Blog   Identity Theft

The Evil Airline Phishing Attack

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Imagine clicking on an attachment in an email confirmation for an online purchase or hotel reservation and being greeted by an urgent pop-up that reads, “A virus has been detected due to suspicious activity. Click here to run a diagnostic on your computer hard drive.” Seems like good advice, right? Before clicking OK, you might want to learn more about a new email phishing scam.

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Known as the evil airline phishing attack, this scam is a two-wave social engineering scam that attempts to take over your computer and steal sensitive personal information—or both— potentially leading to identity theft or damage to your computer. What makes this especially alarming is that recent research says this scam is successful about 90 percent of the time‡.

The scam targets individuals who frequently book travel or shop online and are familiar with receiving email confirmations on purchases or bookings. Like other phishing scams, cybercriminals research online and offline before sending these authentic looking emails. The subject line will look something like this:

When the victim receives the email, the two-wave phishing attack begins:

  • First wave: Opening the message signals to the cybercriminal that the email address is authentic and has been received by a real person.
  • Second wave: Inside the email is an authentic-looking attachment such as a .pdf or .docx file. This file is masquerading as a travel confirmation or purchase receipt with malware‡ embedded in it. If the attachment is opened, the malware springs into action impacting your data and computer.

The goal of these cybercriminals is to:

  • Trick you into clicking links and opening attachments which can secretly infect your computer or device
  • Access and steal your information (e.g. usernames, passwords, credit card numbers, etc.)
  • Make transactions, file fraudulent tax returns, use you or your children’s identity, share sensitive medical data with other hackers and a variety of other activities

How can you help protect yourself?

  • First defense: Desktops, laptops, tablets and even mobile devices are at risk of this attack. Install antivirus protection on your electronic devices (including tablets and mobile phones) and keep your hardware and software updated.
  • Second defense: Never click on links or attachments in emails you aren’t expecting. If something looks “phishy,” it probably is. If you have questions or concerns about any electronic communication, go to the company’s website to confirm details or contact them directly.
  • Final defense: Communicate with your coworkers, friends and family. One of the best ways to keep from falling victim is to ask questions, open dialogue and stay informed.

For more information to stay cyber aware, visit UMB’s Security and Privacy page.

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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7 Tips to Prevent Tax ID Fraud

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As the 2017 tax season gets underway, it’s a good idea to take extra precaution to prevent exposure to tax fraud. As we saw in 2016, criminals are using new and innovative methods to try to gain your trust or scare you into lowering your defenses and making a costly mistake. These tactics have continued‡ into 2017.

Tax identity fraud takes place when a criminal files a false tax return using a stolen Social Security number in order to fraudulently claim a refund. Identity thieves generally file false claims early in the year and victims are unaware until they file a return and learn one has already been filed in their name.

To help prevent tax ID fraud, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) ‡ and Internal Revenue Service (IRS) ‡ offer the following tips:

  • File early – File your tax return as soon as you have all of your documentation giving criminals less time to use your information to file a false return.
  • File on a protected Wi-Fi network – If you’re using an online service to file your return, be sure you’re connected to a password-protected personal network. Avoid using public networks like a Wi-Fi hotspot at a coffee shop.
  • Use a secure mailbox. If you’re filing by mail, mail your tax return at the post office or an official postal box instead of your mailbox at home. Some criminals look for completed tax return forms in home mailboxes during tax season.
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  • Find a tax preparer you trust. If you’re planning to hire someone to do your taxes‡, get recommendations and research a tax preparer thoroughly before handing over all of your financial information.
  • Shred what you don’t need. Once you’ve completed your tax return, shred the sensitive documents that you no longer need and safely file away the ones you do.
  • Beware of phishing scams by email, text or phone. Scammers may try to solicit sensitive information by impersonating the IRS‡. Know that the IRS will not contact you by email, text or social media. If the IRS needs information, they will contact you by mail first.
  • Keep an eye out for missing mail. Fraudsters look for W-2s, tax refunds or other mail containing your financial information. If you don’t receive your W-2s, and your employer indicates they’ve been mailed, or it looks like it has been previously opened upon delivery, contact the IRS immediately‡.

