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Meet the Leadership Series: CFO Brian Walker

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Q&A with Brian Walker

UMBFC’s new CFO talks about swimming with sharks, putting people first and what it takes to be a CFO.

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What brought you to 2014?

I grew up in the Kansas City area, graduating from Olathe North and then Kansas State University (Go Cats!). The first 13 years of my career started in public accounting with a focus on banking.

I met my wife, Anne, in college, and even though she was a human ecology major, she eventually saw the appeal of the financial industry and is now a successful tax accountant.

We have two sons, Alex is 7 and Chase is 9. The latest craze in our house is Go Fish.

Given your line of work, do you think you emphasize allowance and budgeting more than the average parent?

My portion of the homework is the math, and my wife helps with English. Beyond just homework help, l want to teach my kids basic money skills while they’re still young. Lack of financial education could be the downfall of America. So passing along my passion and knowledge of finances is a parenting goal of mine.

What makes a CFO great?

Focusing on people first. I’m naturally inclined to think about process, controls and procedures and how to improve them. But I try to push against that inclination and focus on my team first. I can’t do anything without my team. So my job is to continue to look for strategic ways to improve processes while developing and supporting my teams.

And of course you have to have patience and a good sense of humor.

What is the greatest challenge facing CFOs in the financial industry in 2014?

Compliance. Our second full-time job is complying with regulations. Risk management has always been important for CFOs, but it is even more of a priority in 2014. We have to balance risk management while looking at today’s environment and figure out how to continually meet the needs of a diverse set of stakeholders. How do we strategically reconcile those needs all the while providing the Unparalleled Customer Experience and maintaining a competitive stance in this industry?

What advice do you have for others that aspire to become CFO?

There’s nothing different about me than a lot of people on my team. The only difference is years of experience. They can all accomplish the same things. My advice is to find good coaches and mentors. Be open to criticism. Be willing to fail and learn from it.

If you ever want to BE your boss, take work off of their plate. I strive to be grounded and understand that I’m not magical. I’m not any better than anyone else who has come or gone. 

Where is your favorite place to travel?

The islands. Any of them. I am an avid SCUBA diver, and have dived everywhere from the Pacific to the Atlantic, Hawaii to the Caribbean. I learned to dive in the U.S. Virgin Islands while I was auditing a bank in St. Croix.

diving with sharks

 


Mr. Walker is the Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accounting Officer at UMB Financial Corporation. He joined UMB in 2007. He earned a Business Administration (Accounting) degree at Kansas State University and his Masters of Business Administration degree at Rockhurst University. In addition to his involvement with several community and charitable organizations, he is also the treasurer for the Big Bash Foundation, a not-for-profit foundation focused on providing financial assistance and increasing visibility for local not-for-profit organizations.



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Mariner Kemper – 2014 Chairman of the Board of the American Royal

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Mariner Kemper is taking the reins of the America Royal. He will be continuing a family tradition of involvement in this organization with his father, R. Crosby Kemper, Jr. serving as chair in 1991 and 1992. The building itself, Kemper Arena, was named in honor of Mariner’s grandfather, R. Crosby Kemper, Sr. Below is an excerpt from his speech at Tuesday’s annual meeting.

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Mariner Kemper Addresses the American Royal

It is truly an honor to continue the tradition of The American Royal. The mission of The American Royal is—

To promote and celebrate the excellence in agricultural progress and to develop future generations of leaders through agrarian values.

My personal interest in this mission dates back to the lessons I learned from my father. My childhood and adolescent memories are filled with a connection to land, nature, animals and getting your hands dirty.

Sure they wore suits and ties, worked in office buildings, and helped people manage their money – the RIGHT way. But at the end of the day, and most Saturday afternoons – ties were replaced by hats, hallways replaced by fences and ceilings became the blue sky.

My father truly loved the American Royal as did his father before him. I share that love and understanding of the agrarian lifestyle and values.

The example of Eisenhower

This philosophy really hit home this past Thanksgiving as I was reading the biography of President Eisenhower by Stephen Ambrose.

President Eisenhower. Here’s a man who served as Supreme Commander in Chief of World War II and President of the United States. And when he could find time to take a break from serving our nation, what did he do? He returned to his roots in Abilene, Kansas. Put on his boots, saddled a horse, talked about the weather and last year’s alfalfa crop, and voiced his opinion on John Deere vs. International Harvester. He put himself in an environment that he believed in:  the values, the sensibility and self-reliance born from an agrarian lifestyle. He embraced and understood the work ethic and ambition that is formed from living off the land. And then carried those principles and experiences in leading people and our nation to peace and prosperity.

