Blog   Tagged ‘credit score’

Financial Word of the Week: Debt-to-Income

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FWOTW

Last week we explained what Loan-to-Value meant, specifically with mortgages. Now it’s time to tackle another important ratio: Debt-to-Income (DTI).

Your DTI ratio tells lenders how much of your income goes towards your debt and is another number you want to be low. Lenders will look carefully at your DTI ratio, along with your credit score, LTV, and other factors when considering you for a loan. You should aim for a DTI ratio of approximately one third (or lower).

How to calculate

Add up all of the debt payments you make each month (mortgage, student loans, vehicle loan, outstanding credit card balance, etc.). Then divide it by your gross monthly income (pre-tax). So if you make $50,000/year or $4167/month and have $1,500 in debt to pay each month, your DTI would be $1,500 ÷ $4,167 = 36%.

If you’re thinking of buying your first home, calculate how much house you can afford with this calculator, but also factor in how much debt you already have.

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UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.

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Financial Words of the Week: Delinquency and Derogatory

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FWOTW

Have you ever missed a credit card bill or a loan payment? You may know that missing a bill can hurt your credit, but do you know how much? What should you do about it?

What does a late payment mean for my credit?

Missing a loan or credit card payment is known as a delinquency. Delinquencies may  negatively affect your credit history and credit score. If you miss a payment, the best thing you can do is to make that payment as soon as possible. The longer you wait, the more interest will build up.

In terms of your credit score, you need to make the original payment before the next payment is due as well as that next payment. Generally, delinquencies are measured in months, rounding up to the nearest month. The day after the missed due date, an account could be counted as one month late, depending on the lender. One month and one day after the missed due date, that account may be considered two months late and is now a major derogatory.

What is a derogatory, and what makes it major or minor?

Any negative information on your credit history is a derogatory. When a lender reviews your credit, they look at what derogatories show up and how recent they are. Derogatories (or your lack of derogatory information) also make up an important chunk of your credit score. A debt two months late or more counts as a major derogatory. Major derogatories hurt your credit score more because of their serious nature. Other examples include bankruptcies, foreclosures and many debts that go to collections. If you have already missed one month, the best thing you can do is not let it become two.

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UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.

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Debunking credit score myths

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In an earlier blog post, we explained why credit scores are important and how to improve yours. For many people, it can seem as if their score was pulled blindly from a hat. So let’s take a look and debunk a few myths.

Credit Score Myths

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Ms. Stokes is a senior vice president and director of Private Banking at UMB. She is responsible for driving sales and relationship management activities. She works closely with the Wealth Management leadership team and regional presidents to grow business and helps to develop roles in wealth management, relationship management and presentation skills. She joined UMB in 2009 and has more than 30 years of experience in the financial services industry. She earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Missouri- Kansas City and a Bachelor of Arts from the graduate school of retail banking.

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Credit Score: understanding the number

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Cholesterol, blood pressure, glucose, credit score…all numbers that mean nothing unless someone explains what is good and what is scary. Just like a doctor breaks down why your cholesterol level should be below 200, we’re here to explain what an ideal credit score could be. And you don’t even have to cut cheese out of your diet.

Your credit score (the most popular being the FICO® Score named after the organization that created it — the Fair Isaac Corporation) can range from 300 to 850 because it’s an adjusted scale. (You get 300 points just for having a credit history…so most adults have a higher score than 300 just by being “on the grid.”) In case you’re afraid to get the pronunciation wrong, FICO is pronounced “f-eye-ko,” like “psycho.”

Why does it matter? If you’re ever going to purchase a house or car or apply for a job, lenders and potential employers will be checking your score to assess your reliability and financial history.

While there are some schools of thought that advise consumers not to obsess over credit scores, the most popular being financial author and radio host Dave Ramsey, the FICO Score is a factor in 90 percent of lending decisions in the United States. And many in those anti-credit score camps still encourage you to be aware of your credit reports to check for errors and work on problem areas.

Most important step: check your score and your reports! Even if you’re worried because of past mistakes with late payments or credit card debt, it’s better to know where you stand and start taking action. No ostrich-like behavior!

head in sand_156983825

Good news—unless you’re within the 7 percent of the nation with a score between 350 and 549 (and if you are, stop reading this post and call a credit counselor), there is no need to stress. At a score of 550 or more, you can sometimes qualify for a loan. Your motivation for raising it as high as possible will be to get the best interest rates.

Most creditors consider a score above 700 to be acceptable to give a consumer the best rates. If your score is below 700, here are some tips that can help you bring it up. You may be surprised how quickly you can make a change (1-3 years instead of the 7-10 years it takes to start fresh after declaring bankruptcy).

