Blog   Tagged ‘assets’

Do you need a wealth advisor?

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Do you need a wealth advisor (also known as financial planner)? You might think that only the very wealthy need this type of expert advice. If you’re interested in investing, whether it’s for retirement, education or to leave a legacy, it is recommended that you work with a financial planning professional.

Whether it’s your first time talking to a financial planning professional or your 10th, you want to ensure your advisor is taking the time to ask the sometimes difficult questions to plan the best future for you.

Basic financial planning questions

Most customers focus on questions like:

  • Will I have enough to retire?
  • Will my children’s education be taken care of?
  • What if I get sick?

These are important topics to cover, but an in-depth financial/estate planning will include more than these basic questions.

Do I need a trust?

One question you should ask is, “Do I need a trust?” A trust is a legal agreement that allows you to transfer assets to a trustee. A trust can be used for various reasons including to:

  • manage assets
  • protect assets
  • facilitate charitable gifts
  • transfer of monetary assets or property

If the answer is yes, your advisor should assist you with making sure your assets are titled appropriately, or given the correct ownership recognition. You wouldn’t want to spend several thousand dollars for an attorney to prepare a trust document, only to find out that the assets aren’t titled appropriately. If so, the trust doesn’t get funded and your estate plan isn’t carried out to your intentions.

What about insurance?

Your advisor should also discuss the topic of insurance with you. Customers and advisors sometimes avoid this question, as it can be an uncomfortable conversation. Most insurance is used in the case of a disaster, accident, illness or death, and these are not pleasant subjects to discuss. You want an advisor who will understand the sensitivities of these topics, but will not avoid the subject. Insurance is an important part of a financial plan and it can be helpful to your family’s future.

Building relationships

You should look for an advisor who will build a relationship with you. If they work to create more than a business partnership, it’s likely there will be more open dialogue between you both. Advisors who are thorough in their work and ask the hard questions will be able to build a solid financial/estate plan for you, your family and their future generations.

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.

Bank deposit products provided by UMB Bank n.a., Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender EqualHousingLender


David Brody serves as executive vice president and marketing manager, UMB Private Wealth Management. He joined UMB in 2010. Brody received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Georgia. He also has various sales and management training through Cannon and the American Bankers Association.



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The Credit Conversation: Now is the time to talk with your private banker

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Personal lending was a completely different world just a few short years ago. With shifts in the financial landscape, economic uncertainty and low interest rates, this is a good time for you to talk with a private banker and create a financial plan for the future—and the conversation should start with the topic of credit.

What was best for a person five years ago may not be the right choice now. Markets shift, and it’s important to occasionally survey the financial landscape with your private banker and possibly prepare for new opportunities.

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  • Work with advisors, not transaction managers.
    Sound financial planning is built on strong relationships, not individual transactions. Those relationships are built on knowledge and trust. A private banker should be acting as your advisor so they can help you make decisions that fit both your short- and long-term goals. Advisors will focus on tomorrow’s financial decisions, not today’s transaction.
  • Don’t make credit decisions with blinders on.
    No financial decision should be made without knowing the overall financial picture. In a trustworthy banking relationship, your private banker works alongside an entire team of experts to determine the best lending solutions for areas such as investment, tax and retirement purposes while also taking into consideration the overall wealth and estate plan.
  • Create a customized credit plan.
    It’s important to understand all the options. The truth: most people don’t proactively manage the borrowing side of their personal balance sheets when they plan to purchase a luxury vehicle, a business or a second home. That may stem from not knowing all of the varied credit options available.

    A private banker can help you explore and customize lending solutions to match risk and best leverage your assets. This provides you with options that may extend beyond the ones commonly offered in the marketplace.
  • Prepare for the unexpected with a line of credit.
    As the old saying goes, the time to borrow money is when you don’t need it. For example, a line of credit can be an invaluable tool to help you prepare for the unexpected and manage your overall financial picture. 

    Lines of credit can be used for a wide variety of purposes, including major ticket purchases, home improvements, education and medical bills. Additionally, lines of credit can provide you with peace of mind if and when unexpected expenses occur.

As you plan for your future, it’s important to talk with a professional who can ensure you are taking full advantage of the many credit solutions available to you while also providing you with advice related to your overall wealth plan.

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Stokes is a senior vice president and director of Private Banking at UMB. She is responsible for driving sales and relationship management activities. She works closely with the Wealth Management leadership team and regional presidents to grow business and helps to develop roles in wealth management, relationship management and presentation skills. She joined UMB in 2009 and has more than 30 years of experience in the financial services industry. She earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Missouri- Kansas City and a Bachelor of Arts from the graduate school of retail banking.



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Fiduciaries: what are they and why do you need them?

