Blog   UMB: Insights

Manufacturing and Technology: A New Workforce Dynamic

  |  Posted by

IndustryInsights_blog_555x19
How do you find the right employees for your organization? A panelist of leaders in the manufacturing industry shared their struggles and successes with the ever-changing workforce.

Panelists:

Jon Kinning, COO, RK Mechanical, Inc.
Kim Madigan, CEO, AdamWorks
Bill Newland, CEO, Hercules Industries
Kevin Fink, CEO, Ice-O-Matic

Moderator:

Bart Taylor, Founder/Publisher, Company Week

Next month, we’ll bring you these panelists’ insights on education and technology advancements.

 

Continue Reading

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



Leave a Comment

Tagged: , , , , ,

Export-Import Bank charter: what you need to know

  |  Posted by

What is the Export-Import Bank?

The Export-Import Bank of the United States (Ex-Im) is the official export credit agency of the United States. ExIm fills gaps in the trade finance market by working with lenders and brokers to ensure that U.S. businesses get what they need to sell abroad and be competitive in international markets.*

Here’s an example of a business that would use Ex-Im: ABC Company realized to grow their international sales, they needed protection against foreign buyers who might fail to pay them, or non-payment risk protection. Ex-Im approves a small business export credit insurance policy. A few months later, ABC Company sold $500,000 of products to China. Ex-Im had mitigated ABC’s fear of non-payment since the policy covered 95 percent of the commercial and political risks.

Both Democrats and Republicans are working to present a bill to renew the charter while other lawmakers would rather let the charter expire. Those against renewing the charter argue that the bank is a form of “corporate welfare.” Lawmakers who encourage renewal assert that Ex-Im helps U.S. exporters compete against foreign companies, which are backed by their government sponsored Economic Consulting Associations. This results in the generation of 2 billion government-funded dollars for U.S. taxpayers, but with zero cost to the U.S. taxpayer.

Who is affected?

Supporters of the bank charter include large companies such as Boeing, General Electric and Caterpillar.

However, the smaller businesses who use the ExIm services could also be impacted, possibly even more than the larger ones. Take a look at the below chart and facts showing a snapshot of ExIm Bank throughout the last five years.

chart

Source: Ex-Im website

Current Status

The Ex-Im Bank Charter was set to expire on September 30, however the House and Senate passed a continuing resolution which will extend it through June 30, 2015. During the next nine months, supporters and detractors will lobby for merits of Ex-Im and potential reforms. UMB will continue to monitor the progress and update you on what you need to know.

Continue Reading

*source: ExIm.gov

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Jarrett is the senior vice president, director of international services and sales for UMB. He is responsible for the overall leadership and product strategy for foreign exchange, trade finance and Canadian cash management. He joined UMB in 2013 and has 15 years of experience in the financial services industry. A native of Quito, Ecuador, Paul earned a Bachelor of Science – Accounting degree, from Palm Beach Atlantic University in Palm Beach, Florida.



Leave a Comment

Tagged: , , ,

Business Banking for Dentists

  |  Posted by

IndustryInsights_blog_555x19
Should new dentists purchase their first home or buy their practice? Watch to find out our recommendation and some pitfalls to avoid when financing a dental practice.

Continue Reading

Dave Bauer is a Vice President / Region Manager for UMB Business Banking. He is responsible for leading the Business Banking teams in the St. Louis and Oklahoma City regions. He joined UMB in 2011 and has eight years of experience in the financial services industry.



Leave a Comment

UMB Insights: Commercial Lending in St. Louis

  |  Posted by

The current lending environment in St. Louis is cautiously optimistic. Find out more about what industries are seeing the most growth this year.

Continue Reading

Mr. Peter Blumeyer is President of the St. Louis marketplace for UMB. He is responsible for overall commercial growth in the St. Louis metropolitan area and works closely with other lines of business leaders to drive overall growth in the region. He joined UMB in 2006 and has 10 plus years experience in the financial services industry. He currently resides in Glendale, MO with his wife and two small children.



Leave a Comment

Tagged: , ,

UMB Insights: Funding a Trust

  |  Posted by

We’ve already walked you through the process of estate planning. Today, we’ll explain how to fund that trust and give you an important reminder to update it as your life changes.

Continue Reading

Ms. Gattis joined UMB in 2009. As a Senior Financial Planner, she is responsible for working with clients to insure that they are finding a solution to reaching their unique financial goals. Ms. Gattis has 20 years of experience in the financial industry. Prior to joining UMB, she served as a Private Client Manager for US Trust. Ms. Gattis earned Bachelors in Human Resource Management and Masters in Business Administration degrees from Wichita State University.



Leave a Comment

Tagged: , , , ,

UMB Insights: Commercial Lending

  |  Posted by

Own a business? Earlier, we gave you an inside scoop from a lender’s perspective. Whether you’re just starting a company or renewing a long-time loan, here are a few more tips on what lenders need from you. We’ll also give you a look inside the industry and what types of loans we’re seeing this year.

