Blog   Tagged ‘housing’

UMB Insights: How Will Senior Housing Look in 2037?

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Millennials may be all the rage these days, but Baby Boomers are still making an enormous impact on the U.S. economy, particularly in the senior housing market. By 2050, the population of individuals aged 65 or older will grow from 40 to 89 million, an increase of 120 percent.

And as Americans age, where and how they will live becomes a more pressing issue – an issue that will have a significant impact on the economy, construction industry and banking sector over the next 20 years.

Where will Boomers live?

Although staying in their homes is almost universally preferred among Baby Boomers, many aging Americans will transition to multi-housing developments that provide some assistance and allow them to live as independently as possible. Others, especially those with medical disabilities, will seek housing in environments that provide more intensive nursing support and other assistance.

The average age of a resident in a senior housing facility is in the ’80s. With the leading edge of Baby Boomers just now turning 70, the need for additional senior housing units is expected to accelerate over the next few decades. In fact, between 2015 and 2020, all 50 states forecast growth in the number of 75-year-old+ households. The increase in senior housing will come from sectors such as Alzheimer’s and Memory Care facilities, independent living centers, assisted living facilities, skilled nursing facilities, continuing care retirement communities, home health care and hospice care.

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What will their housing look like?

It is a common rule of thumb in the industry that Baby Boomers will typically choose a newer, more modern and home-like facility versus an older institutional facility. Therefore, the industry has moved from an institutional feel to a more home-like atmosphere, including eliminating long hallways and nursing stations and replacing them with single rooms, private baths, large rehab spaces, smaller cafeterias, snack bars, beauty salons, theater rooms and much more. As a result, when new competition hits the market and consumers choose with their feet, it becomes much harder for older facilities to maintain the occupancy levels needed to ensure financial success.

How will their preferences affect the economy?

So, what does this mean for the general economy? It means that there are significant opportunities for contractors, developers and lenders that are experienced in senior housing to help owners modernize existing facilities or build new housing options for seniors. Construction for many new facilities is already underway or in the approval phases and financing continues to be readily available for developers and operators in this sector.

What are the risks?

On the flip side of this successful outlook, there are concerns and challenges that need to be monitored and addressed. Even though the senior housing industry is one of the fastest growing segments in the U.S. economy and there are many desirable lending and development opportunities, builders, developers and lenders must effectively mitigate the risks inherent in the industry.

Characteristics of the long-term care business require that successful participants maintain industry-specific knowledge and utilize best practices for each project. For the benefit of all parties involved, it is important that everyone tied to senior housing projects remain prudent and evaluate all risk related to each project. Doing so will mean a stronger economy with more housing options available for Baby Boomers of all ages.


Richard Ziegner is executive vice president and director of healthcare banking at UMB Bank where he is responsible for leading the bank’s efforts in the healthcare sector and providing capital and financial solutions to healthcare providers. He graduated from the University of Arizona in Tucson, Ariz. with a Bachelor of Science degree in finance and earned his Master of Business Administration degree from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Ariz.



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Economic forecast 2016: the tortoise or the hare?

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We all know of Aesop’s fable The Tortoise and the Hare—a story of two unequal opponents who agree to a race. The outcome appears to be obvious, but in a surprising twist, the ever-so-diligent tortoise perseveres and wins the race. The moral of the story is: slow and steady wins the race.

UMB’s economic theme for 2016 is The Tortoise OR the Hare. We think the U.S. economy, which has grown throughout the past few years at a tortoise-like pace, will continue to produce mediocre growth in 2016. Given the stimuli that abounds, one might think the economy should grow at a faster pace, more “hare-like;” however, we think slow and steady will win out once again. We anticipate the U.S. economy will continue to grow in the 2 percent to 2.2 percent range in 2016. Relative to other economies, tortoise-like growth will be a winner.

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hareThe hare
Historically the U.S. economy has been more hare-like. So what has changed? When did our economy go from consistently growing more than 3 percent annually to a tortoise-like economy with growth less than 2.5 percent? For example, from 1955 to 2005, the U.S. average real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was 3.4 percent. Fast-forward to the period from 2005 to 2015 and real GDP averaged a paltry 1.5 percent, leaving economists wondering what happened.