I believe we need to “act like Ike,” as many have said before. Lead with that work ethic and ambition. Self-reliance. Values matter.

State of The American Royal

Today, The American Royal enters the 115th year of serving and celebrating agriculture. And the core of our mission is to support the future of agriculture. We cannot, and must not, lose sight of this purpose to serve current and future generations. Every year we are introduced to some of these inspirational leaders, The Royal Scholars, and are captivated by their accomplishments and what is important to them.

It’s motivating.

And when we listen to them, it’s not about their farm, their town, their county or their state. Their vision is about our future and our country – and this reinforces what The American Royal stands for.

The American Royal is not an isolated activity for Kansas City or the Midwest. It is the AMERICAN Royal. You can build a case that every person, every company, every community is touched by and obligated to play a role in our agriculture system. After all, our economy and livelihood are reliant on a functional and safe agricultural system.

We are lucky to have such a rich ag history in Kansas City that gives us the platform to not only provide leadership but to celebrate what Kansas City and our surrounding regions mean to our national food and agrarian culture.

As Greg Maday once coined, the American Royal is truly Kansas City’s most authentic asset. Every city has a performing arts center. Every city has a football team, but there are only a handful of cities in America that have something as special as the American Royal.

The American Royal is a critical piece in that food chain. We have done a great job as a supporter and advocate of agriculture throughout the years. The American Royal livestock shows, rodeos, educational programs, scholarships and world-famous barbecues are a foundation we all can take pride in.

Our Barbecue is the world’s largest, but in my opinion, it is still Kansas City’s best kept secret. When visitors come to town, what’s the first thing they want to do? Hit up a world-famous Kansas City barbecue joint. We have a better reputation nationally than we recognize locally. We are continually listed on every Best Barbecue list and the Food Network does regular exposés on Kansas City barbeque. The American Royal barbecue should be THE event in Kansas City. It’s one of our best assets.

And now is the time to think and act deeper than our roots and beyond our fences. But before we do that, we must have a heightened focus on cultivating our community. It is essential for us to involve a broader base of individual, civic and corporate support for The American Royal.

We need to act and think like Louisville, Kentucky when it comes to the Kentucky Derby. Or like Austin, Texas when it comes to the South by Southwest Festival. Or Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Those communities not only rally around the purpose–they also captivate the attention and participation of people throughout the U.S. and internationally.

And that’s what we need to do. That’s what we CAN do. The American Royal is valuable, unique and important—and it’s up to all of us to make sure others have the opportunity to know the purpose it serves and the benefits it provides.  This will be part of our mission for 2014, and we need your help to make it happen.

The American Royal in 2014

Many believe no other city in the U.S. can claim an agricultural history as rich as Kansas City’s. From Lewis & Clark, to The Oregon Trail to one of the country’s biggest railway hubs, Kansas City has served as a focal point for transporting grains, animals and freight. A recent report estimated the total value of freight handled within the Kansas City area each year is more than $800 billion. 

Thanks in large part to the entrepreneurial vision of Kansas City Southern Railway, Kansas City has direct access to markets throughout the southern U.S., Mexico and the Pacific region.

This intersection of transportation and commerce has fueled entrepreneurial opportunities established by the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce’s Big 5 initiative. In fact, Kansas City has now established a global reputation as the center of the Animal Health Industry, and hosts several important international animal health conferences every year.

Given this, here are my three priorities for 2014:

  1. Capitalize on location in the Heartland – We have an opportunity to rally around what is unique in Kansas City and become recognized nationally. I also want to expand scholarship and educational activities.
  2. Secure broader engagement and endorsement from corporate and civic leadership – The impact of the American Royal is undeniable. Compared to the MLB All-Star Game that brought $60 million to the local economy ONCE, the American Royal does this every year. We need to remind the community of this impact to engage more advocates. Our ultimate goal is for the entire city to feel ownership of the American Royal.
  3. And finally, create a collaboration between Kansas City and American Royal for new facility – A new facility will breathe new life into the American Royal and agriculture. The American Royal will remain the inspiration for the future of agriculture. Rather, it will SAVE the city money. All while catering to constituents, community and ag-related interests from across the country.

As we look to the future, our role is not to defend The American Royal, but rather to promote it and build excitement for what we offer. We have an obligation and a responsibility before us.

President Eisenhower once said, Whatever America hopes to bring to pass in the world must first come to pass in the heart of America.

Well America, here we are. The American Royal. 