Continue Reading

Tagged: , , ,

Industry Insights: Manufacturing…3 ways to become more efficient

  |  Posted by

IndustryInsights_blog_555x19
For manufacturers, finding more ways to increase cost-savings continues to be a top priority. Looking at the rise in lean standards shows this trend. And while many are making great strides in maximizing their physical operations, administrative areas should be considered as well. Specifically, consider these time and money savers in your company’s financial processes:

shutterstock_178938605

1) Plan for large investments – Evaluate and properly plan for equipment guidance line needs. As technology continues to evolve, many manufacturers are purchasing more equipment to support their operations. As businesses expand their work, make repairs or replace units, they may find themselves making multiple purchases throughout the year. Rather than go through the process of taking out a separate loan for each investment, manufacturers should map out their anticipated needs for the year and take out a line that will cover all potential investments. Not only will this save time, but it also provides flexibility for manufacturers to buy new or used equipment and to proactively plan for capital expenditures they may want to make during the year.

2) Streamline purchasing processesPurchasing cards are another item to consider from a processing standpoint. Not only does the right program provide valuable rewards, but it also cuts down on check writing, and provides increased flexibility in cash flow. Additionally, it creates a more streamlined tracking system for accounting departments. By allowing job numbers to be attached to specific expenses, companies can easily allocate costs to the appropriate projects, which results in more effective planning and budgeting.

3) Use payment technology – Remote deposit is a great service to incorporate into business operations as well. For manufacturers that have not yet made the jump, this is an easy, and extremely valuable, component to incorporate into the payments process. In addition to being very easy to use, it provides a safe and secure way to process incoming funds and also saves valuable time by eliminating the need for deposit trips to the bank.

As the saying goes, time is money, so implementing ways to become more efficient is a great way to positively affect the bottom line.

Continue Reading

Mr. Nohavec is a SVP/Business Development Officer for UMB Bank Colorado. He is responsible for Colorado. He joined UMB in 2005 and has 20 years of experience in the financial services industry.



Leave a Comment

What does the new Farm Bill mean for you?

  |  Posted by

IndustryInsights_blog_555x19
Bill Watson, president of UMB Agribusiness, breaks down what you need to know about the newly-passed Farm Bill in this video.

For more information, keep reading below.

Continue Reading

Every five years, Congress passes legislation known as the Farm Bill that sets policy for our nation’s agriculture, nutrition and conservation. After being without a bill for the last two years due to Congressional differences, Congress recently approved the latest version of the Farm Bill. One of the most important components the new bill provides is consistency to the planning process, allowing producers to determine their probable cash flows and insurance coverage levels for the years ahead.

There are two major issues that arise with the new bill that require careful consideration for farm financial planning. Both of these issues can have a material impact on revenue streams and, consequently, on producers’ ability to cover debt payments and input costs in the coming years.

1)      elimination of direct payments

  • These were based on the number of acres farmers owned and not on the condition of their crops.
  • Impact on future cash flows: In many cases this may not be material, but in some cases where new increased debt levels may have stressed cash flows and debt coverage, this reduction in total income can have a serious, detrimental effect.
  • Producers need to work closely with their banks and financial advisors to review the impact of this change in forecasting the adequacy of future cash flows, and determining if changes in debt levels, loan terms or loan structure need to be made to accommodate lower future income levels. This should be done now rather than waiting until next year when the effect has already impacted the banking relationship. Being candid and straightforward with bankers and advisors as to any problems the reduced payments may potentially bring to operations will be critical for producers and their short- and long-term financial planning.

2)      new coverage types and levels for crop insurance

  • Now that there are no more direct payments, crop insurance will become the foundation of the new bill.
  • Producers immediately need to determine which option will work best for their individual farms. Farmers now have the option between two new insurance programs – Price Loss Coverage or Agriculture Risk Protection.
  • Price Loss Coverage pays the farmer or producer when the market price for a covered crop is below a fixed reference price.
  • Agriculture Risk Protection – makes payments to farmers when either the farm’s revenue from all crops or the county’s revenue for a crop is below 86 percent of a predetermined benchmark level of revenue.
  • In most situations, the best way to make the irrevocable selection between the two program options is to review how the options would have impacted specific farming operations throughout the last several years. By looking at several years, or by forecasting crop rotations into the next five years when possible, producers can determine which option will provide the best insurance coverage under a variety of potential circumstances.

Careful consideration of future operations, past insurance costs and coverage, and required levels of risk mitigation can yield significant improvement to overall farm income in the years ahead. Taking proactive steps to evaluate these areas with bankers and financial advisors will be critical in establishing a strategic plan and achieving the best outcomes financially possible for farming operations.

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Watson serves as president of the UMB Agribusiness Division. He joined UMB in August of 2005 and has also served as the president of the UMB Kansas region. Watson is a graduate of Wabash College in Crawfordsville, Indiana with a major in Psychology. He has also attended The Colorado School of Banking, The National Commercial Lending School (where he has also been an instructor), and the Stonier Graduate School of Banking.



Leave a Comment

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , ,