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What entrepreneurs are doing for Kansas City

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Today’s entrepreneurs are as excited as yesterday’s. They’re going to take us into the future and help build a thriving economy in Kansas City.

Here are more of my thoughts on Kansas City as we build the most comprehensive and effective entrepreneurial ecosystem anywhere in America.

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Mr. deSilva is president and chief operating officer of UMB Financial Corporation. He is also vice chairman of UMB Bank, n.a. Mr. deSilva joined UMB in January 2004. He is primarily responsible for UMB's fee-producing business units and product lines, including Scout Investments; UMB Fund Services, UMB Healthcare Services Payment Solutions, Prairie Capital Management. Additionally, he is responsible for all corporate operations, technology, properties, security and marketing.



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Veterans Day

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As we use Veterans Day to honor the many people who have sacrificed for us, we’ve been reflecting on what else we can do to better serve our veterans.

Our new job portal is geared specifically for those with a military background. It’s one way we’re trying to connect with veterans, but like many of you, we’re always looking for ways to thank these service men and women.

What ways have you seen organizations succeed in serving individuals and families connected to the military?

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Mr. Kemper is the chairman and chief executive officer of UMB Financial Corporation and UMB Bank, n.a. He joined UMB in 1997. Mr. Kemper is active in both civic and philanthropic endeavors. One of the causes he is most passionate about is the arts. He currently serves as a trustee and executive committee member for the Denver Art Museum and is a past board member for The Arts Council of Metropolitan Kansas City.



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Financial Word of the Week: Certificate of Deposit

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FWOTW

Certificates of Deposit (CDs) are a type of savings account that generally earns you a higher interest rate than other bank accounts because you are restricted from withdrawals or deposits. You are guaranteed to earn a set interest rate throughout the term of the CD.  Most institutions have CDs that range from 30 days to multiple years. If you do withdraw money from the account, you may have to pay early withdrawal penalties.

CDs were authorized in the 1960s and gained popularity during the inflation period of the 1970s because of their attractive rates. They are also insured under the Federal Deposit Insurance Company (FDIC) guidelines. Given today’s low interest rate environment, you may need to weigh the benefits of being locked into a term. If rates go up, you will be stuck in a low interest rate account or pay the penalties for early withdrawal.

Example
The highest average advertised rate on a one-year CD is 1.00% Annual Percentage Yield (APY). With that rate, it would take you 72 years just to double your money with compounding interest. Or more realistically, if you kept $1,000 in a CD for 10 years, you would only earn approximately $100 in interest. However, if you have a specific goal and time period you’re saving for, then a CD investment could make sense for you.

Next week we’ll explain how to ladder CDs and how it can help you.

 

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Manufacturing and Technology: Attracting a New Workforce

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Last month our expert panelists explained how they find the right employees for their organizations. Now these manufacturing and technology industry leaders tackle the topic of education and attracting the next generation to the workforce.

Kim Maddigan (CEO, AdamWorks) says the industry needs to reintroduce manufacturing as an appealing career option for young people in the United States. The panelists also discuss whether or not internships and job shadowing are a helpful approach.

Panelists:

Jon Kinning, COO, RK Mechanical, Inc.
Kim Madigan, CEO, AdamWorks
Bill Newland, CEO, Hercules Industries
Kevin Fink, CEO, Ice-O-Matic

Moderator:

Bart Taylor, Founder/Publisher, Company Week

Next month, we’ll bring you the panelists’ answers to some frequently asked questions.

 

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Presidential Terms: What does it matter to the economy?

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It’s election day! Last week we gave you our take on the economic impact of midterm elections.

Now let’s talk about the effects of the presidential cycle.

See below for more…

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Elections and the markets
Investors want to know what the midterm election will do to the markets. Historical data tells us that midterm election years are historically poor performing years in the stock markets.

