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Individual retirement trust: a new way to save for retirement

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An individual retirement trust allows you to maintain the tax advantages that come with saving and investing in an individual retirement account (IRA), while providing you with the long-term control of a trust. You may be familiar with the uses and benefits of an IRA, and you may have a good understanding of trusts, but this unique solution can be the best of both worlds.

Individual retirement trust: a new way to save for retirement

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The basics

An IRA, whether Roth or traditional, is a savings mechanism that allows you to invest funds for your future retirement. The sooner you begin putting money into an IRA, the more time your money has to grow before you reach 70½, the age at which you are required to begin taking distributions from the account. IRAs prepare you for retirement and provide tax advantages, allowing you to choose whether to make contributions tax-free (traditional) or receive your distributions tax-free (Roth).

A trust is an estate planning tool that allows you to set aside funds for specific beneficiaries to receive when you pass away. Trusts can be managed by a third party called a trustee. The trustee handles management of the trust, including things like managing trust investments, making distributions to beneficiaries and taking care of trust assets, both during your lifetime and after your death.

An individual retirement trust combines the tax advantages of an IRA with the long-term control of a trust. This type of account allows you to save for retirement while maximizing tax advantages and ensures your IRA funds are distributed according to your wishes. Simply select your beneficiaries—whether people, organizations or charities—and the percentage of funds each beneficiary should receive, plus any conditions you have in mind. Once you have selected beneficiaries and determined percentages of distribution, the trustee oversees all of the distributions, including adjustments you may direct over time.

Using an individual retirement trust allows you to bypass the complicated IRS requirements involved in naming a trust as an IRA beneficiary, which is an alternative option. The trust portion of the account also helps protect your legacy from asset seizure by the potential creditors of your beneficiaries. If your heirs inherit your IRA assets without the protection of a trust, funds can be taken by a beneficiary’s creditors in the event of a beneficiary’s bankruptcy.

Also, individual retirement trusts can be set up with disability provisions that ensure your accounts are maintained in the event of your illness or long-term incapacitation. In this case, the trustee will take over the management of your retirement fund investments, coordinate bill pay and administer distributions as set forth in the document—all without the need for a separate guardian or conservator.

Who can benefit from an individual retirement trust?

Individual retirement trusts offer a unique structure that may not work for everyone. Most importantly, this structure is best for those who already have significant retirement assets and are concerned about the future management of those assets.

If you are particularly tax-sensitive, you may benefit from an individual retirement trust because it allows you to maximize the tax deferment available through the stretch payout option, whether the IRA is a traditional or Roth account.

If you have divorced and remarried, this solution can help you streamline the inheritance process by allowing you to select a variety of beneficiaries with varying inheritance percentages. Step-children can be included, as can organizations of your choice. For blended families, individual retirement trusts are beneficial in that they provide extensive control over the distribution of assets. Specifically, beneficiary designations will not be changeable, even after your passing, which ensures the heirs you have chosen are provided with exactly what you have determined for them regardless of later marriages or life changes.

Individual retirement trusts are also good vehicles for those concerned with the use of the funds by heirs and seek to include limitations. Any amount set aside for a beneficiary that is more than the required minimum distribution (RMD) can be subject to the trustee’s discretion.

Bottom line:

An individual retirement trust can help you achieve the tax advantages of an individual retirement account paired with a comprehensive asset management plan for your heirs–now and in the future. You will be able to build and customize your legacy with multiple beneficiaries, long-term control and detailed asset distribution options. Combining an IRA with a trust can streamline your legacy administration and simplify the process in one efficient document.
 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Conley is a vice president and legal counsel for UMB Private Wealth Management. He is responsible for reviewing estate planning documents and working with attorneys, clients, trust and bank associates regarding various legal issues that arise in the creation of trusts and estates. He joined UMB Private Wealth Management in 2000. Mr. Conley is an attorney and Certified Public Accountant. He is licensed to practice law in Kansas and Iowa.



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Financial Word of the Week: Mutual Fund

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Financial Word of the Week - mutual funds

A mutual fund is an easy way to invest your money and receive the benefits of a diversified investment portfolio. The fund is usually made up of multiple types of investments like stocks or bonds. The fund’s portfolio manager handles your money invested in the fund.

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Just like with any investment tool, there are advantages and disadvantages to consider.  Here’s a short list:

Advantages:

  • Investors with smaller amounts can get into the game. Your investment is affected by ups and downs of the market and may generate additional taxable income.  Remember, you are pooling your investment with a group of people who are all hoping to make a profit.
  • You are working with professionals who have your best interest in mind. Mutual funds bring diversification, meaning you can spread your money out into multiple investment strategies. The funds are usually very liquid as well, meaning you can access your money in a short period of time..

Disadvantages:

  • You don’t have control over the fund – the portfolio manager and the market do. It will be important to trust your portfolio managers in the decisions they will make for you and to carefully select funds based on your risk tolerance and investment time frame.
  • Management fees are most likely associated with the fund, so it is important to understand the fee structure. Another thing to consider is that you will not know the exact price of your fund before you invest or redeem. The price of most funds is determined once every business day after the market is closed and your trade is valued at that price.

If you want more information about mutual funds, we recommend doing some research through the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commissionor the Investment Company Institute.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.

 


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Financial Word of the Week: Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs)

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Financial Word of the Week

So far this month, we talked about a few savings account options, including HSAs, FSAs and 401(k) plans.  Two other common retirement savings account options are traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs.

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Traditional IRAs

A traditional IRA (Individual Retirement Account) is a savings account for retirement that gives you tax advantages. The contributions you make to your traditional IRA might be deductible from your taxes depending on a few circumstances.

The IRS sets the limit on how much you can contribute. This year the maximum amount is $5,500 or $6,500 if you are 50 or older. Even if you contribute less than this amount, your contribution is still eligible for tax deductions.

Generally, if you are contributing to a traditional IRA, you cannot access the money without a tax penalty until you are 65, have participated in the plan for at least 10 years or terminate service with your employer. You can learn more on the IRS website.

Roth IRAs

A Roth IRA is a savings account for retirement where the contributions are not tax-deductible. Roth IRAs are very flexible. You can withdraw your regular contributions without a tax penalty or fee; however, you generally cannot withdraw your earnings on the contributions without penalty until you are 59.5 or have held the account for five years.

In order to be eligible to contribute a Roth IRA, your modified adjusted gross income must be less limits established by the IRS. There are also contribution limits. It may seem like a no-brainer, but you cannot contribute more than you make in a year if your earned income is less than your contribution limit. So if you make $4,000 a year at a part-time job, you wouldn’t be allowed to contribute $5,000 to your Roth IRA using other funds like interest from another savings account.

Another advantage is if you decide to work during retirement, you can continue to contribute to the account. You can also leave money in your Roth IRA for as long as you live. Learn more on the IRS website.

While there are many savings options available, always do your research first and talk to a trusted financial advisor to ensure you are using the best account for your unique retirement goals.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.

 


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Financial Word of the Week: 401(k) Plan

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Financial Word of the Week

A 401(k) plan is a retirement savings account usually offered through your employer. Some employers will offer a match or non-elective contribution to your retirement account, which is a smart way to help you reach your retirement goals faster.

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It’s important to understand the plan your company offers to ensure you are getting the full employer match by contributing as much as you need to be. Remember, your employer’s contribution match is free money!

The contribution you elect to make is taken out of your salary before taxes. The IRS regulates how much you can contribute each year. For 2015, the limit is $18,000. If you are 50 or older (and therefore closer to retiring), you can contribute an additional $6,000 as a catch-up contribution. 401(k) contributions are usually invested in mutual funds, which will be covered later in our series. Generally, a 401(k) account cannot be accessed until you are 65 without early withdrawal tax penalties.

Use our calculator to obtain an estimate of where you stand with your retirement savings.

If your employer doesn’t offer a 401(k) plan, stay tuned for next week’s post when we explore other retirement savings account options.

 


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Tips for rolling over your retirement plan

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Changing careers? Retiring? Besides experience, one of the most important things you may take with you is your previous employer’s retirement plan assets. Before you make that decision, there are a few options to consider:

  • Keeping some or all of your assets in your former employer’s plan, if permitted;
  • Rolling over the assets to your new employer’s plan, if one is available and rollovers are permitted;
  • Rolling over your plan assets to an IRA; or
  • Cashing out the account value.

There are pros and cons to each of those choices, depending on your unique financial needs and retirement plans. Be sure to consult with your previous plan administrator, your new employer’s plan administrator (if applicable) and tax or legal professionals to address your questions about the asset transfer options and the tax consequences of each choice.

So what are the differences between employer plan(s) and rollover IRAs for you to take into consideration? Here are some of the factors that may be relevant to your specific needs:

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Investment Options:

  • Rollover IRA — often enables an investor to select from a broader range of investment options
  • Employer-sponsored retirement plan – smaller range of investment options, but more options in other areas

You’ll need to ask how satisfied you are with the options available under your current or prospective plan in comparison with an IRA’s array of investments. Evaluate and compare investment options for each of the following:

  • Your previous employer-sponsored plan
  • Your new or current employer-sponsored plan, if applicable
  • Rollover IRA

Fees and Expenses:

Both employer-sponsored retirement plans and rollover IRAs typically involve:

  • investment-related expenses, including:
    • Sales loads, commissions, 12b-1 fees, investment advisory fees and other expenses of any mutual funds in which assets are invested
    • Commissions and some of these fees may be paid to the broker-dealer or advisor (such as UMB Financial Services, Inc.) who helps open and service the rollover IRA.
  • plan or account fees, including:
    • Plan administrative fees (e.g., record keeping, compliance, trustee fees) and fees for services such as access to a customer service representative. In some cases, employers pay for some or all of the plan’s administrative expenses. Evaluate and compare each of the following:
        • Investment-related expenses and plan fees at your previous employer-sponsored plan
        • Investment-related expenses and plan fees at your new or current employer-sponsored plan, if applicable
        • Investment-related expenses and account fees associated with a rollover IRA

Services:

Different levels of service may be available under each transfer option. Some employer-sponsored plans, for example, provide access to investment advice, planning tools, telephone help lines, educational materials and workshops. Similarly, IRA providers offer different levels of service, which may include online, discount or full brokerage services, investment advice and retirement and distribution planning. It is important to evaluate and compare the services available through each of the following retirement vehicles:

  • Your previous employer-sponsored plan
  • Your new or current employer-sponsored plan, if applicable
    • A  rollover IRA

Penalty-Free Withdrawals:

Penalty-free withdrawals may be available if you’re between 55 and 59½ when you leave an employer-sponsored plan. However, penalty-free withdrawals usually cannot be made from a rollover IRA until age 59½. It also may be possible to borrow from an employer-sponsored plan. Generally, borrowing from your rollover IRA is considered a prohibited transaction, which would subject you to penalties and even potential disqualification of the IRA.

Protection from Creditors and Legal Judgments:

Under federal law, you usually have unlimited protection from bankruptcy and creditors with the funds you have in employer-sponsored plans. With IRA assets, however, state laws vary in their protection from the claims of creditors. Protecting retirement assets from claims of creditors can be very complicated, so you should discuss any questions relating to your personal situation with competent legal counsel.

Required Minimum Distributions:

Once an individual reaches age 70½, the rules for plans and traditional IRAs require the periodic withdrawal of certain minimum amounts, known as the required minimum distribution. If a person is still working at age 70½, however, required minimum distributions generally are not mandatory in an employer plan. This may be advantageous if you plan to work into your 70s.

Employer Stock:

If you have any employer stock in your retirement plan, we highly recommend seeking advice on how to handle that stock. Here’s why: Your employer stock distributions are taxed differently. When employer stock is distributed in a lump sum, in-kind, from an employer-sponsored retirement plan, the employee is taxed only upon the stock’s cost basis at the time of distribution. Later, when the stock is sold after the distribution from a qualified plan, the proceeds are treated as long-term capital gain to the extent attributable to net unrealized appreciation.

An investor who holds significantly appreciated employer stock in an employer-sponsored retirement plan should carefully consider the tax consequences of rolling the stock to an IRA vs. taking a lump sum, in-kind distribution of the stock from the plan or leaving the stock in the plan. This is a very complicated issue which is why it should be discussed with your tax advisor.

 

If you ultimately decide to roll over your employer plan assets, it is important to read the IRA rollover plan information and all applicable investment literature and prospectuses carefully before deciding to invest in an IRA rollover. Past investment performance does not guarantee future results, and the value of your investment will fluctuate and may be more or less than the original investment.

 

The foregoing discussion is provided for informational purposes only and should not be considered as tax or legal advice. You should consult with your own legal and/or tax advisors for advice about your personal situation.

Not FDIC Insured   ●   May Lose Value   ●   No Bank Guarantee

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.




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Don’t let tax credits fall through the cracks

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How can you get a bigger refund when filing your taxes? These tips can help:
tax credit tips
Even if you’re dreading the process of filing your taxes this year, taking the time to know what you’re doing can equal a bigger refund check. Everything from plugging in your electric car to adopting a child can be considered for deductions, so don’t miss out on refunds this year.

The IRS offers several federal tax credit options designed to lessen the burden of taxpayers. This is especially true for low- and middle-income households, which often retain a higher percentage of their annual salaries for basic living expenses than high-income households.

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Earn tax deductions with a retirement plan
Some of the best tax deductions tend to be linked to retirement plans. With these deductions, you save money on annual taxes and invest in your future.

The Saver’s Tax Credit (previously known as the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit) is for those making eligible contributions to a 401(k), IRA, or other workplace retirement plans such as a 403(b), 457, or Thrift Savings Plan. If you’re contributing and are in a lower-income bracket, you can receive a tax credit up to $1,000 when filing alone and up to $2,000 if filing jointly.  This credit is on top of the tax advantages already associated with retirement plans, which might include pre-tax contributions, tax-deferred growth, or tax-free withdrawals in retirement.

Tax credits for small business owners
The IRS also offers potential tax credits for small business owners. One of the biggest deductions is through a home office credit.

More than 50 percent of U.S. small businesses operate at an owner’s home, according to the Small Business Administration(SBA). Unfortunately, many fear taking advantage of this tax credit will red flag an audit from the IRS. The good news is, that fear is usually unfounded.

To be eligible for a home office tax deduction, the IRS requires a portion of a residential property to be considered a legitimate home office. The home must be a primary workplace. If there is an additional office used, you cannot file a home office deduction. An exception can sometimes be made for those who work all day at an office part of the week and all day at home the rest of the week.

To figure out a home office credit, the SBA recommends calculating deductions by comparing the size of the home office versus the rest of the home. However, a business owner can also deduct expenses for a separate freestanding structure, which means a business owner can use a studio to conduct work, or a garage or barn for storage. But those freestanding structures should be exclusively for business.

Tax refunds as a way to save
Remember that getting a large refund may not always be in your best interest. It could be a sign that you’re having too much money withheld from your wages. If you have trouble saving on a regular basis, however, forced savings through tax withholdings is better than not saving at all. Just try to set aside all or a portion of your refund for the future. Some great ways to use your refund include paying down high-interest debt, building an emergency fund and investing for retirement.

 

Take a look at the IRS website for a comprehensive list of deductions, and ask a trusted tax accountant for advice on which ones apply to your situation so you can take full advantage of your options.

 

*This post is not meant to replace the advice of a tax professional.