Mr. Kemper is the chairman and chief executive officer of UMB Financial Corporation and UMB Bank, n.a. He joined UMB in 1997. Mr. Kemper is active in both civic and philanthropic endeavors. One of the causes he is most passionate about is the arts. He currently serves as a trustee and executive committee member for the Denver Art Museum and is a past board member for The Arts Council of Metropolitan Kansas City.



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This February: Don’t be silent – GO RED

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Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women and is more deadly than all forms of cancer combined. And, if that statistic isn’t startling enough, consider that heart disease causes one in three women’s deaths each year, killing approximately one woman every minute.

As the co-chair of the American Heart Association 2014 Go Red For Women Campaign, I am committed to educating as many people as possible about ways to reduce and end heart disease. 

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We all have women we hold close to our hearts. Whether it is a mother, daughter, wife, sister, cousin, or friend, they all deserve to know the life-saving knowledge about heart disease and how to prevent it. There are several false assumptions that people believe such as: heart disease is only for older people, it doesn’t affect women that are physically fit, and that it’s more of a ‘man’s’ disease than for women. The fact is that these are nothing more than myths.

This month, I’m asking all women and their loved ones to encourage each other to join the Go Red For Women movement. Started more than a decade ago, the Go Red For Women Movement has saved more than 650,000 women’s lives and counting. Raising awareness through participation in events such as National Wear Red Day®on February 7 is a great way to get the conversation going with those around you. In addition to that event, there are many ways to get involved – find out how here.

And finally, I encourage you to start the journey toward heart disease prevention and education with a focus on YOU first. Knowing your risk and practicing a healthy lifestyle are the first steps to becoming an advocate and an example for the cause. From there, you are set to begin adding to those 650,000 lives already saved. This is your call to action: Go Red!

 

ABOUT GO RED FOR WOMEN

The American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement has been impacting the health of women for 10 years. More than 650,000 women’s lives have been saved, but the fight is far from over. Now is the time to shout louder, stand stronger and demand change. It’s time to come together in a movement that is not just FOR women, but BY women. It’s time for women to Go Red. Visit GoRedForWomen.org for more information or call 1-888-MY-HEART. The American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement is nationally sponsored by Macy’s, with additional support from our cause supporters.

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Dana Abraham is president of the Private Wealth Management Division and is responsible for the delivery of comprehensive financial services to high-net-worth clients. Her areas of focus include Wealth Planning, Private Banking, Personal Trust, Investment Management and Insurance. She joined UMB in 2005 and has more than 20 years of experience in the financial services industry. Abraham earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration with a concentration in both accounting and economics from the University of Louisiana. She is a graduate of Leadership Overland Park and Kansas City Tomorrow Leadership programs.



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Don’t Get Sacked Buying a Big Screen for the Big Game

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The big game is just around the corner and many people are thinking about buying a new big screen. You may think you’re getting a Hail Mary of a deal, but make sure you’re not getting blitzed. Here are some ways to score the TV you want and advance your financial goals down the field.

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  • Your budget is your playbook. Even if you can’t execute every play perfectly, the closer you can stick to your plan, the more points you’ll put up on the board.
  • Plan out your maximum price, the features you want and the size you want.

For example, when you start looking, you may be thinking about buying a 47-inch TV for $700, but then you find a great 47-inch TV marked down to $500. Then the helpful sales associate says that they have a 50-inch marked down from $1,000 to $750. They say that with the bigger TV you save 300 dollars instead of 250 and you’re still under your budget.

Watch out: they’re going for an interception!

If you have a budget and you spend the full amount, you did not save any money. You were never going to buy the $1,000 dollar 50-inch TV. When you came in the store, you were thinking you’d be happy with the 47-inch model. Remember the play you’re running, buy the size you originally wanted and you’ll have another $250 to put towards saving. 

  • In the NFL, players will watch hours of game tapes to learn about the other team. Do your homework by checking out customer reviews or other trusted sources.
  • That helpful sales associate may also offer you no payments or no interest for months. But even the worst referee would call a flag on this play. These deals often take the form of deferred interest, so if you don’t pay back the full amount in the given time frame, you could owe interest for the entire length of time. Every loan and credit card is different, so be sure to read the fine print before you sign on the dotted line. You may gain 10 yards on the play, but paying a high interest rate can set you back worse than a 15 yard penalty.

Remember, buying a TV is just one play in one game. For saving money, the season never ends. NFL players train their entire life to get to the big game. We save money our entire life to get to retirement. Don’t let spending sideline you. 


