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Meet the Leadership Series: Rich Voreis (Marquette Transportation Finance)

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Q&A with Rich Voreis (President, Marquette Transportation Finance)

Get to know UMB’s leadership a little better.

Rich Voreis Rich Voreis

Tell us about yourself!

I’m an Illinois farm boy—I grew up outside of Chicago. The family farm traces its beginning back to the 1860s when it was homesteaded by my great-great grandfather, a German immigrant. I graduated from the University of Illinois and have had many tough seasons of football and basketball to endure as a sports fan. Speaking of basketball, the Harlem Globetrotters played their first away game in my hometown of Hinckley. My claim to fame is that while in grade school, I played basketball in the same gym that game was played in.

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My first job out of college was in baby product sales for Johnson & Johnson where I ended up being a key accounts manager for the Kansas City market. Many, many years later I’ve returned to Kansas City as a UMB associate.
Rich Voreis Marie and Rich Voreis
My wife, Marie, and I met in the Twin Cities, raised our children there and have now been married 33 years. Our children are:  Aaron, 36, Adam, 31, and Angie, 28. Thanks to Aaron, I’m now a grandpa, and Adam will be married soon! As our children grew up, we enjoyed many vacations and memories, including ski trips, cruises and cultural events.

What about your past shaped who you are today? Rich Voreis

My farmer parents laid a great foundation of who I am today. They, like many of their generation, instilled a strong work ethic, honesty, love and the importance of helping your neighbor because it’s the right thing to do. But that foundation alone didn’t shape who I am today. Experiences along the way have provided life lessons to mature that foundation.

What are your favorite ways to give back?
 

While our children were in school, Marie and I were very active in parent associations. Lately, I’ve been involved in a local nonprofit, Project for Pride in Living, Project for Pride in Living works with lower-income individuals and families to achieve greater self-sufficiency through housing, employment training, support services and education.

Where is your favorite place to travel?
Rich Voreis
I enjoy new people and new places, so my favorite place to go is somewhere I haven’t been. While I’ve experienced a fair amount of travel outside the UnitedStates, my bucket list of places includes Asia, Northern Europe and South America.

Marquette Transportation Finance

Tell us about your vision for transportation finance at UMB.

Marquette Transportation Finance (MTF), and its division Marquette Commercial Finance, provide flexible and responsive working capital financing to mid-market and small businesses across the nation. By providing an alternative source to traditional bank financing, MTF assists businesses in meeting their working capital needs to drive growth, fund acquisitions, improve liquidity and fund restructures. We routinely serve as a bridge lender for businesses until they are able to obtain traditional bank financing.

My team’s vision now that we are a part of UMB is to continue to foster our goal to be a best-in–class financer in our industry. MTF’s and UMB’s cultures are the same in that MTF has embraced the unparalleled customer experience since we were founded in 2002. Beyond the great culture fit, the strength and backing of UMB as a financial institution provides us with the opportunity to excel in the marketplace. We are now able to reach a larger audience due to the increased lending capacity and resources that UMB affords us.

What does your team do differently?  

At MTF, our team has a deep understanding of the transportation industry and its nuances, which allows us to walk the talk, so to speak, on providing great customer service. The industry knowledge of the team helps us tailor financing for each client, and we work hard to understand our clients’ business. We know many individuals, businesses and shippers in the industry, so we can also help make connections that assist our customers’ operationally.

Beyond service and professionalism, our business model is structured so we can manage risk very well and can act quickly when reviewing financing needs. While we are backed by the larger UMB, MTF’s office is nimble enough that we can truly provide one-on-one attention.

What is the greatest challenge facing the transportation industry right now?

The greatest challenge facing our industry now is a lack of strong loan demand coupled with a very competitive marketplace. Loan demand is cyclical and tied to the general overall economy. I anticipate it will pick up in the future as the economy moves, whether up or down

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Rich Voreis is the president for UMB Bank’s subsidiary, Marquette Transportation Finance, which also operates the division Marquette Commercial Finance. He is responsible for their overall management and growth. He joined UMB in 2015 with the Marquette acquisition and has 35 years of experience in the financial services industry.



