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The Evil Airline Phishing Attack

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Imagine clicking on an attachment in an email confirmation for an online purchase or hotel reservation and being greeted by an urgent pop-up that reads, “A virus has been detected due to suspicious activity. Click here to run a diagnostic on your computer hard drive.” Seems like good advice, right? Before clicking OK, you might want to learn more about a new email phishing scam.

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Known as the evil airline phishing attack, this scam is a two-wave social engineering scam that attempts to take over your computer and steal sensitive personal information—or both— potentially leading to identity theft or damage to your computer. What makes this especially alarming is that recent research says this scam is successful about 90 percent of the time‡.

The scam targets individuals who frequently book travel or shop online and are familiar with receiving email confirmations on purchases or bookings. Like other phishing scams, cybercriminals research online and offline before sending these authentic looking emails. The subject line will look something like this:

When the victim receives the email, the two-wave phishing attack begins:

  • First wave: Opening the message signals to the cybercriminal that the email address is authentic and has been received by a real person.
  • Second wave: Inside the email is an authentic-looking attachment such as a .pdf or .docx file. This file is masquerading as a travel confirmation or purchase receipt with malware‡ embedded in it. If the attachment is opened, the malware springs into action impacting your data and computer.

The goal of these cybercriminals is to:

  • Trick you into clicking links and opening attachments which can secretly infect your computer or device
  • Access and steal your information (e.g. usernames, passwords, credit card numbers, etc.)
  • Make transactions, file fraudulent tax returns, use you or your children’s identity, share sensitive medical data with other hackers and a variety of other activities

How can you help protect yourself?

  • First defense: Desktops, laptops, tablets and even mobile devices are at risk of this attack. Install antivirus protection on your electronic devices (including tablets and mobile phones) and keep your hardware and software updated.
  • Second defense: Never click on links or attachments in emails you aren’t expecting. If something looks “phishy,” it probably is. If you have questions or concerns about any electronic communication, go to the company’s website to confirm details or contact them directly.
  • Final defense: Communicate with your coworkers, friends and family. One of the best ways to keep from falling victim is to ask questions, open dialogue and stay informed.

For more information to stay cyber aware, visit UMB’s Security and Privacy page.

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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7 Tips to Prevent Tax ID Fraud

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As the 2017 tax season gets underway, it’s a good idea to take extra precaution to prevent exposure to tax fraud. As we saw in 2016, criminals are using new and innovative methods to try to gain your trust or scare you into lowering your defenses and making a costly mistake. These tactics have continued‡ into 2017.

Tax identity fraud takes place when a criminal files a false tax return using a stolen Social Security number in order to fraudulently claim a refund. Identity thieves generally file false claims early in the year and victims are unaware until they file a return and learn one has already been filed in their name.

To help prevent tax ID fraud, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) ‡ and Internal Revenue Service (IRS) ‡ offer the following tips:

  • File early – File your tax return as soon as you have all of your documentation giving criminals less time to use your information to file a false return.
  • File on a protected Wi-Fi network – If you’re using an online service to file your return, be sure you’re connected to a password-protected personal network. Avoid using public networks like a Wi-Fi hotspot at a coffee shop.
  • Use a secure mailbox. If you’re filing by mail, mail your tax return at the post office or an official postal box instead of your mailbox at home. Some criminals look for completed tax return forms in home mailboxes during tax season.
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  • Find a tax preparer you trust. If you’re planning to hire someone to do your taxes‡, get recommendations and research a tax preparer thoroughly before handing over all of your financial information.
  • Shred what you don’t need. Once you’ve completed your tax return, shred the sensitive documents that you no longer need and safely file away the ones you do.
  • Beware of phishing scams by email, text or phone. Scammers may try to solicit sensitive information by impersonating the IRS‡. Know that the IRS will not contact you by email, text or social media. If the IRS needs information, they will contact you by mail first.
  • Keep an eye out for missing mail. Fraudsters look for W-2s, tax refunds or other mail containing your financial information. If you don’t receive your W-2s, and your employer indicates they’ve been mailed, or it looks like it has been previously opened upon delivery, contact the IRS immediately‡.