John R. Moreau is a product manager for Consumer Loans and Deposits at UMB Financial Corporation. He joined UMB in 2008. Moreau earned a Bachelor of Science from Arizona State University and a Master’s in Economics from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Economics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.



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Navigating through the “sandwich years” (Hometown Perspective: Warsaw, Mo.)

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My husband and I are very proud of our three children who are currently in various stages of college. We’re also blessed to have some of our parents still with us. We’re in the midst of the “sandwich years.” Our children are transitioning into adulthood and our parents are dealing with the prospect of additional – and often much higher – health care costs.

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The situation certainly isn’t new, but the financial challenges of this particular age group have recently changed. In addition to your retirement fund(s) likely taking significant losses during the financial crisis, those of us currently in the sandwich years also face the financial challenges of our children and parents. Our kids are graduating into an extremely difficult job market, while our parents are dealing with the rising costs of health care on a fixed income. With these challenges, sometimes our parents and kids may need our help financially.

Don’t wait until you and your family are faced with these issues to begin dealing with them. Usually if a financial emergency occurs, you won’t have much time before you have to act. In my thirty plus years at UMB, I have seen customers in the middle of these transition years who haven’t had important discussions with their kids or their parents soon enough. Living in an area with a high concentration of retirees, I’ve seen countless children of senior parents who have waited too long to talk to them about their financial plans.

So what can you do to plan for the sandwich years?

Prepare your children for financial independence by:

  • Opening a college fund as soon as possible (your kids don’t have to be burdened with student loan repayments while they work to become financially stable).
  • Teaching them the foundation of financial responsibility at an early age.
  • Encouraging them to hold part-time jobs as teenagers to develop a strong work ethic early on, and learn the benefit of saving and budgeting.

Prepare your parents for the issues they will face by:

  • Having an open dialogue about their overall financial situation, while being respectful of their privacy and wishes.
  • Approaching the sensitive subjects of having a will, power of attorney and health care directive. They are difficult conversations, but it’s better to have them early. It is much harder to discuss finances when failing health and/or mental incapacity have occurred.

Prepare yourself for the sandwich years by:

  • Talking regularly with your financial advisor about what you need to do to prepare for your own retirement.
  • Creating an emergency fund. You don’t want to dip into your retirement fund if something should happen and your kids or parents need financial help.

The sandwich years can be very stressful but that stress can be greatly reduced if you plan ahead. Prepare your children to become financially independent young adults and ensure your parents have a financial plan for their senior years. And don’t forget to make your own financial preparations. Your children will thank you for it when they reach their sandwich years.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Porter is senior vice president and financial center manager for the Eastgate location in Warsaw, Mo. She joined UMB in 1981. Ms. Porter is responsible for managing the consumer sales and functions of that location and has been involved in many other areas of the bank in her thirty-two years with UMB. Actively involved in the community, she has worked closely with the Warsaw High School vocal and instrumental departments for many years. She is a trustee of the Mary Lay Scholarship Fund, currently serves on the Harbor Village Fund fundraising committee and is a board member of the Warsaw Area Chamber of Commerce.



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This year, resolve to think small

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Every year, we make resolutions. We dream of all the goals we want to achieve and the objectives we want to accomplish. And every year, life gets in the way. We resolve this will be the year we get in shape, but our resolve freezes in the January cold. We pledge that this will be the year we get organized, but our goal gets lost among the clutter. We swear that this will be the year we start saving for retirement, but our budget runs short as bills loom large.

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Soon, our resolutions fall aside as we try to keep up with the day to day. Our problems seem so big and our time so small. There is so much to do, so many problems to solve. What can we do? Where should we start? How can we even get started? Every year, our resolutions crumble and our problems remain.

This year, don’t try to solve the big problems.

This year, resolve to think small.

Yes, small. Small is beautiful. Small is doable. Small is possible.

If you want to save money, don’t think “I want to save for retirement.” Saving for retirement is a lifelong goal, not something you can do in a year.  Instead, start small. First, ask yourself if you have an emergency fund. Everyone should save at least 3-6 months’ worth of income for emergencies.  If you do not have any savings, 3-6 months of income can seem like a lot. Don’t try to save it all at once. Ask yourself what you can do.

Can you save 10 percent of January’s pay? Or maybe just $100 dollars?

Find an amount that you believe you can save. Every payday, take half of that goal amount and put it in a Savings account. Then, in February, ask yourself if you can increase how much you save. If you saved $100 in January, can you save $120 in February? That’s only $10 more per paycheck, $5 per week. It’s only one less fast food meal, one less trip to Starbucks. Think about the small expenses. Every time you cut back a little more, you can save that much more. Keep it up and soon you’ll have an emergency fund saved.