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Meet the Veterans: Gregory Coopwood

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UMB is fortunate to have several veterans on our team and are proud to hire veterans in our local communities. This series highlights some of our associates who have served their country in the military prior to joining UMB. Be sure to check out the other profiles in our series.

Q&A with Gregory Coopwood, Paralegal Specialist, United States ArmyGregory Coopwood UMB

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Tell us about yourself
I’m originally from Woodbridge, Va., which is about 25 minutes outside of Washington, D.C. I attended and played football at Missouri State University. My journey is a little bit interesting because I applied for college and talked with the football coaches at Missouri State while I was deployed in Iraq. It’s amazing how supportive some people are in helping others achieve their goals. I have three sisters, Emily, Kimberly and Olivia, so growing up being the only boy has had its challenges with what to watch on TV!
Gregory Coopwood Missouri State University football
What about your past shaped who you are today?
I had a great upbringing by both of my parents. My father passed away in January 2014, but the values and character he nurtured in me have molded who I am as a man. Also, the fact that my family was so involved with sports in and out of school really improved my self-awareness and confidence.

My dad made the biggest difference in my life. Being the only boy, he made sure that he and I had a strong relationship. My best childhood memories are of my dad waking me up at 4 a.m. to take me to work with him. It was those truck rides where he talked to me about manhood, preparing for a family, values and character. One of the biggest things he taught me was how important it is to have communication in relationships. I wouldn’t be who I am today if it had not been for such a strong man in my life. 

Why did you join the military?
I chose to join the military because I wanted to make a difference. My mindset was “I’m doing this because I want my future family to continue to be free.” It was a contribution that I desired to give and be a part of.

Give us some highlights about your military career.
Gregory Coopwood United States Army
I was part of “Operation Iraqi Freedom” and “Operation New Dawn,” so I was able to see the transition of an 11-year operation ending and a new one beginning.

My favorite moment was sitting in a plane on the way home after my deployment to Iraq. I kept thinking to myself, “I made it, I kept my promise…I made it”. When I walked into the pick-up area, I saw my family there waiting for me. I’ve never felt so proud but so weak at the same time before, because when I finally saw my family, I knew that I really made it through.

What are the greatest challenges that someone leaving the military and entering a new career faces?
A great challenge is having patience because people don’t understand the mindset a soldier has. A lot of people interpret a soldier’s discipline in certain areas as communication gaps. The maturity is different, and nothing will bother a soldier more than being late to something.

What are your favorite ways to give back in the community?
I’ve recently joined the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kansas City, and I look forward to being a mentor and being there for someone who needs a big brother. A lot of people complain about how the world is changing and speak negatively. My question to those people is simply, “What are you doing about it?” More than likely, the people complaining are not volunteering or applying themselves to make a difference. So I don’t talk about making a difference that often, but I like to go out and do it.

Where is your favorite place to travel?
My favorite place to travel will always be to the east coast. That’s where my entire family is, and that is where I was raised. It’s always a great feeling to go home and drive on the road you’ve traveled hundreds of time and reminisce about the past. Something that I always look forward to eating is my mom’s well-known potato salad. It’s something that can make a bad day great.

What are your favorite ways to spend a weekend?
As of right now I don’t know the city that well, but I am learning. Weekends are spent for the most part working out and relaxing. I have a nice 55-inch TV that is neglected throughout the week, so I try to spend some time with it when I can. My hobbies are anything that deals with sports and fitness, and if food is a hobby then food as well. 

How did you come to be at UMB? What made you want to work here? Rebecca Christie, Vice President/Talent Acquisition Specialist, and Ryan Gardner, Fraud Risk Manager, are the reasons why I am at UMB. Originally I was going to be a federal investigator; however, Rebecca stopped me at a career fair at Missouri State University. She saw my résumé and explained to me about the UMB Emerging Leaders Program. She then connected me with Ryan, who is also a veteran. The two of them completely sold me on the culture that I had to experience it for myself. When I came to Kansas City for my interviews, the first thing I noticed was the Diversity and Inclusion trophies. I was continuously greeted and welcomed in a loving way, making me feel like family before I even had an interview. Thankfully, I was accepted, and here I am. The culture at UMB is like nothing I’ve seen before, and I am privileged to be a part of this organization.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Gregory Coopwood is an Emerging Leader Associate for UMB. He joined UMB in June 2015.