If you believe you’re a victim of tax identity theft or if the IRS denies your tax return because one has previously been filed under your name, you should:

  • Alert the IRS Identity Protection Specialized Unit at 1-800-908-4490
  • Respond immediately to any mailed IRS notice and complete IRS Form 14039‡, Identity Theft Affidavit
  • Contact your bank immediately, to determine if any accounts have been opened without your permission or if your current accounts have been tampered with
  • Contact the three major credit bureaus to place a fraud alert on your credit records:
  • Continue to pay your taxes and file your tax return, even if you must do so by paper

More information about tax identity theft is available from the FTC at ftc.gov/taxidtheft‡ and the IRS at irs.gov/identitytheft‡. To learn more ways to keep yourself protected online, visit UMB’s Security & Privacy page.

Content adapted from the American Bankers Association (ABA).

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Focus Items for Small Business Owners

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In December, the NFIB Small Business Optimism Index‡ had its highest reading in 12 years. In the report seven of the 10 index components rose, including small business owners expecting better business conditions and higher sales.

Optimism is currently at a high point allowing for owners to focus on their next big idea, their bottom line and how they can make things better for their employees. Their bankers should be thinking about those things, too.

If you’re a small business owner, make sure you’re talking with your financial partner about these business-critical items as you venture into 2017 and beyond.

Top Talent Identification and Retention
Companies requiring vocational talent can face challenges finding the right type of employee. As businesses look to expand, growth can be difficult without a sound workforce and could potentially force companies to outsource to other cities or move operations entirely.

As part of their talent acquisition and retention efforts, small businesses should ensure they are offering solid compensation and benefits to build and retain a strong workforce.

Business Growth
With an ultimate goal of growing their company, small businesses need to evaluate what other potential clients exist and if there are new segments where they can introduce their product or service.

Companies that did not survive the 2008 economic downturn left behind certain voids that need to be filled. Existing companies should evaluate this as an opportunity to expand to a new business target.

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Employee compensation and benefits
Currently, there are two big issues that could pose a threat to small businesses: the minimum wage discussion and health care. If minimum wage increases, many businesses will face challenges with revenue and cash flow, particularly if they employ lower-wage workers. With no offsetting revenue increase, this would affect a company’s cash flow and could create unprecedented challenges within the business.

The other topic of note for business owners is healthcare. The rules and regulations of the Affordable Care Act may change with the current administration discussing extensive healthcare reform. This could mean an extra expense without incurring any additional revenue for small businesses.

Fraud and Protection
Fraud continues to be a top concern among business owners, and the latest statistics prove it is a legitimate fear. In the 2016 Association for Financial Professionals Payments Fraud and Control survey, 62 percent of companies were subject to fraud during the survey period, and wire fraud has nearly doubled from 14 percent to 27 percent.

The truth is, businesses can plug one gap and another one opens up somewhere else. The key is to stay vigilant with your employees, train them and understand the latest tactics that are being used to commit fraud.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Dominic is a executive vice president for the Business Banking division at UMB. He joined UMB in 2013 and has more than 20 years of experience in the financial services industry.



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Associate fraud: who they are and why they do it

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We shared this information with you a couple years ago, and unfortunately are finding that fraud remains a hot topic. So here is a refresher on how to detect and avoid internal fraud. Be sure to check out our other blog posts on the topic of fraud.

 

He looks like a typical associate. She could be a 20-something or a person in her fifties. He could be the person you eat lunch with every day. The truth is that you can’t pick out this person from the crowd. She is committing associate or internal fraud in your company and doesn’t look any different from the rest of your co-workers. He makes sure he blends in.

So what should you look for if you suspect one of your associates is committing fraud?

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What to look for

  • A disgruntled associate who is vocal about their unhappiness with the company. They often use this as an excuse to commit fraud.
  • An overly enthusiastic associate who consistently ask questions about processes and procedures that will help them steal from the company.
  • A seemingly harmless associate with no apparent agenda. Their behavior won’t be as easy to spot as the first two. Having audits and checks/balances in place will likely help you catch them.

How they do it

These are not always tell-tale signs of fraud, but those who commit internal fraud are likely to:

  • Always be willing to take on additional tasks that could lead to fraud and have nothing to do with their current duties.
  • Learn as much as they can about company systems to use in conducting fraud. Systems can include but aren’t limited to: accounting, accounts payable/receivable, payroll, bank account access. They will look for weaknesses in policies or procedures.
  • Earn management’s trust with regard to the most vulnerable parts of the company.

Once they gather the necessary information and gain the trust of the company leaders, they will begin their plan. This could be creating “ghost” associates in payroll or diverting funds to a new account for a fake vendor.  A click of the mouse and the associate can send e-mails on behalf of the company or executives  requesting wire or A.C.H. transfers from their bank account.  Sometimes it’s as simple as stealing money directly or even selling confidential company information on the internet.

Why they do it

The best example of why an associate will commit fraud is described by Dr. Donald Cressey as the Fraud Triangle Model, a tool for assessing the risk of fraud. Cressey was a criminologist who studied embezzlers.

Fraud Triangle

  • Pressure is often financial and usually stems from addiction, living beyond one’s means, major medical expenses or gambling losses.
  • Rationalization is the explanation why the theft is not really wrong. Some associates tell themselves that it’s a loan and will be repaid. Others feel they are not paid enough and deserve more.
  • Opportunity is the opinion that a fraud can be committed without being caught. The thief sees poor internal controls, poor supervision, poor “tone at the top” or a combination of these.

Some of the best ways to avoid internal fraud is to set up regular, thorough audits and reviews of processes in your company.  Make sure associates have an avenue to report instances of fraud, such as an anonymous hotline.  Establish the ethical tone at the top where executive management or business owners set the tone for ethical behavior within your organization as a top priority.


Dennis Knop is a vice president and external corporate fraud investigator of UMB Bank, n.a. He has worked for UMB for 20 years, and 14 years of that in fraud investigation. He has a Bachelor of Science in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Mr. Knop is a Certified Fraud Examiner and currently serves as the chairperson of the Midwest Financial Fraud Investigators Group in St. Louis, Mo.



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Don’t let your business be an easy target for fraud

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Fraud can come in many forms, from counterfeit checks to stolen credit cards and trusted employees to savvy hackers. For businesses, fraudulent activity is always bad news. According to the Association for Financial Professionals’ (AFP) 2015 survey, 62 percent of companies were targets of payments fraud in 2014 with financial losses that ranged anywhere from a relatively small amount to millions of dollars. The good news for businesses is that there are numerous measures out there that can help prevent and detect fraudulent activity. In addition, advanced technology is being developed and deployed now that will help companies better protect their operations and their bottom line.2015 AFP Payments Fraud and Control Survey

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The many forms of fraud

According to the AFP, the most common form of fraud businesses encounter is through checks, corporate credit/debit cards and wire transfers. Paper checks continue to be the payment type most vulnerable to fraudulent attacks and account for the largest dollar amount of financial loss, even though their use continues to decline. Credit and debit cards are the second most popular form of business fraud, although they experienced a decline in fraudulent activity, down from 43 percent in 2013 to 34 percent in 2014.  And lastly, wire fraud incidents almost doubled from 14 percent in 2013 to 27 percent last year.

The newest form of fraud is cyberfraud in which criminals create an email account for corporate executives or vendors and send emails with payment instructions to employees in the accounting department. Employees who are unaware of the fake or altered email account will follow the instructions and make payment.

Be prepared

While it may seem daunting, businesses can take steps to protect against fraudulent activity. Positive Pay is one example of how companies can get ahead of the game. Positive Pay is an automated fraud detection tool offered by most banks. Here is how it works: Companies cut checks every month and send the bank a list of all those checks, including check numbers, amounts and payees. As checks clear against the account, the bank makes sure the checks match up, eliminating any fraudulent or altered checks.

To protect against internal fraud, business owners should implement dual control and separation of duties. Understand who is in charge of what responsibilities on the financial side and make sure there are no gaps. Implement dual control over the businesses banking transactions, meaning the same person who is running payables should not be the same person who is reconciling accounts. Also, business owners should review financial statements on a weekly or monthly basis.

To mitigate compromise in these areas, businesses should review all areas of their operation and put the proper preventions in place to protect against fraud. For instance, businesses should ensure their employees have the proper education and training for fraud detection. They should install, maintain and update spam filters, anti-virus software and firewalls. Reducing check writing, outsourcing payroll and having dual controls are additional tips that can help prevent fraudulent activity.

