergency fund for unforeseen events such as auto repairs or health issues. However, actually saving for the unexpected can be a challenge. By not planning, you can put yourself at risk for financial disaster.

A recent poll from Bankrate revealed 24 percent of Americans have more credit card debt than they have in their emergency savings. Most people, 58 percent, who don’t struggle with credit card debt still fall short when it comes to having a strong emergency fund.

emergency savings vs. credit card debt

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Greg McBride, Chief Financial Analyst at Bankrate, can’t stress enough the poor situation consumers are putting themselves into. “These numbers mean that three out of every eight Americans are teetering on the edge of financial disaster,” says McBride.

How to manage credit card debt

While there isn’t one definitive way to erase credit card debt in a hurry, below are a few helpful tips to expedite the process.

  1. Tackle high interest debt first
    It may be easier for you to stick with a debt payoff goal if you attack the card with the lowest balance. However, most financial experts agree that the best practice is to pay down the balance on the highest interest card first.
  2. Double or triple payments
    Consider doubling or tripling your monthly payments, or apply tax refunds towards outstanding balances. The faster you can tackle your highest interest card, the sooner you will reach a debt-free lifestyle.
  3. Stick with your plan
    When faced with high debt, it is critical to track and budget expenses to monitor progress and keep spending habits under control. Once the highest-interest card reaches a balance of zero, it’s time to move on to the next highest interest card.
  4. Build an emergency savings
    Building an emergency fund is just as important as getting debt under control. Tuck away money each month and set aside for emergencies only. Do this even if it means paying less on your debt payments. Most experts agree that a healthy emergency fund equals at least six months of living expenses.

Getting credit card debt under control requires excellent planning, dedication and patience. Once goals are met, it is important to keep moving forward with healthy spending and savings habits.  Being financially prepared for life’s unexpected events is smart. Having peace of mind is priceless.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Tis’ the Season for Tax Fraud

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IRS tax refund scam tips

It’s tax time. As you prepare your taxes or eagerly await any refunds, it’s also time to be aware of tax scams. These scams include phishing emails, texts or phone calls that may warn of a delay with your return, promise a bigger refund or offer you a “helpful downloadable document.” These scams are designed to steal your refund, bank account information or identity by compelling you to provide your private information to the scammer.

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The IRS estimates that it paid $5.2 billion in fraudulent refunds as a result of identity theft last year. This year, in light of recent data breaches, individuals are urged to be especially careful. New scams offer credit monitoring services due to a breach or claim to be from popular tax software providers. The IRS has provided a list of The Dirty Dozen Tax Scams for 2015 to help keep us up to date on the latest scams.

In addition, be particularly aware of common tax season phishing emails like these:

  • You’re owed a refund and need to forward your bank account information for the refund deposit. The IRS does not initiate taxpayer communications through email or social media to request personal or financial information. If you receive an unsolicited email claiming to be from the IRS, send it to phishing@irs.gov.
  • Exciting offers or refunds for participating in an “IRS Survey.” This fake survey is actually used to acquire private and confidential information that is used to steal your identity.
  • Threats of fines or jail time for not making an immediate payment, or responding to the email. If you receive an intimidating email like this and even believe you might owe on taxes, contact your local IRS office and report the threatening email.
  • Documents or tools for tax preparation (e.g. “new changes in the tax law,” a tax calculator, etc.). Those “helpful” documents mentioned earlier may, in fact, be malicious files intended to infect your computer. Remember not all unsolicited email is legitimate. If you need current tax information, go to the IRS website or consult with a tax professional.

Scams don’t stop with phishing emails. Here are some helpful tips if you get calls or texts from someone pretending to be from the IRS:

  • If you know you owe taxes or think you might owe, call the IRS at 800-829-1040.
  • If you know you don’t owe taxes or have no reason to believe that you do, report the incident to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) at 1.800.366.4484 or at gov.
  • If phone scammers target you, also contact the Federal Trade Commission. Use their FTC Complaint Assistantto report the scam, and include “IRS Telephone Scam” to the comments of your complaint.

Remember, identity theft doesn’t stop at tax season so exercise your “spidey sense” with any email, unsolicited text or call asking for your personal information.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Estate planning and how to avoid probate

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probate and wills

In a recent blog post, we discussed what might happen if you pass away without a will and what might happen with a will. When you pass away owning property in your sole name (regardless of if you have a will or not), your assets might need to go through probate in order for your heirs to inherit your property. Having a will does not avoid probate—it just determines who will receive your property. If you die owning property in your sole name without a will, your estate still passes through probate—but who receives your property will typically be determined under the laws of the state where your primary residence is at your date of death (the “intestacy laws”).

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Probate is a court process to provide for an organized way of winding up a deceased person’s affairs. During this process, a personal representative or executor is appointed by the Probate Court to supervise the collection of your probate assets, payment of your final bills and taxes, and distribution of your assets according to either your will or the intestacy laws. This may or may not be what you intend and might be more expensive than if you made other plans in advance.