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Economic forecast 2016: the tortoise or the hare?

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We all know of Aesop’s fable The Tortoise and the Hare—a story of two unequal opponents who agree to a race. The outcome appears to be obvious, but in a surprising twist, the ever-so-diligent tortoise perseveres and wins the race. The moral of the story is: slow and steady wins the race.

UMB’s economic theme for 2016 is The Tortoise OR the Hare. We think the U.S. economy, which has grown throughout the past few years at a tortoise-like pace, will continue to produce mediocre growth in 2016. Given the stimuli that abounds, one might think the economy should grow at a faster pace, more “hare-like;” however, we think slow and steady will win out once again. We anticipate the U.S. economy will continue to grow in the 2 percent to 2.2 percent range in 2016. Relative to other economies, tortoise-like growth will be a winner.

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hareThe hare
Historically the U.S. economy has been more hare-like. So what has changed? When did our economy go from consistently growing more than 3 percent annually to a tortoise-like economy with growth less than 2.5 percent? For example, from 1955 to 2005, the U.S. average real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was 3.4 percent. Fast-forward to the period from 2005 to 2015 and real GDP averaged a paltry 1.5 percent, leaving economists wondering what happened.

To answer this question, we investigated two economic variables that drive potential GDP: labor force growth and productivity gains.

two economic variables that drive potential GDP: labor force growth and productivity gainsData Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis

Labor force growth
In economics, potential output refers to the highest level of real GDP (output) that can be sustained over the long term. Year-to-year actual GDP may vary from potential GDP; this is called the output gap. Forecasting potential GDP should be relatively easy, as the formula is simply labor force growth plus productivity gains.
low labor force growth + low productivity gains

2016 forecast GDP

Labor force growth has changed throughout the years and is influenced by several factors. In the 1960s and 1970s labor force growth changed due to population growth, the baby boomer generation reached working age and more women were working outside the home and entering the labor force. However, the significant labor force growth rate increase of the 70s will not be repeated anytime soon. One reason is that most baby boomers have more siblings than children, and labor force growth is partly a function of population growth.

Productivity
The second variable is productivity, or the efficiency of production. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, productivity change in the non-farm business sector from 2007-2014 was only 1.3 percent.

Debate among economists: What drives productivity?

  • Capital accumulation or…
  • accelerating technical progress in high-tech industries plus the resulting investment in information technology

One common theme between both theories is that investment is critical to any growth theory. Therefore monitoring measures of human capital and research and development expenditures is necessary. We believe we will continue to see exciting new technologies developed in the future, but caution that even though new technology is introduced, the lack of adoption to these new technologies can be limiting to productivity. Therefore, we don’t see productivity gains spiking higher in the near future.

tortoiseThe tortoise
So as the fable goes, the tortoise never gives up—it is patient and persistent, and wins the race. This is a great parallel to the U.S. economy in 2016 and perhaps beyond. Our economy has been slow-growing since the Great Recession in 2009 and has continued on that path to real GDP of 1.5 percent in 2013, 2.4 percent in 2014 and near 2.4 percent last year.

I expect our economy to continue to grow at a slow and steady pace in 2016 with real GDP in the range of 2 percent to 2.2 percent. This is in part due to several tailwinds and a few headwinds.

 

GDP economic growth

Tailwinds
The labor market, consumer confidence and low interest rates are a few of the positive variables that support our expectation for steady, ongoing economic expansion.

The robust labor market gives us confidence that the U.S. economy will continue to grow at a steady pace. By the end of 2015, the number of full-time workers rose to a record high of 122.6 million. The Federal Reserve Chairperson, Janet Yellen, suggested in her recent testimony that payroll growth of 100,000 per month can absorb all of the new entrants into the labor market.

Additional data supports a solid labor market. The median duration for the unemployed fell to 10.5 weeks, the lowest in seven years. Finding part-time workers is becoming more difficult, and as the job market improves, we think more people will be encouraged to consider seeking employment. As the labor market tightens, wages will be on the rise as well.

unemployment

Data Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

This dovetails into consumer confidence. When consumers feel good, they will support the economy by spending. Consumer confidence was relatively flat throughout 2015, but remains at a level that supports economic growth. Confidence is primarily driven by the labor market, stock prices and home prices.