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One of the most important items in your estate planning process is naming the fiduciaries who will execute your wishes and manage your assets when needed. First, you may be wondering what exactly is a fiduciary. Very simply, a fiduciary is a third-party representative who is appointed to act on behalf of someone else.

Two of the most common fiduciaries in estate planning are the personal representative, the person who handles the assets that are included in someone’s last will and testament; and a trustee, someone who handles the assets that have been placed in a trust.

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So, why do you need a fiduciary and how do you choose the right one? Here are some things to keep in mind.

  • Carefully select a fiduciary that you trust to execute your plans.

    Handling an estate may seem like a simple process that anyone can easily manage. However, don’t underestimate both the amount of work and the expertise needed to carry out required duties.

    First, there are a variety of laws that must be navigated, including complicated probate laws. Additionally, accounting for estates and trusts can be extremely technical and require excellent record keeping and tracking. Your fiduciaries must be able to show through proper accounting that they have handled and managed the estate and its assets in an accurate, fair and unbiased manner. If you pick someone who is lacking in knowledge or organizational skills they are at risk for liability and personal fines.

    Tax planning is also a necessary expertise—it’s imperative that an estate is run in a tax-efficient manner. Fiduciaries must understand how their actions affect the estate or trust as well as the beneficiaries. This includes how assets are invested and distributed since trusts are subject to different tax rates and laws than individuals or corporations.

  • There may be disagreements.

    Secondly, you may truly believe that your family members and friends will easily work together and agree on how your assets should be handled. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case. Appointing a family member or friend frequently causes tension or distress that may not have existed before. If not handled properly, this can easily result in stress, damaged relations or, in some cases, legal action between or against your loved ones.

  • You don’t have to be wealthy to use a professional fiduciary.

    Employing a professional fiduciary is cost-effective, and something you should think about even if you do not consider yourself to be a high-net-worth individual. Your immediate reaction may be that it’s more expensive to hire a fiduciary to handle everything, rather than seeking individual counsel from different experts as needed. However, in many cases, a fiduciary’s cost will be equal to or less expensive.

At the end of the day, it’s in your best interest to carefully research your options to select the appropriate fiduciary for your own unique situation. Designating the right person to efficiently and quickly handle these details in a difficult time is truly one of the best gifts you can leave behind.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Tjaden serves as executive vice president and chief fiduciary officer. He is responsible for supervising all fiduciary activities and staff for UMB, including offices in Kansas City, St. Louis, Denver, Phoenix and Salina, as well as the Trust Company in South Dakota. Mr. Tjaden oversees Personal Trust, Custody, Foundations, Trust Legal and Business Support Services within the Private Wealth Management division. He joined UMB in 1977. Mr. Tjaden earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration and political science from Kansas State University. He also earned a Juris Doctor and a master’s in business administration from the University of Kansas. Additionally, Mr. Tjaden is a Certified Trust and Financial Advisor and a member of the Estate Planning Society, the Johnson County Bar Association and the Kansas Bar Association.



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A note from our CFO

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This year, UMB has celebrated many achievements in reaching our 100-year milestone. One thing we are particularly proud of is our ongoing effort to be transparent in our communication.

You may have read the news articles about two specific things: depositor exiting UMB and our capital raise project. First and foremost, I want to clearly state that these two topics are completely unrelated. Anyone who has ever been through a common stock offering knows it’s not something you can pull off in a couple of days. The timing of the two events was unfortunate, because it created incorrect assumptions. We did not execute a capital raise because of the depositor.

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To comply with securities rules related to our stock offering, we were limited in what we could say about the depositor. However, now that we are on the other side, I would like to take the opportunity to provide more context.

  • Depositor
    A few notes on the depositor. The organization is still a UMB customer. We previously disclosed that the deposits would move over the next 120 days, and as of today, the deposits remain on our balance sheet. Additionally, the customer will continue to work with UMB on their asset servicing business even after the deposits have exited.The decision to move the deposits off of our balance sheet was a result of ongoing dialogue we have had with the customer for the past couple of years. UMB has had a longstanding risk management strategy, and during a review of potential deposit concentrations, we approached the customer to reduce their deposits. They did so, but because of continued growth in the customer’s business, the deposits began increasing again. UMB will continue to monitor our deposit concentrations and will continue to make decisions that are best for our company and our shareholders. We have multiple unique sources of deposits: Institutional Banking and Investment Services (IBIS), Fund Services and Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) just to name a few, so it is important that we are continuously monitoring and adjusting as appropriate.
  • Capital Raise
    Our company has been growing steadily over the past few years and that is evident in our financial results. We have experienced robust balance sheet growth, especially in loans. After we completed our recent forecasts, it was clear that the expectations for growth would continue. We needed to grow our capital to support our balance sheet growth. We plan to use the money raised to support our continued growth and for general corporate purposes.When I tell my kids what I’ve been up to the last couple of months, I essentially tell them that I went to New York and asked strangers and current shareholders to invest in our company. And based on our consistent and stable growth for more than 100 years, they gave us more than $200 million.A simple analogy—but it essentially describes our capital raise campaign. Also important to note, the majority of the investors are new to UMB which validates our current investors, and is a testament to the work our associates have been doing over the last century.