Let’s step back and review the presidential cycle. Here’s what we found from analyzing 142 years of data:

  • worst performing: year two
    • average return of 2.7 percent
  • best performing: year three
    • equity markets gain on average 12.3 percent

One possible reason for the poor performance in the second year of the presidential cycle (which is also the midterm election year) could be that policy makers remove stimulus after a presidential election, leaving  the worst of the restrictive policy in year two of the presidential term.

Does party matter?
I hear many complaints about a Democrat in the White House being bad for business. Of course, everyone has a right to share opinions, but I’ll stick to fact-based data. I make the assumption that stock market returns are a proxy for business conditions. Going back to 1901, using the Dow Jones Industrial Average as a barometer, the best-performing markets have occurred with a democratic president. Further, the average return under a democratic president is 7.9 percent versus 3 percent with a republican president.

What if we are correct and the Republicans control Congress with President Obama in the White House? What can we expect from the equity markets? Historically that separation of control produces the best returns in the Dow. The average return in that scenario has been 9.8 percent. The worst returns – 1.7 percent – have been seen when the Republicans are in total control of Washington.

Perhaps our founding fathers structured it that way, to ensure no single party would have total control, at least not for long. Perhaps the financial markets don’t like abrupt changes and uncertainty. Gridlock ensures nothing will get done quickly and any policy tweaks will be relatively small.

 

We cannot disagree with data, but keep in mind that elections do matter on many fronts. So find a way to tolerate all those campaign ads, and go out and exercise your constitutional right to vote. If there’s any silver lining to having your political party in control of one side and your opposing party the other, remember it may be a good thing for the financial markets.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


K.C. Mathews joined UMB in 2002. As executive vice president and chief investment officer, Mr. Mathews is responsible for the development, execution and oversight of UMB’s investment strategy. He is chairman of the Trust Investment, Asset Allocation and Trust Policy Committees. Mr. Mathews has more than 20 years of diverse experience in the investment industry. Prior to joining UMB, he served as vice president and manager of the portfolio management group at Bank of Oklahoma for nine years. Mr. Mathews earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Notre Dame. Mr. Mathews attended the ABA National Trust School at Northwestern University and is a Chartered Financial Analyst and member of the CFA Institute. He is past president of the Kansas City CFA Society and a past president of the Oklahoma Society of Financial Analysts.



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Financial Words of the Week: APY, annual interest rate and compound interest

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FWOTW

Ever notice that sometimes your interest rate has the letters APY next to it and sometimes you just see a percentage? What do those letters mean? More importantly, how does the difference affect the money you earn in savings and pay on a loan?

First of all, you need to know that compound interest comes from the money you earn on the interestyou’ve already earned. This is one of the many reasons you want to get the highest interest rates for your savings/investing and the lowest interest rate for your loans. It differs from simple interest which only earns interest on the principal balance.

Financial institutions should give you two quotes when you are asking about interest rates: the annual interest rate and the Annual Percentage Yield (APY).

The annual interest rate is the yearly rate you earn in an investment or pay on a loan and doesn’t factor in compound interest. The annual interest rate is what the account is currently earning and only involves simple interest.

Example: If your savings account has a balance of $10,000 and an annual interest rate (no compounding) of 1 percent, then here’s how you would calculate your earnings from one year:

                                $10,000 x 1% = $100 (after one year, your account balance would be $10,100)

Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is the similar to annual interest rate, but it does factor in compounding.  This can make a significant difference when it comes to investing and borrowing.  APY is what you’ll use when comparing rates for investment/saving options.

Example: If you put the same amount of money into a savings account that utilizes APY (compounding interest of 1 percent), here’s the formula you’d use assuming the interest is compounded twice a year:

                                           $10,000 x (1 + .01/2)2 = $10,100.25 (balance after one year)

While the above examples show insignificant differences – did we really take the time to explain all this for a 25 cent difference? – the larger your interest rates and deposit  balances are, the more impact APY vs. annual interest rate will make. Remember, compound interest is your friend when you’re saving or investing and your foe when you’re taking out a loan or using a credit card.