The strength in the aforementioned labor market, paired with home prices up 5.5 percent last year, should continue to support confidence. Lower oil prices also gave most consumers a good feeling as their transportation costs were reduced. The wild card here is the stock market. Investors saw mediocre returns last year, (only 1.4 percent return from the S&P 500), along with higher volatility. Weak markets and an increase in volatility may shake consumer confidence this year.

The Fed has kept interest rates low for seven years. We think interest rates will be on the rise throughout 2016, ending the year at 1 percent. However, from a historical perspective, the Fed policy remains extremely expansionary, affording consumers and businesses access to inexpensive capital.

Perhaps China is getting a bad rap; it seems to be blamed for any problem ranging from stock market volatility to global warming. However from our point of view, it’s not all bad. The U.S. imports more goods from China than from any other country. As China devaluates its currency, the yuan, those everyday goods we import become cheaper, which is good for consumers. As their economy slows to a more sustainable level, the demand for energy and commodities wanes and prices are reduced. Again, this is good for the U.S. consumer.

8

Data source: U.S. Census Bureau

Not everything outside of the U.S. is necessarily a negative story, as some would lead consumers to believe. With low interest rates and a quantitative easing program, Europe could experience economic growth in the 1.5 percent to 2.0 percent range. This may not sound like much, but remember in 2014 they grew at a 0.8 percent pace and last year at 1.5 percent.

Headwinds
It’s not all rosy. Some headwinds lead to slower growth and some may not have a significant impact on our economy directly, but rather they may spook risk markets. Stocks are included in this category.

The recent U.S. manufacturing data is suggesting an oncoming economic contraction. For two quarters now, the ISM Purchasing Managers Index has been below 50, indicating a contraction. The good news is that non-manufacturing data is solidly in growth territory, albeit trending south. The bad news–historically the manufacturing data leads the non-manufacturing data. Once again, we think the current data supports a tortoise-like economy in the United States.

The Fed has a tough job: maximize employment, stabilize prices, support global markets, normalize interest rates. Oh, and don’t send us into a recession. Many recessions have been blamed on the Fed for creating a policy error, which is typically viewed as moving too fast or too soon. At this time we don’t see a policy error at hand. The Fed plans to move at a measured pace and it doesn’t look like it will threaten a tortoise-like expansion.

Issues in the global economy will constrain growth in the United States, and as we mentioned, China is slowing. It will have an impact on other emerging markets as well as on the United States to a lesser extent. We don’t believe the Chinese stock market gives us any indication of economic fundamentals due to the speculation in their markets and government intervention. However the massive volatility of their stock markets sends a violent reaction to markets around the globe. If downward pressure continues, it could negatively impact consumer confidence in the United States.

Energy is also an important variable. Even though low energy prices are good for the consumer’s wallet; tension in the Middle East may create an uneasy global economy. And while much of this won’t significantly affect the U.S. economy, it may affect our markets in the short run.

A slow and steady 2016
In 2016 we anticipate GDP growth between 2 percent and 2.2 percent. We think this will be supported by the labor market once again as businesses create new jobs.

Domestic equity returns may once again be challenged, profits are in question and valuations may contract. We expect 3 percent earnings growth which should lead to total returns in the 4 percent to 6 percent range.

We also think interest rates will be on the move this year, expecting both short-term and long-term rates to increase. Fed Funds should end the year at 1 percent.

The moral to our economic story is slow and steady won’t be all bad on a relative basis. Our economy expanding at an approximate 2.1 percent pace will allow the Fed to normalize interest rates and companies will find a way to be profitable and continue to hire workers, supporting consumption.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.

UMB Investment Management is a division within UMB Bank, n.a. that manages active portfolios for employee benefit plans, endowments and foundations, fiduciary accounts and individuals. UMB Financial Services, Inc.*  is a subsidiary of UMB Financial Corporation. UMB Financial Services, Inc is not a bank and is separate from UMB Bank, n.a.

This content is provided for informational purposes only and contains no investment advice or recommendations to buy or sell any specific securities. Statements in this report are based on the opinions of UMB Investment Management and the information available at the time this report was published.