If you believe you’re a victim of tax identity theft or if the IRS denies your tax return because one has previously been filed under your name, you should:

  • Alert the IRS Identity Protection Specialized Unit at 1-800-908-4490
  • Respond immediately to any mailed IRS notice and complete IRS Form 14039‡, Identity Theft Affidavit
  • Contact your bank immediately, to determine if any accounts have been opened without your permission or if your current accounts have been tampered with
  • Contact the three major credit bureaus to place a fraud alert on your credit records:
  • Continue to pay your taxes and file your tax return, even if you must do so by paper

More information about tax identity theft is available from the FTC at ftc.gov/taxidtheft‡ and the IRS at irs.gov/identitytheft‡. To learn more ways to keep yourself protected online, visit UMB’s Security & Privacy page.

Content adapted from the American Bankers Association (ABA).

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Be safe, secure & informed

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Banking, socializing, shopping online and downloading apps make life more convenient and help us stay connected. But that convenience also gives cybercriminals more opportunity to take over our email and bank accounts, and infect our computers or steal our identities. Did you know consumers globally lost $158 billion to cybercrime in the past year? In the United States alone, the figure is nearly $30 billion. These cybercriminals are becoming savvier and sophisticated, making it even more important for you to know how to stay safe and secure online.

We want to do our part in helping you stay informed when it comes to online banking. That’s why we recently created our Security and Privacy Resource Center where you can go for tools and resources to help protect yourself online.

Go to the Security and Privacy Resource Center>>

UMB Security Resource Center

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You can use the Security News & Alerts section to help you stay up-to-date on the latest in cybersecurity and best practices. Here are even more resources and guidance on staying safe:

  • How UMB protects you: explains our strong commitment to your security and details of how we protect you when using our digital products.
  • How to protect yourself: provides you with best practices for mobile devices and other online activity.
  • Preventing identity theft: describes how identity theft occurs, steps to prevent identity theft and what to do if you become a victim of identity theft.
  • Privacy notice: provides you our most current detailed privacy notice.
  • Protect your business: provides our small business customers with 10 common security practices and resources for reducing security risk and the likelihood of fraud as well as information about popular fraud schemes such as the Business Email Compromise (BEC).
  • Report fraud: provides you a quick list of how to report fraud for:
  • ATM, debit card, or checking fraud for business or personal accounts
  • Credit card fraud
  • Identity theft
  • Suspicious phishing emails

We hope this provides you useful and meaningful information that you can use in our ever evolving digital world.  

Be sure to bookmark the Security and Privacy Resource Center so you can easily check back for updates to this new and expanded content.

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Tis’ the Season for Tax Fraud

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IRS tax refund scam tips

It’s tax time. As you prepare your taxes or eagerly await any refunds, it’s also time to be aware of tax scams. These scams include phishing emails, texts or phone calls that may warn of a delay with your return, promise a bigger refund or offer you a “helpful downloadable document.” These scams are designed to steal your refund, bank account information or identity by compelling you to provide your private information to the scammer.

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The IRS estimates that it paid $5.2 billion in fraudulent refunds as a result of identity theft last year. This year, in light of recent data breaches, individuals are urged to be especially careful. New scams offer credit monitoring services due to a breach or claim to be from popular tax software providers. The IRS has provided a list of The Dirty Dozen Tax Scams for 2015 to help keep us up to date on the latest scams.

In addition, be particularly aware of common tax season phishing emails like these:

  • You’re owed a refund and need to forward your bank account information for the refund deposit. The IRS does not initiate taxpayer communications through email or social media to request personal or financial information. If you receive an unsolicited email claiming to be from the IRS, send it to phishing@irs.gov.
  • Exciting offers or refunds for participating in an “IRS Survey.” This fake survey is actually used to acquire private and confidential information that is used to steal your identity.
  • Threats of fines or jail time for not making an immediate payment, or responding to the email. If you receive an intimidating email like this and even believe you might owe on taxes, contact your local IRS office and report the threatening email.
  • Documents or tools for tax preparation (e.g. “new changes in the tax law,” a tax calculator, etc.). Those “helpful” documents mentioned earlier may, in fact, be malicious files intended to infect your computer. Remember not all unsolicited email is legitimate. If you need current tax information, go to the IRS website or consult with a tax professional.

Scams don’t stop with phishing emails. Here are some helpful tips if you get calls or texts from someone pretending to be from the IRS:

  • If you know you owe taxes or think you might owe, call the IRS at 800-829-1040.
  • If you know you don’t owe taxes or have no reason to believe that you do, report the incident to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) at 1.800.366.4484 or at gov.
  • If phone scammers target you, also contact the Federal Trade Commission. Use their FTC Complaint Assistantto report the scam, and include “IRS Telephone Scam” to the comments of your complaint.