No matter what your goals are for 2014, know that every small step counts toward accomplishing your goal.


John R. Moreau is a product manager for Consumer Loans and Deposits at UMB Financial Corporation. He joined UMB in 2008. Moreau earned a Bachelor of Science from Arizona State University and a Master’s in Economics from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Economics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.



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The Plan in Planned Giving

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Planned giving can be an important tool when planning for the future of your estate. Some may have a desire to give to non-profit organizations, including their alma mater, a medical research project or a favorite youth organization. Whatever your desire, make sure you work with an experienced financial partner that can help guide you through the process to ensure your goals can be met.

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First, what constitutes a meaningful gift?

Quite simply, any gift is a meaningful gift. Many people are under the impression that only the very wealthy can be philanthropic. However, this is not the case. Gifts of any size are greatly appreciated by non-profit organizations, especially now as economic challenges have affected many individuals’ ability to donate while the needs continue to grow.

Motivations for gifting

The reasons for gifting vary greatly depending on the individual. Compassion for those in need, an extension of a religious or spiritual commitment, desire to share good fortune with others and memorializing the lives of others are some of the most prevalent reasons for planned gifts. You should personally evaluate your motivation and goals, and keep them in mind when determining how and when you want to support a cause.

Selecting the “right” organization

There are many worthy organizations, and choosing the non-profit that best fits your giving intentions is extremely important. Once your inspiration for giving has been clearly identified, make a short-list of potential groups. Organizations should be carefully researched and vetted to ensure you are comfortable with the final decision. It’s important to learn about a specific topic or organization, so your philanthropy can be used in a meaningful way. Once one or more organizations have been selected, a financial partner can help you define your vision, determine how the gift will be distributed and then evaluate, when possible, how the gift has been used.

Gift Options

Another item to consider is the type of gift you may want to give. Many organizations have gift acceptance policies, which may exclude certain types of donations. Things like stocks, real estate, art or other items may be quite valuable, but you should have a conversation with the organization first to ensure they are able to accept these types of gifts.  

Planned giving is an extremely meaningful and personal investment. Taking the time to evaluate these types of questions can really help individuals and organizations make the most of charitable gifts.


Jan Leonard is senior vice president and managing director for charitable trusts, private foundations and fine art services. She joined UMB in 2003 and has more than 25 years of experience in the management of private and public organizations. Leonard earned a bachelor’s degree from Arkansas Tech University and a master’s degree in business administration from Ottawa University in Ottawa, Kan. She is also a graduate of the Cannon School of Foundation Management.



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In memory

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It is with profound sorrow that I share the passing of my father, R. Crosby Kemper, Jr., chairman emeritus of UMB Financial Corporation. He passed away yesterday.

My father had a tremendous influence on the growth and vitality of UMB and on so many businesses throughout the Midwest. He was a man of great intellect, integrity and values, and was an inspiration to all that had the pleasure to know him. He also leaves a profound legacy of contributions to civic and charitable causes related to his beloved Kansas City. His business acumen and personal generosity were evident in all that he did. 

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To help pay tribute, there is a legacy site, rcrosbykemperjr.com, that has been created to honor him. The site includes his biography, photos, videos and extensive personal history. And while there is no possible way to truly convey who he was and the contributions he made, I believe this site provides a glimpse of that, clearly showing he lived every day to the fullest and that this world is a better place because of him.

Also, if you have a favorite memory of my dad that you would like to share, you can post this on UMB Bank’s Facebook page or send an email to condolences@umb.com.

Our family thanks you for your support and thoughts during this difficult time.

Sincerely,

Mariner 


Mr. Kemper is the chairman and chief executive officer of UMB Financial Corporation and UMB Bank, n.a. He joined UMB in 1997. Mr. Kemper is active in both civic and philanthropic endeavors. One of the causes he is most passionate about is the arts. He currently serves as a trustee and executive committee member for the Denver Art Museum and is a past board member for The Arts Council of Metropolitan Kansas City.



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Happy New Year

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Best wishes for a healthy, happy and prosperous 2014!

Happy New Year

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UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Target Credit/Debit Card Security Breach

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You may have seen the recent news that Target experienced a breach in electronic security‡ with their customers’ debit and credit cards. While UMB has security protocols in place, we ask that you remain vigilant as well. You can use our online or mobile banking options to check balances and transaction history 24/7. If you see any suspicious activity on your account, please contact our customer service associates as soon as possible. That number is 800.821.5184.

Credit card

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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