All opinions represent our judgments as of the date of this report and are subject to change at any time without notice. You should not use this report as a substitute for your own judgment, and you should consult professional advisors before making any tax, legal, financial planning or investment decisions. This report contains no investment recommendations and you should not interpret the statements in this report as investment, tax, legal, or financial planning advice. UMB Investment Management obtained information used in this report from third-party sources it believes to be reliable, but this information is not necessarily comprehensive and UMB Investment Management does not guarantee that it is accurate.

All investments involve risk, including the possible loss of principal. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Neither UMB Investment Management nor its affiliates, directors, officers, employees or agents accepts any liability for any loss or damage arising out of your use of all or any part of this report.

“UMB” – Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off. Copyright © 2016. UMB Financial Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Securities offered through UMB Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA, SIPC or the Investment Banking Division of UMB Bank, n.a.

*Insurance products offered through UMB Insurance Inc.

You may not have an account with all of these entities.

Contact your UMB Representative if you have any questions.

* Securities and Insurance products are:

Not FDIC Insured  ▪  No Bank Guarantee  ▪  Not a Deposit  ▪  Not Insured by any Government Agency  ▪  May Lose Value

 

 


K.C. Mathews joined UMB in 2002. As executive vice president and chief investment officer, Mr. Mathews is responsible for the development, execution and oversight of UMB’s investment strategy. He is chairman of the Trust Investment, Asset Allocation and Trust Policy Committees. Mr. Mathews has more than 20 years of diverse experience in the investment industry. Prior to joining UMB, he served as vice president and manager of the portfolio management group at Bank of Oklahoma for nine years. Mr. Mathews earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Notre Dame. Mr. Mathews attended the ABA National Trust School at Northwestern University and is a Chartered Financial Analyst and member of the CFA Institute. He is past president of the Kansas City CFA Society and a past president of the Oklahoma Society of Financial Analysts.



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Asset allocation 101

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Every investor has distinct needs when it comes to building a financial strategy. This means that there’s not one singular, surefire formula investors can follow to create a plan that meets their specific objectives. Every situation is unique and subject to change over time. For that reason, it’s important to recognize that building solutions to meet both short- and long-term goals is a continuous process.
asset allocation

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One of the most important factors in determining how an investment performs over time is asset allocation. To that end, investors who are interested in creating an asset allocation plan that matches their risk tolerance and investment goals can benefit from working with an experienced financial services provider where investors have access to professionals with years of experience and a commitment to thorough and thoughtful analysis in creating custom-tailored solutions.

A guide to asset allocation
But what is asset allocation exactly? According to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, it entails sectioning off an investment portfolio among different asset classes such as stocks, bonds and cash in order to manage risk and add diversification to a portfolio. Basically, asset allocation helps investors avoid placing all of their eggs in one basket. The way you decide to diversify your assets is based on personal preference, life stage, time horizon and risk tolerance. The method by which you allocate assets will shift over time  as markets move and your goals and objectives change.

It is important for investors to always be mindful of the balance between risk and reward when it comes to investing. For example, an aggressive investor may be more willing to accept greater short-term fluctuations in their investments in return for a more rewarding end result in the long-run.  These investors typically have a higher percentage of assets invested in stocks and stock funds. Conservative investors may prefer investments that protect their initial stake, although such investments are less likely to provide a substantial long-term return. Certificates of deposit, money market accounts and high quality bonds or short-term bond funds are a few investments that are typically associated with lower risk. Exchange Traded Funds and Mutual fundsare pooled investment vehicles that are easy and cost efficient ways to diversify a portfolio without buying small positions in many single securities.

In the end, a well thought out, diversified portfolio can help investors manage risk while utilizing investments that work with their time horizon and investment objective. Once this has been established, asset allocation should continually be reviewed to ensure it is both meeting the individual’s needs and providing financial peace of mind.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Filing is a Vice President and Portfolio Manager for UMB Private Wealth Management. He is responsible for all aspects of portfolio construction, including asset allocation, security selection and mutual fund analysis for high-net-worth clients. He joined UMB in 2013 and has 15 years of experience in the financial services industry. Mr. Filing is a Certified Financial Planner® and Chartered Financial Consultant®.