Avoiding Probate

There are ways to distribute your property at your death according to your wishes without going through probate. While the techniques might vary from state to state, these typically include:

  • titling property jointly with another (“joint tenants with rights of survivorship”)
  • creating a beneficiary deed for real estate
  • adding a “transfer on death” or “pay on death” designation to assets, such as bank or investment accounts, or by beneficiary designation for assets such as your retirement plan, IRA or life insurance
  • creating a “revocable” or “living” trust and retitling your assets in the name of your trust

The trustee holds the legal title to the property owned in the revocable trust, not you as owner. The trust property is held by the trustee for your benefit during your lifetime.  You can choose to serve as your own trustee as long as you are able. At your death, the property held in the trust is distributed by the successor trustee of the trust to those family members, friends or charities you name in your trust agreement, similar to the instructions you can leave in your will.

A Living Trust

There are many advantages to creating a living trust:

  • Control: You can be your own trustee during your lifetime and then you name a successor trustee (such as a bank) to serve after you cannot or do not wish to serve.
  • Flexibility: You can typically change the terms of the trust at any time while you are living. If you become disabled, your successor trustee can step in and pay your bills, manage your investments and allow you to avoid “living probate” where otherwise a court appointed conservator might be needed to manage your affairs. You can create trusts for your minor children or grandchildren to be created after your death, hold assets in further trust for disabled or disadvantaged beneficiaries and even create trusts for charities.
  • Privacy: The terms of the trust and its assets and values are typically private, unlike a probate proceeding, which is a public matter where your will (if any) and list of assets are filed with the court and open to inspection by anyone.

Your living trust would be part of your overall estate plan, which would likely include a “pour over will” (just in case assets weren’t retitled into your trust’s name at your death), powers of attorney for financial and healthcare decisions and a living will.

 

Be sure to consult with an experienced estate planning attorney to discuss what estate plan is right for you under the circumstances.  We also recommend discussing your options with a wealth advisor who can assist you with your financial goals, working together with your attorney and other trusted advisors.

 

 

UMB is not providing you with any legal or tax advice.  You need to consult with your own legal and tax advisors to determine what estate plan is best for you and how the laws of the state governing your estate might affect you given your specific circumstances.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Teson is a Senior Vice President and Private Wealth Management’s Senior Legal Counsel at UMB Bank. She is responsible for managing Private Wealth Management’s Legal, Fiduciary Tax and Real Estate and Unique Asset teams. She joined UMB in 1992 and has been a licensed attorney for 32 years. She is also a Certified Financial Planner.



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How to finance your dental practice: the most important questions to ask

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As a dental professional, you’ve probably spent at least eight years in school preparing for your career (12 to 14 if you are a dental surgeon). After that, your focus will be on growing your new practice by building your patient panels and providing quality dental care to the community you serve.

dental practice financing

But what’s next? There are questions you need to ask yourself as soon as you open a practice:

  • Does your practice need remodeling or construction?
  • Do you see yourself bringing on a new partner at some point?
  • And most importantly, are you adequately planning for your retirement?
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As we work with dental practitioners, we’ve noticed a trend within this profession. A lack of strategic borrowing to pay for their practice’s expenses is a leading cause that prevents dental practitioners from retiring when and how they want. Only around 8 percent of dentists are able to retire and maintain the lifestyle they had during their working days.

Dental practitioners face many challenges in today’s market. Those challenges are further motivation to properly manage your funds. An important aspect of your finances is considering the best borrowing practices for your office. Some questions to consider when thinking about a loan for your dental practice:

What are your goals for your practice?
Determine where you see your practice over time. Figure out how quickly you want to grow your practice or if you have aspirations to open multiple locations. Identify a plan and partner with industry professionals who will help you achieve your ultimate objectives. Then discuss with your banking partner what financing structure will help – not hinder – this plan.

Are you borrowing with the best interest of your practice in mind?
Ask your banking partner to explain all loan options so you can align the loan structure to the best interest of the practice.  For example, some loans have a balloon payment at the end, which could require you to pay additional interest. The money you might have to pay in additional interest could be used instead to help expand the practice or could be committed to your retirement.

What are your ramp-up and wind-down strategies?
In addition to determining the long-term growth of your practice (ramp-up), you will also need to eventually consider succession and retirement strategies (wind-down). Have you considered hiring an associate to purchase your practice as a component of your exit strategy? Have you engaged a CPA firm to complete an evaluation of your practice? These are potential issues to consider as part of a succession plan.

Every practice is unique and you might even find that long-term goals change over time. Start planning early and understand what financing options are paramount for your practice. Find a banking partner who will help you determine the best loan options for your practice and your eventual retirement and succession plans.

For more financial advice, take a look at my video on Business Banking for Dentists.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.

 


Dave Bauer is a Vice President / Region Manager for UMB Business Banking. He is responsible for leading the Business Banking teams in the St. Louis and Oklahoma City regions. He joined UMB in 2011 and has eight years of experience in the financial services industry.



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UMB Insights: Being Bankable

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What does a bank look for when you’re applying for a small business loan? Here are some insights from a lender’s perspective.

  • Cash flow
  • Liquidity
  • Collateral
  • Character

To learn more about small business loans and SBA loans, check out more on the blog.

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Dominic is a executive vice president for the Business Banking division at UMB. He joined UMB in 2013 and has more than 20 years of experience in the financial services industry.



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