Remember, identity theft doesn’t stop at tax season so exercise your “spidey sense” with any email, unsolicited text or call asking for your personal information.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Learn how to prevent identity theft on Data Privacy Day

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Data Privacy Day

A whopping 9 out of 10 adults feel they have lost control over how personal information is collected and used by companies.* With tools at your fingertips allowing you to instantly share and receive online, your private information flows through the internet often without you giving it a second thought. Instead of sending you off with no electronics to rough it in the mountains just so you can protect your privacy, these stats should inspire you to expand your identity theft know-how and step up your privacy game.

I’d like to invite you to join UMB in participating in Data Privacy Day 2015.  Be one of the 6 in 10 Americans who are ready to do more to protect their personal information online.* Here are a few ways you can reduce your digital footprint, protect your privacy and prevent identity theft:

  • Think before you give out your Social Security number, first pet or mother’s maiden name. Does the business or website really need it? Could you use another piece of information?
  • Read the Privacy Policy. You may be surprised where your favorite online retailer or social media site shares your information. Here is UMB’s Privacy Statement.
  • Know how to update your privacy settings. Use these simple instructions on how to update privacy settings on Facebook, Pandora, email, internet browsers, mobile devices and more.
  • Review your bank and credit card statements regularly for unauthorized transactions. Use custom mobile banking alerts to monitor your accounts.
  • Check your credit reports. Every 12 months, you can get a free copy of your three reports at AnnualCreditReport.com.
  • Share with care. Consider the future and not just the moment with anything you post or share online. Once the information is in cyberspace it could be seen, stolen and used.

Celebrated on January 28, Data Privacy Day is an international effort centered on bringing attention to the importance of privacy, safeguarding data and enabling trust. Find out more about Data Privacy Day from the National Cyber Security Alliance.

 

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*Source: http://staysafeonline.org/stay-safe-online/resources/privacy-tips-for-2015-infographic

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Cyber security: 10 tips for protecting yourself online

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Did you know that one in eight Internet users (or 378 million adults) became victims of cybercrime last year according to a Norton Cybercrime Report? Instead of avoiding the Internet – a nearly impossible task – make an effort to smarten up your online habits with our new Online Security Resource Center coming in November and these 10 ways to keep you safe on the Internet:

protect yourself online

  1. Keep your computers and mobile devices updated – Having the latest security software, web browser and operating system are the best defenses against viruses, malware and other online threats. Turn on automatic updates so you receive the newest fixes as they become available.
  2. Set strong passwords with at least eight characters in length and a mix of upper and lowercase letters, numbers and special characters.
  3. Use different passwords for every account – It may be easier to remember one password, but if the password and email address you use for one account gets in the hands of the wrong person, they will start trying it on other sites and services.
  4. Think before you click – Be vigilant about the links you click in an email, especially when they come from companies. Don’t click on odd Facebook messages with links. If your friend is sending the email, make sure it sounds like the person you know; otherwise his or her account could have been compromised.
  5. Watch out for phishing scams that use fraudulent emails and websites to trick users into disclosing private account or login information. Do not click on links or open any attachments or pop-up screens from sources you are not familiar with. Report phishing emails to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).
  6. Keep personal information personal – Hackers can use social media profiles to figure out your passwords and answer those security questions in the password reset tools. Lock down your privacy settings and avoid posting things like birthdays, addresses, mother’s maiden name, etc. Be wary of requests to connect from people you do not know.
  7. Secure your Internet connection – Always protect your home wireless network with a password. When connecting to public Wi-Fi networks, be cautious about what information you are sending over it.
  8. Shop securely online – Avoid sending payment information or credit card numbers through email. Make sure all personal information transactions are done on a secure site. When shopping online, only use trusted, secure websites. And before providing any personal or financial information, make sure the address bar changes from an “http” to an “https” address and includes a yellow padlock logo to the right of the Web browser address bar. The “s” stands for “secure,” and if you double-click on the yellow padlock logo, you’ll see a digital certificate for the website. When shopping online, use credit cards, not debit cards. This will minimize the damage in the event of a compromised account.
  9. Read the site’s privacy policies – Though long and complex, privacy policies tell you how the site protects the personal information it collects. If you don’t see or understand a site’s privacy policy, consider doing business elsewhere.
  10. Pay attention – It might seem obvious, but remember to keep your eyes open any time you’re using an Internet service.