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How People Spend Money On Valentine’s Day

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What’s your favorite way to dote on loved ones for the holiday?

Valentine's Day spending

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UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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Meet the Veterans: Belinda Clapp

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UMB is fortunate to have several veterans on our team and are proud to hire veterans in our local communities. This series highlights some of our associates who have served their country in the military prior to joining UMB. Be sure to check out the other profiles in our series.

Q&A with Belinda Clapp-SSGT United States Air Force Reserves
Belinda Clapp - United States Air Force Reserves

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Tell us about yourself
I was born and raised in Kansas City, and later Grandview, Mo., when I was a teenager. My first job was as a server at Ponderosa in Truman Corners and then McDonald’s.  I am also a proud member of my church’s praise dance team. Family and the love of family is most important to me, and I believe learning new things is key to life and not avoiding boredom.

Tell us about your family
I’m happily married to a wonderful man I met in basic training in Biloxi, Miss, in 1981. We lost touch with each other for at least 25 years until technology led him to search for me. He found me in 2004 and we were married in 2008. We have a blended family; I have four children, and he has five. We are very proud parents of each and every one. I have eight grandkids and one on the way. I have six brothers and sisters, 12 nieces and nephews and 10 great nieces and nephews.
Belinda Clapp familyAnd to make things interesting during baseball and football season, we have a house divided. My husband is from Baltimore, so that means we have issues (especially the loser) when our teams play each other!
Ravens FanChiefs

Why did you join the military?
I chose the military because I was slightly rebellious at the ripe age of 18 and wanted to make this decision on my own instead of having my parents tell me what to do. I hoped they would be proud of me. Also, I participated in the Buddy Program where I got to attend Basic Training with a friend. My other motivation was to cross train for other jobs after my Reserve Duty.

My uncle was a Colonel in the Air Force and working in the Pentagon as an engineer. My admiration for him influenced some of the decisions I had to make about going full time. I felt joining the military would be a life-long experience.

What are some highlights from your time in the Air Force?
Basic Training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio was amazing. I will never forget my time there—getting up at 5 a.m., eating breakfast in a hurry, getting yelled at by a training instructor for laughing in ranks, my one mile run in order to pass the physical part of our training, my duties of sweeping the stairs in the barracks and the dust giving me a bad cough, wearing military cat glasses because you couldn’t wear your own, marching everywhere, all kinds of weather…this list could go on even longer.

When I got home after training at my Tech School in Biloxi as administrative support staff personnel, I worked with the commander for my unit at Richards-Gebaur Air Force Base in Belton, Mo. –the 442nd Tactical Airlift Wing which has now changed to the 442nd Fighter Wing and moved to Whiteman Air Force Base.

During my six-year career as administrative support, part of my duties were to type up everyone’s orders to travel to other bases when it came time for our two-week duty each year. I was able to fly on one of our C-130 Airlift Planes which can be used also as a Medevac plane for patients.

What are your favorite ways to spend a weekend?
Roller skating is a family tradition—all my children were taught how to skate at the age of two and that now carries on to the grandkids. I also enjoy reading, spending time with my husband, finding something new to do in Kansas City and participating in social and church functions.

Where do you like to travel?
Right now it is Baltimore, Md.  It’s my favorite because I still haven’t seen everything. I’m still excited every time I get a chance to go back.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.




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Investment broker vs. investment advisor: who should you choose?

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What’s the difference? Which is better?  

Let me try to clear up some of the confusion. In the investing world, there are two standards of care that can be given by financial service providers: the fiduciary standard and the suitability standard. Before we look at the differences between brokers and advisors, let’s first define the two standards.

The fiduciary standard – Your financial service provider must advise you without conflicts of interest and for your sole benefit as the client they serve, always putting your interests above their own. The fiduciary standard of care was established by the Investment Advisors Act of 1940.

The suitability standard – Your financial service provider must make recommendations consistent with your best interests and in line with your investment objectives and tolerance for risk. Suitability rules are established by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA).