I hope this gives you some color to our recent news. It’s a fantastic time for UMB and I look forward to what the next 100 years will bring!

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Hagedorn is president and chief executive officer of UMB Bank and vice chairman of UMB Financial Corporation. Prior to this role, Hagedorn served as chief financial officer and chief administrative officer of UMB Financial Corporation. He joined UMB in March 2005.



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A smooth road to retirement

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Are you ready to begin the next stage of your life? Retirement is still an option despite the current slow-growth economy. If you’re considering or approaching retirement, there are several items to keep in mind when nearing this important milestone. If you are planning to leave the working world in the next 18 to 24 months, here are a few considerations in the current economy:

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  • Understand your actual timeline.

    Your “time horizon” may be longer than you realize. Life expectancy is also a big factor. A retirement date is an initial benchmark, but you need to keep in mind that your money can still “work for you” while you are enjoying your newly discovered free time.

  • Make sure to have a cash reserve.

    You should build up a reserve large enough to carry you through six to 12 months of retirement expenses. This can provide a cushion in case of an unexpected downturn or a major unplanned expense.

As markets can vary year to year, those with more than two years until retirement can plan for either situation in the following ways:

  • Increase contributions.

    Invest extra cash. Consistent dollar-cost averaging can help reduce the worry of when and how much to invest. You may also want to direct some of those extra contributions into a cash reserve, just in case of unexpected declines.

  • Diversify, diversify, diversify.

    Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Throughout market cycles, different classes, styles and assets with diverse market capitalizations perform differently. Actively managing your portfolio diversification can have a greater impact on performance than individual investments.

Most of all, flexibility and patience are virtues in the world of portfolio management.  Don’t fall in love with a retirement date, and don’t be frustrated with market activity. If you have questions or concerns, it may be advantageous to seek the advice of an experienced professional.

Professional advisors can offer objective, educated and customized guidance. They are also an objective and knowledgeable resource that can provide a valuable perspective. While an advisor may not be able to provide every person with the news they want to hear, a good financial advisor can help maximize and leverage the assets individuals have against their personal timelines, risk tolerance and goals.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Diederich serves as managing director of portfolio management. He is responsible for managing the portfolios of high net worth clients and select institutional relationships. He joined UMB in 2003. Mr. Diederich earned a Bachelor of Science in Finance from Missouri State University in Springfield, Mo., and a Master of Business Administration from the University of Missouri – Kansas City. He is a Certified Financial Planner®, a member of the Financial Planning Association and has more than 15 years of experience in the financial services industry.



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The Five Cs of Credit

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Are you an entrepreneur looking to start up a new boutique or local restaurant? Or are you an owner of an established firm seeking to expand or upgrade? Either way, securing financing for your business is sometimes an overwhelming process.

UMB has a long history of being prudent in our lending. We don’t want to put our customers, or ourselves, at risk, so we follow a sound underwriting process to ensure we are making the best decision for everyone involved.

Here are some common guidelines we use when it comes to the loan process.

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Character

This is the overall impression you make on the banker. Business experience and educational background will be evaluated, along with references and past experience.

Word of Advice: You need a business plan. Be open and honest – you should provide the most accurate and objective information about the business and industry landscape.

Capacity

You will need to detail exactly how you plan to repay the loan. Business cash flow, repayment timing and likelihood of repayment will be considered, as will payment history on your current credit. Financial partners need to have confidence that your business will generate enough cash to operate and sustain the company.

Word of Advice: Prepare to have money set aside for a down payment.  Don’t come to the table empty-handed.

Capital

This is the money you have individually invested in the business and is used to assess your risk should the venture not succeed. It’s important for you to demonstrate a personal financial commitment before seeking third-party funding.

Word of Advice: Financial institutions generally require that at least one-third to one-half of the business be funded with your money.

Collateral

This is where assets you own are pledged to the lender as a secondary source of repayment in case the loan is not repaid. You also may be required to sign a guarantee with the promise to repay the loan if you cannot repay it with the profits from the business.

Word of Advice: Most banks will expect the collateral assessment to be greater than the loan amount.

Conditions

This is the outlined plan for the loan, with details on how it will be used and for what purposes. Current economic and business conditions for all industries, as well as your business’ specific industry, will also be evaluated.

Word of Advice: Have a strong knowledge of industry trends, both nationally and in the local market. Timing can be critical.

You should pick a financial lender that will be your partner, not just your bank. After that, securing a loan to start or grow a business should be a smooth process and you’ll be well on your way to fulfilling your dream!




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