Be sure to read the rest of our advice on protecting your mobile device and the ways cyber criminals try to steal your information.

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Source: American Bankers Association

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Cyber security: 10 tips for protecting your mobile device

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Your mobile device provides convenient access to your email, bank and social media accounts. Unfortunately, it can potentially provide the same convenient access to criminals. As we continue National Cyber Security Awareness Month, remember to always follow these tips from the American Bankers Association in conjunction with the Stop.Think.Connect. campaign to keep your information – and your money – safe.

protect your mobile

  1. Use the passcode lock on your smartphone and other devices – This makes it more difficult for thieves to access your information if your device is lost or stolen.
  2. Protect your phone from viruses and malicious software just like you do for your computer by installing mobile security software.
  3. Use caution when downloading apps – Apps can contain malicious software, worms, and viruses. Beware of apps that ask for unnecessary “permissions.”
  4. Download the updates for your phone and mobile apps. These contain valuable security patches and fixes for vulnerabilities.
  5. Avoid storing sensitive information like passwords or a social security number on your mobile device.
  6. Be aware of shoulder surfers – The most basic form of information theft is observation. Be aware of your surroundings especially when you’re punching in sensitive information.
  7. Wipe your mobile device before you donate, sell or trade it using specialized software or using the manufacturer’s recommended technique. Some software allows you to wipe your device remotely if it is lost or stolen.
  8. Beware of mobile phishing – Avoid opening links and attachments in emails and texts, especially from senders you don’t know. Be wary of ads (not from your security provider) claiming that your device is infected.
  9. Watch out for public Wi-Fi – Public connections aren’t very secure, so don’t perform banking transactions on a public network. If you need to access your account, try disabling the Wi-Fi and switching to your mobile network.
  10. Report any suspected fraud to your bank immediately.

Next week we’ll share 10 tips to protect yourself online to wrap up National Cyber Security Awareness Month.

 

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Source: American Bankers Association

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Cyber security: 10 ways cyber criminals try to steal information

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Did you know that 378 million adults were victims of cyber crime* and more than 13 million consumers suffered from identity theft** in 2013? October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month, and just as in previous years, we’ve joined other organizations, including the Department of Homeland Security to support the Stop.Think.Connect. campaign to help the American public better understand cyber threats and ways to be more safe and secure online.

This month, we’ll be bringing you a series of tips to help you stay safe when banking online, starting with today’s:

Capture

  1. Phishing – Phishing is a form of social engineering that uses a sense of urgency, personalization (often gleaned from information found on social media) or masquerades as a legitimate business to convince victims to provide information like bank account numbers, online banking user IDs and passwords or credit card information.
  2. Malware – Malicious software has evolved into stealthy, complex arsenals that are widely used and easily accessible to experienced cyber criminals and novice identity thieves alike. Malware can attach to browsers, steal keystrokes to send back to the attacker or intercept security codes on mobile devices – all of which can be used to steal your information.
  3. Email hijacking – You’ve all seen this one, even if you didn’t have a name for it. Remember when you received odd emails from your friends (which you hopefully deleted), later to get a frantic message from them saying “I was hacked!” Cyber criminals are able to hijack email accounts by guessing passwords, using phishing techniques or installing malware on the victims’ computers. Once they have access to your email account, the cyber criminal may be able to gain access to online banking or social media accounts. They may even begin emailing your contacts requesting money or account information, making you an unwilling accomplice to cyber crime.
  4. Mobile devices – Did you know that your mobile device is no different than your desktop or laptop computer when it comes to malware? Your mobile device can be infected just as your desktop or laptop would. In addition, mobiles devices can be easily lost or stolen. Once a device is obtained, the content of your device, browsing history, account IDs and passwords, may be accessed by the thief. In some cases, malware can even be planted on the stolen device and returned to obtain additional data. We’ll be bringing you more tips specific to your phone later this month.
  5. Eavesdropping – “Sniffing” is a common word used for searching out potential eavesdropping victims. One of the easiest places to sniff is an open Wi-Fi (Wi-Fi networks that don’t require a password) such as hotels, coffee shops and sporting arenas. Once a target is identified, cyber criminals can easily intercept personal or financial information being transmitted over the open Wi-Fi network. Cyber criminals will also set up their own unsecured Wi-Fi connection to lure unsuspecting victims.
  6. Online gaming –Playing games online can often involve a social network and customizable content requiring downloads or computer updates. These can be used to phish for personal or financial information or infect systems with malware. In many cases, online gaming accounts are tied to payment information as well.
  7. Drive-by downloads – It’s easier than you realize to become infected by malware. A drive-by is malware that is automatically downloaded to your computer or device. These downloads occur without your knowledge and don’t require you to click a file, button or link to begin. These infections can be delivered simply by viewing a website, checking an email or clicking a pop-up window.
  8. Merchant breaches – As we’ve seen in the news lately, these breaches occur when a merchant’s security system is compromised. Capable hackers are able to crack the security of the merchant and access large volumes of card or account data. This information can then be sold to create new cards for fraudulent use or commit other financial crimes.
  9. Pretext Calls – One of the oldest tricks in the book is the telephone scam. These veteran social engineers call posing as computer technicians offering to help update your computer, remove a virus or sell you software. Once they’ve established a rapport with the victim, they can ask for credit card or bank account information or direct them to a website to download malware.
  10. Dumpster diving – Believe it or not, this is still a common method of identity theft that happens when thieves go through garbage in search of financial statements, receipts and letters with personal information. Surprisingly, some people still toss personal data in the trash can rather than using a shredder or shred bin.