New technology on the way
2015 Payments Fraud and Control Survey
In addition to being prepared, businesses will soon be able to rely on new technology to help protect against fraud. The latest and most anticipated technology is EMV (Europay, MasterCard and Visa) chip cards, which will have a major impact on lessening credit and debit card fraud. So much so that 92 percent of financial professionals believe EMV technology will be effective in reducing fraud at the point-of-sale.

Traditional magnetic stripe cards require a signature for security purposes, whereas the new chip cards will add an additional layer of sophisticated fraud protection through an embedded microchip that turns the cardholder’s information into a unique code that is difficult to duplicate or copy when used at a chip-enabled terminal.

Merchants and retailers are currently in the process of investing in new card reading technology that will accept EMV chip cards. If they do not update their technology, they could potentially be liable for fraudulent transactions and not the user or card issuer. Visa intends to institute a liability shift in the United States for domestic and cross-border counterfeit transactions effective Oct. 1, 2015. This shift will encourage Visa issuing banks to begin issuing EMV chip cards and merchants to begin deploying card swipe technology that can process the chip-on-chip transaction.

While new technology and preventative measures can help businesses protect against fraud, the truth is that it will always exist in one form or another. What businesses can do is educate their employees, make sure they are using the most up-to-date technology and work with their financial partners to ensure the best practices and protective measures are in place.

 

Source: 2015 Association for Financial Professionals (AFP) Payments Fraud and Control Survey

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Internal Fraud: How to protect your company

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You don’t want to believe it. But the numbers just aren’t adding up. You want to trust the people who work for you, but eventually you have to come to terms with the fact that someone in your company is stealing money. Not only does it hurt your business, but it’s often a heartbreaking realization for you as a manager or owner.

It’s not always easy to figure out who is the culprit, but there are steps you can take to detect and hopefully prevent fraud within your company.

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Dual control and separation of duties

Understand who is in charge of what financial responsibilities and make sure there are no gaps. Create a system of checks and balances so that the same person who is running payables (bills, invoices, expense reports) isn’t the same person who is reconciling the accounts (balancing the company checkbook, so to speak).

It’s also a good idea for business owners to review financial statements on a weekly or monthly basis.

Automated fraud detection

Consider implementing Positive Pay. This automated fraud detection tool is offered by most banks. It’s a relatively simple process. Your company issues checks every month and you send the bank a list of all those checks, including check numbers, amounts and payees. The bank makes sure the checks match up as each one clears. This eliminates any fraudulent or altered checks. Automated fraud detection is a great solution for companies as long as they already have dual controls in place.

Anonymous tip line

Businesses should also consider setting up an anonymous fraud tip line. Internal fraud is most often detected by a tip from another associate. As a business owner or manager, you can’t know everything that’s going on in your company. Giving your associates an anonymous way to notify you is a simple, effective way to detect internal fraud.

Other processes and procedures to consider:

  • Reputable third-party audits
  • Periodic reviews of policies, procedures and controls
  • Diversity of associates’ job functions, including rotation of job duties at times
  • Periodic spot checks of your account payables/receivables, payroll, etc.

Don’t think it will happen to you? Keep this in mind. 61 percent of financial professionals reported that their organization experienced attempted or actual payments fraud in 2012. And 26 percent of fraud is committed by an organization’s own associates (Source: Association for Financial Professionals). Even though you want to assume the best from your associates, you should have systems in place to ensure that you don’t become another internal fraud statistic.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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10 financial safety tips for vacation

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Most people think summer is the only time to take a vacation. But a lot of people take vacations in the fall and winter when flights and hotels are less expensive and tourist destinations aren’t as crowded.

A vacation is a great time for relaxation and spending time with family and friends. The last thing you want is to stress about fraud and have your vacation ruined because of a lost or stolen credit card. You can usually avoid this headache if you take a few extra steps when preparing for a trip or are more aware of your surroundings. Here are few tips to help prevent you from becoming a victim of fraud on vacation.