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Some believe that there should be a uniform standard of care. In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, legislators in Washington D.C signed the Dodd-Frank Act into law in July 2010. Part of the act directs the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) to study the need for establishing a new, uniform standard of care for the investment industry. To this day, multiple agencies, industry groups and regulators continue to debate what that standard should be, and there are plenty of arguments for and against a uniform standard. The debate has been going on for years with no resolution. Here’s why: there is not just one right answer.

On its surface, a uniform standard makes perfect sense. In reality, consumers of financial services may need a provider operating under either or both standards and many providers are able to act as both, depending on the needs of the client.

Now, let’s take a look at the difference between advisors and brokers.

Investment advisors

Investment advisors provide a fiduciary standard of care. They give advice on what to invest in and will typically charge a fee for their advice on an ongoing and fully-disclosed basis. It could be either a flat fee or a percentage of your investment assets. Investment advisors are regulated by the SEC and the states in which they do business.

Investment brokers and agents

Investment brokers and insurance agents provide a suitability standard of care. They sell financial products like stocks, bonds, mutual funds, life insurance and annuities. Brokers and agents typically charge a commission on the product they sell or are paid a commission by the product manufacturer. Investment brokers are regulated by FINRA and the states in which they do business. The states also regulate the insurance industry.

So which is better, broker or advisor?

Again, there is no right answer. For example, perhaps you need help with planning for retirement and have a nest egg to invest, but don’t have the time or inclination to invest the money. An investment advisor that can do the planning, choose investments, monitor your portfolio and make changes along the way may be a good choice for you.

Or, maybe you know that you want to buy or sell a stock, bond, mutual fund, buy life insurance, an annuity or even add gold or silver to your portfolio. A broker or agent can help you make the transaction.

Who should you choose?

Depending on your situation and needs, it could be one or the other or both. When searching for a provider, look for a person or firm by clearly communicating your needs:

  • your expectations for service,
  • asking what you will receive,
  • when you’ll receive it and
  • how much it costs.

Many financial firms can provide both brokerage and advisory services, so there are many providers to choose from with varying products, services and service levels. Like anything else you buy, shop around, ask questions and take your time to find the right fit.

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.

 

DISCLOSURE AND IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS:

UMB Private Wealth Management is a division within UMB Bank, n.a. that manages active portfolios for employee benefit plans, endowments and foundations, fiduciary accounts and individuals.  UMB Financial Services Inc * is a wholly owned subsidiary of UMB Bank, n.a. UMB Bank, n.a., is an affiliate within the UMB Financial Corporation. Banking and trust services offered through UMB Private Wealth Management, a division within UMB Bank, n.a.

s/b

UMB Financial Services Inc * is a wholly owned subsidiary of UMB Financial Corp and an affiliate of UMB Bank, n.a.

This report is provided for informational purposes only and contains no investment advice or recommendations to buy or sell any specific securities. Statements in this report are based on the opinions of UMB Private Wealth Management and the information available at the time this report was published.

All opinions represent our judgments as of the date of this report and are subject to change at any time without notice. You should not use this report as a substitute for your own judgment, and you should consult professional advisors before making any tax, legal, financial planning or investment decisions. This report contains no investment recommendations and you should not interpret the statements in this report as investment, tax, legal, or financial planning advice. UMB Private Wealth Management obtained information used in this report from third-party sources it believes to be reliable, but this information is not necessarily comprehensive and UMB Private Wealth Management does not guarantee that it is accurate.

All investments involve risk, including the possible loss of principal. This information is not intended to be a forecast of future events and this is no guarantee of any future results. Neither UMB Private Wealth Management nor its affiliates, directors, officers, employees or agents accepts any liability for any loss or damage arising out of your use of all or any part of this report.

“UMB” – Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off. Copyright © 2012. UMB Financial Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

*Securities offered through UMB Financial Services, Inc. member FINRA, SIPC, or the Investment Banking Division of UMB Bank, n.a.

 

Insurance products offered through UMB Insurance, Inc. You may not have an account with all of these entities. Contact your UMB representative if you have any questions.