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Chen is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager for UMB Private Wealth Management. He is responsible for all aspects of portfolio construction, including asset allocation, security selection and mutual fund analysis for high-net-worth clients. He joined UMB in 2013 and has 10 years of experience in the financial services industry. Mr. Chen earned a Bachelor of Science in Business with an emphasis in Financial Management from Kansas State University and Master of Science in Business with a Finance Concentration from the University of Kansas. He serves on the board of directors for the Financial Planning Association of Greater Kansas City and the Kansas City CFA Society. He is a Certified Financial Planner® and is a CFA charterholder.



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How saving money differs in your 40s, 50s and 60s

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We already told you how your financial goals and habits vary from decade to decade in your 20s and 30s. The same is true as you move into your 40s and up until retirement. Here are some pro tips on how to take full advantage of each unique decade.

generations

Things to DO in your 40s

Do meet with a financial planner to make sure you’re on the right track to retire when you want and with the right amount to continue living the lifestyle you want. Retirement may seem very far away, but you don’t want to let yourself be caught in your early 60s playing catch-up on your 401(k).

Do decide how saving for major purchases balances with your retirement saving. If you have children, are you going to pay for all or some of their college tuition? What about your children’s weddings? These are examples of things that can cause parents to be caught off guard and can put a pause on your important retirement saving. For more information on these decisions, take a look at our recent post on Kids’ college vs. retirement: where to save?

And one thing to AVOID in your 40s

Don’t miss out on the maximum match from your employer on your retirement plan. As we’ve recommended from your first job in your 20s, be sure to take full advantage of the match from your employer. Of course, going above that amount is also a great idea; just be sure you’re reaching that minimum amount to get your full match.

 

Things to DO in your 50s 

Do think of this decade as your time to save the most (less expenses with children out of the home and typically higher income than you earned earlier in your career). Consider paying off high-cost debt, such as your mortgage, if you haven’t already and then save aggressively.

Do add catch-up contributions to your retirement savings. Even if you’re tracking well toward your retirement goals, you’re allowed to save more now, so do it!

And one thing to AVOID in your 50s

Don’t wait until your 60s to purchase long-term care insurance. The average age to buy this type of insurance is 57. If you wait until a few years later, it will be much more expensive.


Things to DO in your 60s
 

Do prepare aggressively for retirement…even before your planned last day of work. It’s difficult to predict when health, layoffs or extra time needed to care for your aging parents will cause you to retire earlier. This is the case with more than 40 percent of workers.

Do think about downsizing. This isn’t something that needs to wait until you’re already retired. If you’re single or if it’s just you and your spouse in your home, consider where you want to live for the next few decades and if moving makes sense.

And one thing to AVOID in your 60s

Don’t keep the same insurance policies you had in your 30s. You might not need life insurance anymore. Check your long-term care insurance policy to see what benefits it includes.

Remember, whether you’re 21 or 68, it’s never too late to improve your financial plan.

 

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References: *2012 National Association of REALTORS® Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers

Inspired by a Daily Finance article

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Ponce is a Financial Center Manager for UMB Bank. She is responsible for managing the Collinsville micro-market. She joined UMB in 1991 and has 23 years of experience in the financial services industry.



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Navigating through the “sandwich years” (Hometown Perspective: Warsaw, Mo.)

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My husband and I are very proud of our three children who are currently in various stages of college. We’re also blessed to have some of our parents still with us. We’re in the midst of the “sandwich years.” Our children are transitioning into adulthood and our parents are dealing with the prospect of additional – and often much higher – health care costs.

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The situation certainly isn’t new, but the financial challenges of this particular age group have recently changed. In addition to your retirement fund(s) likely taking significant losses during the financial crisis, those of us currently in the sandwich years also face the financial challenges of our children and parents. Our kids are graduating into an extremely difficult job market, while our parents are dealing with the rising costs of health care on a fixed income. With these challenges, sometimes our parents and kids may need our help financially.

Don’t wait until you and your family are faced with these issues to begin dealing with them. Usually if a financial emergency occurs, you won’t have much time before you have to act. In my thirty plus years at UMB, I have seen customers in the middle of these transition years who haven’t had important discussions with their kids or their parents soon enough. Living in an area with a high concentration of retirees, I’ve seen countless children of senior parents who have waited too long to talk to them about their financial plans.