Next week, we’ll bring you 10 tips for protecting your mobile device.

 

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Sources: Buzz Hilestad, Principal Consultant Partner, Secure Healthcare Solutions

*American Bankers Association
**Javelin Strategy

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Target Credit/Debit Card Security Breach

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You may have seen the recent news that Target experienced a breach in electronic security‡ with their customers’ debit and credit cards. While UMB has security protocols in place, we ask that you remain vigilant as well. You can use our online or mobile banking options to check balances and transaction history 24/7. If you see any suspicious activity on your account, please contact our customer service associates as soon as possible. That number is 800.821.5184.

Credit card

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Balancing Act: The changing landscape of commercial banking

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Technology has changed the way people do business. It’s also changed the way they do business banking. You can transfer money between two business accounts in minutes with online banking or complete and submit your entire expense report on the computer. Technology gives you the convenience of having greater control over your company’s finances. But that shouldn’t change the business partnership you have with your company’s bank.

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Like any relationship, creating and maintaining an effective partnership requires regular communication between you and your bank partner.  A strong relationship with your company’s financial institution not only enhances your customer experience, but also helps the bank balance quality service with a high level of information security.

Customer Experience

Your banker should know your company beyond what can be learned from a monthly commercial credit card statement. Your bank should act as an extension of your business and not just a place for you to keep your corporate accounts. Understanding the business cycles and unique financial needs of your engineering firm or your agriculture business gives your bank the insight to be a partner working with you on developing ideas to help your business succeed. This experience begins with a simple but powerful idea: know your customer.

For example, a bank that uses “know your customer” requirements for you to access your account can take this information and use it as a chance to get to know you and your employees better. At UMB, we require you to provide information that will uniquely identify you as the customer you say you are when you call us. These precautions are also good security measures to reduce potential fraud on your accounts.

Information Security

Having a strong relationship with your bank is important to your information security. Most banks will monitor spending habits to check for fraudulent activity on your commercial cards. For example, if a commercial card for a construction company starts posting a series of expensive charges at a department store within several hours, UMB might flag that account for suspicious activity or even put a hold on the card to stop any further transactions. Some might see this as too constrictive and even intrusive, but if you have a good working relationship with your financial institution you’re more likely to view this type of monitoring as a partner looking out for your company’s financial well-being.

So what can you do as a customer to keep the two-way communication open? Keeping your profile with your bank up-to-date makes it easier to verify who you are when you need to contact them. This also helps your bank ensure an accurate and safe customer experience.

Balancing self-service, customer service and information security is a challenge. A good bank should maintain the fine line between giving you the freedom to run your business and manage your finances, while remaining a loyal business partner who will always looks out for your best interests and the financial safety of your company.


Mr. Wegner is vice president and commercial card product manager at UMB. In this role, he is responsible for product development and program design for new and existing programs. He joined UMB in 2011. He earned an MBA in Management from Rockhurst University in Kansas City MO. He is a member of the NAPCP Public Sector Advisory Board.



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