 

 

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Cyber security: 10 tips for protecting yourself online

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Did you know that one in eight Internet users (or 378 million adults) became victims of cybercrime last year according to a Norton Cybercrime Report? Instead of avoiding the Internet – a nearly impossible task – make an effort to smarten up your online habits with our new Online Security Resource Center coming in November and these 10 ways to keep you safe on the Internet:

protect yourself online

  1. Keep your computers and mobile devices updated – Having the latest security software, web browser and operating system are the best defenses against viruses, malware and other online threats. Turn on automatic updates so you receive the newest fixes as they become available.
  2. Set strong passwords with at least eight characters in length and a mix of upper and lowercase letters, numbers and special characters.
  3. Use different passwords for every account – It may be easier to remember one password, but if the password and email address you use for one account gets in the hands of the wrong person, they will start trying it on other sites and services.
  4. Think before you click – Be vigilant about the links you click in an email, especially when they come from companies. Don’t click on odd Facebook messages with links. If your friend is sending the email, make sure it sounds like the person you know; otherwise his or her account could have been compromised.
  5. Watch out for phishing scams that use fraudulent emails and websites to trick users into disclosing private account or login information. Do not click on links or open any attachments or pop-up screens from sources you are not familiar with. Report phishing emails to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).
  6. Keep personal information personal – Hackers can use social media profiles to figure out your passwords and answer those security questions in the password reset tools. Lock down your privacy settings and avoid posting things like birthdays, addresses, mother’s maiden name, etc. Be wary of requests to connect from people you do not know.
  7. Secure your Internet connection – Always protect your home wireless network with a password. When connecting to public Wi-Fi networks, be cautious about what information you are sending over it.
  8. Shop securely online – Avoid sending payment information or credit card numbers through email. Make sure all personal information transactions are done on a secure site. When shopping online, only use trusted, secure websites. And before providing any personal or financial information, make sure the address bar changes from an “http” to an “https” address and includes a yellow padlock logo to the right of the Web browser address bar. The “s” stands for “secure,” and if you double-click on the yellow padlock logo, you’ll see a digital certificate for the website. When shopping online, use credit cards, not debit cards. This will minimize the damage in the event of a compromised account.
  9. Read the site’s privacy policies – Though long and complex, privacy policies tell you how the site protects the personal information it collects. If you don’t see or understand a site’s privacy policy, consider doing business elsewhere.
  10. Pay attention – It might seem obvious, but remember to keep your eyes open any time you’re using an Internet service.

Be sure to read the rest of our advice on protecting your mobile device and the ways cyber criminals try to steal your information.

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Source: American Bankers Association

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and has 16 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Midterm elections: What does it matter to the economy?

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Elections are vital for more than just ensuring the democratic process (and inundating you with political campaign ads). They also decide which politicians will be making serious fiscal decisions for us. With the midterm elections being held next week, we want to discuss just how they affect the economy.

See below for more…

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Control change in Congress
The race worth watching in the midterm elections this year will be in the Senate. At this early stage we believe there is a slightly better than 50 percent chance that the Republican Party will win control of the Senate. As for the House, the Republican majority does not appear to be changing hands.

Currently, Democrats control the Senate with 53 seats and two Independents that both caucus with the Democrats. Republicans hold the remaining 45 seats.

Here’s the math that leads us to our conclusion that the Republicans have the edge this time:

  • 36 contested seats
    • 21 will go to the Democrats
      • These include seven Democrats in states that supported Mitt Romney in the presidential election. These seven states have substantially lower approval ratings of President Obama than the national average.
    • 15 will go to the Republicans
      • Only one of the Republicans up for reelection is in a state that President Obama carried.

Our research tells us that incumbency is a powerful thing.  During an average election cycle, 90 percent of incumbents win reelection. The Republicans need six additional seats to have the majority, which means it’s going to be close. This is why we put the odds at only slightly better than a coin toss.

What we find interesting is looking past the 2014 Senate race and into the 2016 cycle where we see the opposite happening. Out of the 24 Republicans up for reelection, seven are in states that supported President Obama, meaning the Senate may see a yo-yo effect in 2016.