So what can you do to plan for the sandwich years?

Prepare your children for financial independence by:

  • Opening a college fund as soon as possible (your kids don’t have to be burdened with student loan repayments while they work to become financially stable).
  • Teaching them the foundation of financial responsibility at an early age.
  • Encouraging them to hold part-time jobs as teenagers to develop a strong work ethic early on, and learn the benefit of saving and budgeting.

Prepare your parents for the issues they will face by:

  • Having an open dialogue about their overall financial situation, while being respectful of their privacy and wishes.
  • Approaching the sensitive subjects of having a will, power of attorney and health care directive. They are difficult conversations, but it’s better to have them early. It is much harder to discuss finances when failing health and/or mental incapacity have occurred.

Prepare yourself for the sandwich years by:

  • Talking regularly with your financial advisor about what you need to do to prepare for your own retirement.
  • Creating an emergency fund. You don’t want to dip into your retirement fund if something should happen and your kids or parents need financial help.

The sandwich years can be very stressful but that stress can be greatly reduced if you plan ahead. Prepare your children to become financially independent young adults and ensure your parents have a financial plan for their senior years. And don’t forget to make your own financial preparations. Your children will thank you for it when they reach their sandwich years.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Porter is senior vice president and financial center manager for the Eastgate location in Warsaw, Mo. She joined UMB in 1981. Ms. Porter is responsible for managing the consumer sales and functions of that location and has been involved in many other areas of the bank in her thirty-two years with UMB. Actively involved in the community, she has worked closely with the Warsaw High School vocal and instrumental departments for many years. She is a trustee of the Mary Lay Scholarship Fund, currently serves on the Harbor Village Fund fundraising committee and is a board member of the Warsaw Area Chamber of Commerce.



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A smooth road to retirement

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Are you ready to begin the next stage of your life? Retirement is still an option despite the current slow-growth economy. If you’re considering or approaching retirement, there are several items to keep in mind when nearing this important milestone. If you are planning to leave the working world in the next 18 to 24 months, here are a few considerations in the current economy:

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  • Understand your actual timeline.

    Your “time horizon” may be longer than you realize. Life expectancy is also a big factor. A retirement date is an initial benchmark, but you need to keep in mind that your money can still “work for you” while you are enjoying your newly discovered free time.

  • Make sure to have a cash reserve.

    You should build up a reserve large enough to carry you through six to 12 months of retirement expenses. This can provide a cushion in case of an unexpected downturn or a major unplanned expense.

As markets can vary year to year, those with more than two years until retirement can plan for either situation in the following ways:

  • Increase contributions.

    Invest extra cash. Consistent dollar-cost averaging can help reduce the worry of when and how much to invest. You may also want to direct some of those extra contributions into a cash reserve, just in case of unexpected declines.

  • Diversify, diversify, diversify.

    Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Throughout market cycles, different classes, styles and assets with diverse market capitalizations perform differently. Actively managing your portfolio diversification can have a greater impact on performance than individual investments.

Most of all, flexibility and patience are virtues in the world of portfolio management.  Don’t fall in love with a retirement date, and don’t be frustrated with market activity. If you have questions or concerns, it may be advantageous to seek the advice of an experienced professional.

Professional advisors can offer objective, educated and customized guidance. They are also an objective and knowledgeable resource that can provide a valuable perspective. While an advisor may not be able to provide every person with the news they want to hear, a good financial advisor can help maximize and leverage the assets individuals have against their personal timelines, risk tolerance and goals.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Diederich serves as managing director of portfolio management. He is responsible for managing the portfolios of high net worth clients and select institutional relationships. He joined UMB in 2003. Mr. Diederich earned a Bachelor of Science in Finance from Missouri State University in Springfield, Mo., and a Master of Business Administration from the University of Missouri – Kansas City. He is a Certified Financial Planner®, a member of the Financial Planning Association and has more than 15 years of experience in the financial services industry.



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