Blog   Tagged ‘capital’

A note from our CFO

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This year, UMB has celebrated many achievements in reaching our 100-year milestone. One thing we are particularly proud of is our ongoing effort to be transparent in our communication.

You may have read the news articles about two specific things: depositor exiting UMB and our capital raise project. First and foremost, I want to clearly state that these two topics are completely unrelated. Anyone who has ever been through a common stock offering knows it’s not something you can pull off in a couple of days. The timing of the two events was unfortunate, because it created incorrect assumptions. We did not execute a capital raise because of the depositor.

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To comply with securities rules related to our stock offering, we were limited in what we could say about the depositor. However, now that we are on the other side, I would like to take the opportunity to provide more context.

  • Depositor
    A few notes on the depositor. The organization is still a UMB customer. We previously disclosed that the deposits would move over the next 120 days, and as of today, the deposits remain on our balance sheet. Additionally, the customer will continue to work with UMB on their asset servicing business even after the deposits have exited.The decision to move the deposits off of our balance sheet was a result of ongoing dialogue we have had with the customer for the past couple of years. UMB has had a longstanding risk management strategy, and during a review of potential deposit concentrations, we approached the customer to reduce their deposits. They did so, but because of continued growth in the customer’s business, the deposits began increasing again. UMB will continue to monitor our deposit concentrations and will continue to make decisions that are best for our company and our shareholders. We have multiple unique sources of deposits: Institutional Banking and Investment Services (IBIS), Fund Services and Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) just to name a few, so it is important that we are continuously monitoring and adjusting as appropriate.
  • Capital Raise
    Our company has been growing steadily over the past few years and that is evident in our financial results. We have experienced robust balance sheet growth, especially in loans. After we completed our recent forecasts, it was clear that the expectations for growth would continue. We needed to grow our capital to support our balance sheet growth. We plan to use the money raised to support our continued growth and for general corporate purposes.When I tell my kids what I’ve been up to the last couple of months, I essentially tell them that I went to New York and asked strangers and current shareholders to invest in our company. And based on our consistent and stable growth for more than 100 years, they gave us more than $200 million.A simple analogy—but it essentially describes our capital raise campaign. Also important to note, the majority of the investors are new to UMB which validates our current investors, and is a testament to the work our associates have been doing over the last century.

I hope this gives you some color to our recent news. It’s a fantastic time for UMB and I look forward to what the next 100 years will bring!

 

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Mr. Hagedorn is president and chief executive officer of UMB Bank and vice chairman of UMB Financial Corporation. Prior to this role, Hagedorn served as chief financial officer and chief administrative officer of UMB Financial Corporation. He joined UMB in March 2005.

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The Five Cs of Credit

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Are you an entrepreneur looking to start up a new boutique or local restaurant? Or are you an owner of an established firm seeking to expand or upgrade? Either way, securing financing for your business is sometimes an overwhelming process.

UMB has a long history of being prudent in our lending. We don’t want to put our customers, or ourselves, at risk, so we follow a sound underwriting process to ensure we are making the best decision for everyone involved.

Here are some common guidelines we use when it comes to the loan process.

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Character

This is the overall impression you make on the banker. Business experience and educational background will be evaluated, along with references and past experience.

Word of Advice: You need a business plan. Be open and honest – you should provide the most accurate and objective information about the business and industry landscape.

Capacity

You will need to detail exactly how you plan to repay the loan. Business cash flow, repayment timing and likelihood of repayment will be considered, as will payment history on your current credit. Financial partners need to have confidence that your business will generate enough cash to operate and sustain the company.

Word of Advice: Prepare to have money set aside for a down payment.  Don’t come to the table empty-handed.

Capital

This is the money you have individually invested in the business and is used to assess your risk should the venture not succeed. It’s important for you to demonstrate a personal financial commitment before seeking third-party funding.

Word of Advice: Financial institutions generally require that at least one-third to one-half of the business be funded with your money.

Collateral

This is where assets you own are pledged to the lender as a secondary source of repayment in case the loan is not repaid. You also may be required to sign a guarantee with the promise to repay the loan if you cannot repay it with the profits from the business.

Word of Advice: Most banks will expect the collateral assessment to be greater than the loan amount.

Conditions

This is the outlined plan for the loan, with details on how it will be used and for what purposes. Current economic and business conditions for all industries, as well as your business’ specific industry, will also be evaluated.

Word of Advice: Have a strong knowledge of industry trends, both nationally and in the local market. Timing can be critical.

You should pick a financial lender that will be your partner, not just your bank. After that, securing a loan to start or grow a business should be a smooth process and you’ll be well on your way to fulfilling your dream!


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