Why it matters
Why does it matter if the Republicans control Congress? If they are in control, we believe Congress will focus its attention on a few major issues:

  • Spending and other fiscal issues – The debt ceiling will once again be a discussion point in March 2015. A Republican-controlled Congress may look for spending concessions.
  • The 2016 budget –The Republicans made a big deal out of the Senate’s failure to pass a budget in the past, so now it’s their turn to get it done. If Paul Ryan is Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, we could see discussions around tax reform and changes to Medicare and Medicaid.
  • Immigration reform – This could be put on the back burner, which forces it to be addressed by our 2016 presidential candidates.

Stay tuned for part II of this topic on election day—November 4!

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


K.C. Mathews joined UMB in 2002. As executive vice president and chief investment officer, Mr. Mathews is responsible for the development, execution and oversight of UMB’s investment strategy. He is chairman of the Trust Investment, Asset Allocation and Trust Policy Committees. Mr. Mathews has more than 20 years of diverse experience in the investment industry. Prior to joining UMB, he served as vice president and manager of the portfolio management group at Bank of Oklahoma for nine years. Mr. Mathews earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Notre Dame. Mr. Mathews attended the ABA National Trust School at Northwestern University and is a Chartered Financial Analyst and member of the CFA Institute. He is past president of the Kansas City CFA Society and a past president of the Oklahoma Society of Financial Analysts.



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Financial Word of the Week (Small Business Month): Collateral

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FWOTW

Collateral is a company’s assets that are pledged to ensure payment of a financial obligation. Collateral can include business or personal assets such as equity in your home. Business collateral typically includes equipment, inventory, vehicles and accounts receivable. As we explained in our post about the “Five Cs of Credit” (one of which is collateral), you may be required to sign a guarantee with the promise to repay the loan if you cannot repay it with the profits from your business.

Sometimes a Small Business Administration (SBA) loan could be used if there is a collateral short fall within the organization.  An SBA loan has other requirements as well.

A company must understand that the collateral they put up for a loan could be seized if a company defaults on a loan. Also remember that most lending institutions require your collateral value to be more than the loan amount.

 

 

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Cyber security: 10 tips for protecting your mobile device

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Your mobile device provides convenient access to your email, bank and social media accounts. Unfortunately, it can potentially provide the same convenient access to criminals. As we continue National Cyber Security Awareness Month, remember to always follow these tips from the American Bankers Association in conjunction with the Stop.Think.Connect. campaign to keep your information – and your money – safe.

protect your mobile

  1. Use the passcode lock on your smartphone and other devices – This makes it more difficult for thieves to access your information if your device is lost or stolen.
  2. Protect your phone from viruses and malicious software just like you do for your computer by installing mobile security software.
  3. Use caution when downloading apps – Apps can contain malicious software, worms, and viruses. Beware of apps that ask for unnecessary “permissions.”
  4. Download the updates for your phone and mobile apps. These contain valuable security patches and fixes for vulnerabilities.
  5. Avoid storing sensitive information like passwords or a social security number on your mobile device.
  6. Be aware of shoulder surfers – The most basic form of information theft is observation. Be aware of your surroundings especially when you’re punching in sensitive information.
  7. Wipe your mobile device before you donate, sell or trade it using specialized software or using the manufacturer’s recommended technique. Some software allows you to wipe your device remotely if it is lost or stolen.
  8. Beware of mobile phishing – Avoid opening links and attachments in emails and texts, especially from senders you don’t know. Be wary of ads (not from your security provider) claiming that your device is infected.
  9. Watch out for public Wi-Fi – Public connections aren’t very secure, so don’t perform banking transactions on a public network. If you need to access your account, try disabling the Wi-Fi and switching to your mobile network.
  10. Report any suspected fraud to your bank immediately.

Next week we’ll share 10 tips to protect yourself online to wrap up National Cyber Security Awareness Month.

 

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Source: American Bankers Association

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and has 16 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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