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  1. Protect cards as if they are cash. Do not leave them unattended anywhere, such as in a car, restaurant or even at the pool. If you are traveling, your cards should be with you at all times. Or you can put them in a secure location like a hotel safe.
  2. Never write down a personal identification number (PIN) – memorize it. Also, designate unique PINs for each card, and use random number, letter and symbol combinations when possible. Do not use easy to crack codes, such as a birth date, which could easily be found in your wallet.
  3. Don’t leave credit cards in your car’s glove compartment. An alarmingly high amount of all credit card thefts are from this area.
  4. Always check to make sure cards are returned when used at a store or restaurant. It’s easy to forget cards, especially when you’re on vacation. And it’s easy for servers or sales people to return the wrong card when they’re in a hurry.
  5. Don’t carelessly discard or leave documents that contain personal information in the open – including account numbers – such as car rental agreements or airline tickets.
  6. Do not give account numbers over the phone unless you have initiated the call. Most companies will only ask you to verify a portion of your personal information.
  7. Always take receipts and destroy any extra copies.
  8. If you travel overseas, let your card provider know about your plans to travel to a foreign country. There may be restrictions on using cards in some countries and a provider will be less likely to question the foreign transactions if prior notice is given.
  9. If you decide to shop online on vacation or need to update flight or hotel reservations online, be mindful of the websites you visit and what information you share. Always purchase from websites that start with https because this means it is a secure site. Also, be mindful when using public Wi-Fi networks. Internet connections that require a password are the safest. You don’t want that new eBook you ordered online costing you half your bank account.
  10. Most fraudulent use of cards takes place within a few days of their being lost or stolen. If your card is lost or stolen on vacation, immediately report it to the issuing bank or financial institution.

UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Internal fraud: Who they are and why they do it

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He looks like a typical associate. She could be a 20-something or a person in her fifties. He could be the person you eat lunch with every day. The truth is that you can’t pick out this person from the crowd. She is committing internal fraud in your company and doesn’t look any different from the rest of your co-workers. He makes sure he blends in.

So what should you look for if you suspect one of your associates is committing fraud?

Continue Reading

What to look for

  • A disgruntled associate who is vocal about their unhappiness with the company. They often use this as an excuse to commit fraud.
  • An overly enthusiastic associate who consistently ask questions about processes and procedures that will help them steal from the company.
  • A seemingly harmless associate with no apparent agenda. Their behavior won’t be as easy to spot as the first two. Having audits and checks/balances in place will likely help you catch them.

How they do it

These are not always tell-tale signs of fraud, but those who commit internal fraud are likely to:

  • Always be willing to take on additional tasks that could lead to fraud and have nothing to do with their current duties.
  • Learn as much as they can about company systems to use in conducting fraud. Systems can include but aren’t limited to: accounting, accounts payable/receivable, payroll, bank account access. They will look for weaknesses in policies or procedures.
  • Earn management’s trust with regard to the most vulnerable parts of the company.

Once they gather the necessary information and gain the trust of the company leaders, they will begin their plan. This could be creating “ghost” associates in payroll or diverting funds to a new account for a fake vendor. Sometimes it’s as simple as stealing money directly or even selling confidential company information on the internet.

Why they do it

The best example of why an associate will commit fraud is described by Dr. Donald Cressey as the Fraud Triangle Model, a tool for assessing the risk of fraud. Cressey was a criminologist who studied embezzlers.

Fraud Triangle

  • Pressure is often financial and usually stems from addiction, living beyond one’s means, major medical expenses, or gambling losses.
  • Rationalization is the explanation why the theft is not really wrong. Some associates tell themselves that it’s a loan and will be repaid. Others feel they are not paid enough and deserve more.
  • Opportunity is the opinion that a fraud can be committed without being caught. The thief sees poor internal controls, poor supervision, poor “tone at the top,” or a combination of these.

One of the best ways to avoid internal fraud is to set up regular, thorough audits and reviews of processes in your company. Stay tuned for an upcoming post that will go into more detail about how to catch internal fraud before it does serious damage to your business.


Dennis Knop is a vice president and external corporate fraud investigator of UMB Bank, n.a. He has worked for UMB for 20 years, and 14 years of that in fraud investigation. He has a Bachelor of Science in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Mr. Knop is a Certified Fraud Examiner and currently serves as the chairperson of the Midwest Financial Fraud Investigators Group in St. Louis, Mo.



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