How to raise your score:

1)    Understand how the score is decided

Credit Score Formula

In order of greatest to least weight:

  • Payment history – Did you pay all your bills on time? This includes student loans, car payments, credit card bill, etc.
  • Amount owed – for example, you still owe $10,000 before you can pay off your car, $15,000 in student loans and $500 on one of your credit cards.
  • Credit history length – something positive about getting older! The longer you have a credit history, the higher your score rises.
  • New credit – did you recently open a slew of store credit cards in order to get a discount on a shopping spree? You may be paying for it in the form of a lower credit score.
  • Type of credit used – Credit bureaus look at mortgages vs. auto loans vs. student loans vs. credit cards. Some are better for your score than others.

2)    Stay on top of your bills
The best way to improve on your credit score is to pay your bills on time. Have a steady income and live within your means so your bills don’t pile up until you’re completely buried in credit card and loan debt.

3)    Ask about your custom credit score
Lenders might also look at your custom credit score in addition to your traditional credit score. A lender will use your custom credit score to get a closer look at the risk factors that are related to what you are trying to fund with the line of credit.

4)    Discuss internal credit scoring
Not every creditor is required to report your credit. Some major lenders use their own internal credit scoring systems to help them make a decision. Lenders use these internal scores to predict future behavior of their customers. When you answer questions on the loan application form, the responses will go in to creating a custom score for you.

5)    One size doesn’t fit all
What makes you appealing to one lender will not make you appealing to all. If your credit has been damaged, be sure that any new information is reported to credit agencies.

6)    Pay the minimum
If you can’t pay the entire balance of a credit payment, at least pay the minimum due. Paying the minimum will keep your credit score from dropping even lower than it would if you don’t pay the bill at all.

7)    Keep checking
You have rights as a consumer under the Fair Credit Reporting Act. Check your report (not score) once a year for free at AnnualCreditReport.com‡.

This video from the Federal Trade Commission’s website does a great job at explaining why you need to check your report and how to do it.

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Stokes is a senior vice president and director of Private Banking at UMB. She is responsible for driving sales and relationship management activities. She works closely with the Wealth Management leadership team and regional presidents to grow business and helps to develop roles in wealth management, relationship management and presentation skills. She joined UMB in 2009 and has more than 30 years of experience in the financial services industry. She earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Missouri- Kansas City and a Bachelor of Arts from the graduate school of retail banking.

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Simplifying your credit

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When was the last time you downloaded your credit score? If you can’t remember or you have never checked it, you should consider taking a look at it soon. But you’re not alone. Two thirds of the population have not downloaded their credit report in the past year, despite the fact that the average American owes $118,000 in debt. This includes mortgage, student loans, credit card debt, etc.

Pie Chart Downloaded Credit Report in Last 12 Months

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Why do you need to know your credit score? High debt combined with little to no information about your credit score could put you in a risky financial situation. If you have so much debt that you can’t keep up with it and your regular monthly bills, you might end up paying a bill late or forget to pay it at all. This will lead to a lower credit score. Then when you go to apply for a home or car loan, you could be either denied or receive a higher than normal interest rate based on your lowered score.

Unfortunately, this has become a very common scenario. Many people are living month-to-month and often carry over their credit card debt each month just like their regular bills. One third of working adults don’t pay bills on time in part due to the number of accounts they have. Many have trouble keeping up with monthly expenses, requiring them to dip into savings to cover regular expenses.

Pie Chart Pay Bills on Time

Did you know that there are ways to reduce your loan interest rates and monthly payments? You can also reduce the number of payments you owe and even earn money with rewards points from certain credit cards.

To simplify your credit, consider the following options:

  • Use the bill pay option with your bank

    This saves time and you can go to one place to manage all of your bills and schedule them to pay once per month.

  • Consolidate your debt

    Consolidating your debt allows you to have one payment for all your debt and you can usually obtain a lower interest rate. This can allow you to pay your debt in less time for less money.

  • Reduce the number of credit cards you use

    This is another way to help you keep track of your spending and bills. Consider using a credit card that allows you to earn rewards. When you use the card you can earn points toward purchases, helping you save money.

  • Take advantage of low interest rates

    If you refinance your current mortgage to the low rates available now, you can save on your monthly payment. This is also true of auto loan rates.

If you feel overwhelmed by debt and monthly bills, take advantage of these ways to simplify your credit to help you work on becoming debt-free. Even if you don’t have much personal debt, it’s still a good idea to consider these tips to organize your finances, save money, and monitor your credit.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Burditt serves as senior vice president of customer experience in UMB’s Consumer Division. He is responsible for developmental and strategic direction of the UMB consumer customer experience. He joined UMB in 2011. Mr. Burditt earned a Bachelor of Science degree in agricultural journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia. He also is a graduate of the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce’s Centurions program.

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