Securities and Insurance products are:

NOT FDIC INSURED * NO BANK GUARANTEE * NOT A DEPOSIT * NOT INSURED BY ANY GOVERNMENT AGENCY * MAY LOSE VALUE


Mr. Ellis is the president of UMB Financial Services, Inc., UMB’s securities broker/dealer subsidiary, and UMB Insurance, Inc. He is responsible for strategic planning, products and services, personnel and financial management. He joined UMB in 1996 and has more than 25 years of experience in the financial services industry. Mr. Ellis volunteers his time to not-for-profit organizations needing advice on investment policy and governance issues.



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How to save for a down payment on a home: part II

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Last month we explained how to save for your down payment. Now that you’ve done that, it’s time to focus your plan.saving for a down payment on a homeYou already know that purchasing a home is a substantial investment, and you’ll need to ensure you can afford the monthly mortgage payments. You’ll also need to save up enough money for a down payment and other associated expenses, such as closing costs.

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While you don’t always need to supply a larger down payment due to programs and resources now available for qualified borrowers, the higher your down payment is, the better it is for future finances.  Your monthly mortgage payment will be lower and you may qualify for better rates or terms.

A larger down payment allows you to retain full ownership of the home faster and can save you a substantial sum of money through lower interest rates affixed to mortgages.

Determine a goal 
You should take a look at your finances to determine what kind of home is affordable. A financial expert or mortgage loan consultant can help figure out the best budget for your current financial situation. In addition, online calculators can estimate how much house you can afford. Also, a mortgage loan consultant can look at pre-approving you for a home loan to help determine which loan type you prefer or are qualified for, if mortgage insurance will be required and give you an idea of how much the closing costs and total monthly payment will be.

You can also reach out to real estate agents in the area to ask about the average listing and selling prices of homes in different neighborhoods you’re considering. If you know you want to move to a specific area and homes typically sell for $300,000, you can use that information to tailor a down payment goal specifically to that amount. So, a 20 percent down payment, which is on the high end of the recommended 5 to 20 percent down payment, would equal $60,000.

Do a credit check up
During the pre-approval process, you will be able to have your credit score reviewed to see if there is room for improvement. Be sure to go off of this new credit score since many consumer scores you see on websites are not the same as what a lender uses.

Find ways to save 
We also recommend automatically putting a portion of your paycheck into your savings account. You’ll miss the money less if you don’t get a chance to see it in your checking account in the first place!

Another way to boost a savings account is to work more hours/shifts (for hourly employees) or take on another job. Temporarily increasing total income will help you reach your goal and supply a proper down payment for a dream home.

You can cut down on a number of extra expenses in order to start building up savings, just like you would with any savings goal. Eating dinner out, heading to the movies every weekend and purchasing coffee every morning can really add up.

When saving money for a down payment, you should make a list of all expenses that are required, such as rent, food, clothing and monthly bills. All other extra expenses should be listed in order from most to least costly. By cutting out the most frivolous expenses and trimming the fat from there, you can develop a budget that saves a substantial amount of money.

In addition, replacing certain costs with less expensive ones can help significantly. Here are some ideas for cutting your current living costs:

  • Cancel cable and invest in a more affordable streaming service
  • Create your own vending machine stash of snacks at your desk instead of visiting the machine once a day, save $1/day or $20/month
  • Brew your own coffee, save $4/day or $120/month
  • Cut back on one restaurant visit per week, save $25/week or $100/month
  • Drink glasses of ice water instead of new bottles of water (an environmental choice, too!), save up to $1/day or $30/month
  • Carpool once a week, save $6/week or $24/month
  • Skip one impulse buy, save $40/month
  • Cancel your home landline phone service and just use your cell phone, save $50/month

We don’t expect you to adopt all of those suggestions while you’re saving for your down payment (actually, you probably have a few creative ideas of your own that didn’t make our list). However, if you did incorporate those short-term cuts into your life, you could save $400+ a month and $5,000+ a year!

How do you plan to save for your down payment?

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Jackie Ahumada is a mortgage loan officer with UMB Bank. She has more than 10 years experience in the mortgage industry and more than 18 years in management of customer service delivery and operations.



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Best time to buy – part II

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Saving money this year? Check out this infographic for a full year of great “Buy the Way Wednesday” savings ideas:
Best Time to Buy infographic

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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UMB: Insights – Culture

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What makes UMB stand out from other organizations? Our leadership shares what they believe makes us special in this continuation of our UMB: Insights series.

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UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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