To answer this question, we investigated two economic variables that drive potential GDP: labor force growth and productivity gains.

two economic variables that drive potential GDP: labor force growth and productivity gainsData Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis

Labor force growth
In economics, potential output refers to the highest level of real GDP (output) that can be sustained over the long term. Year-to-year actual GDP may vary from potential GDP; this is called the output gap. Forecasting potential GDP should be relatively easy, as the formula is simply labor force growth plus productivity gains.
low labor force growth + low productivity gains

2016 forecast GDP

Labor force growth has changed throughout the years and is influenced by several factors. In the 1960s and 1970s labor force growth changed due to population growth, the baby boomer generation reached working age and more women were working outside the home and entering the labor force. However, the significant labor force growth rate increase of the 70s will not be repeated anytime soon. One reason is that most baby boomers have more siblings than children, and labor force growth is partly a function of population growth.

Productivity
The second variable is productivity, or the efficiency of production. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, productivity change in the non-farm business sector from 2007-2014 was only 1.3 percent.

Debate among economists: What drives productivity?

  • Capital accumulation or…
  • accelerating technical progress in high-tech industries plus the resulting investment in information technology

One common theme between both theories is that investment is critical to any growth theory. Therefore monitoring measures of human capital and research and development expenditures is necessary. We believe we will continue to see exciting new technologies developed in the future, but caution that even though new technology is introduced, the lack of adoption to these new technologies can be limiting to productivity. Therefore, we don’t see productivity gains spiking higher in the near future.

tortoiseThe tortoise
So as the fable goes, the tortoise never gives up—it is patient and persistent, and wins the race. This is a great parallel to the U.S. economy in 2016 and perhaps beyond. Our economy has been slow-growing since the Great Recession in 2009 and has continued on that path to real GDP of 1.5 percent in 2013, 2.4 percent in 2014 and near 2.4 percent last year.

I expect our economy to continue to grow at a slow and steady pace in 2016 with real GDP in the range of 2 percent to 2.2 percent. This is in part due to several tailwinds and a few headwinds.

 

GDP economic growth

Tailwinds
The labor market, consumer confidence and low interest rates are a few of the positive variables that support our expectation for steady, ongoing economic expansion.

The robust labor market gives us confidence that the U.S. economy will continue to grow at a steady pace. By the end of 2015, the number of full-time workers rose to a record high of 122.6 million. The Federal Reserve Chairperson, Janet Yellen, suggested in her recent testimony that payroll growth of 100,000 per month can absorb all of the new entrants into the labor market.

Additional data supports a solid labor market. The median duration for the unemployed fell to 10.5 weeks, the lowest in seven years. Finding part-time workers is becoming more difficult, and as the job market improves, we think more people will be encouraged to consider seeking employment. As the labor market tightens, wages will be on the rise as well.

unemployment

Data Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

This dovetails into consumer confidence. When consumers feel good, they will support the economy by spending. Consumer confidence was relatively flat throughout 2015, but remains at a level that supports economic growth. Confidence is primarily driven by the labor market, stock prices and home prices.

The strength in the aforementioned labor market, paired with home prices up 5.5 percent last year, should continue to support confidence. Lower oil prices also gave most consumers a good feeling as their transportation costs were reduced. The wild card here is the stock market. Investors saw mediocre returns last year, (only 1.4 percent return from the S&P 500), along with higher volatility. Weak markets and an increase in volatility may shake consumer confidence this year.

The Fed has kept interest rates low for seven years. We think interest rates will be on the rise throughout 2016, ending the year at 1 percent. However, from a historical perspective, the Fed policy remains extremely expansionary, affording consumers and businesses access to inexpensive capital.

Perhaps China is getting a bad rap; it seems to be blamed for any problem ranging from stock market volatility to global warming. However from our point of view, it’s not all bad. The U.S. imports more goods from China than from any other country. As China devaluates its currency, the yuan, those everyday goods we import become cheaper, which is good for consumers. As their economy slows to a more sustainable level, the demand for energy and commodities wanes and prices are reduced. Again, this is good for the U.S. consumer.

8

Data source: U.S. Census Bureau

Not everything outside of the U.S. is necessarily a negative story, as some would lead consumers to believe. With low interest rates and a quantitative easing program, Europe could experience economic growth in the 1.5 percent to 2.0 percent range. This may not sound like much, but remember in 2014 they grew at a 0.8 percent pace and last year at 1.5 percent.

Headwinds
It’s not all rosy. Some headwinds lead to slower growth and some may not have a significant impact on our economy directly, but rather they may spook risk markets. Stocks are included in this category.

The recent U.S. manufacturing data is suggesting an oncoming economic contraction. For two quarters now, the ISM Purchasing Managers Index has been below 50, indicating a contraction. The good news is that non-manufacturing data is solidly in growth territory, albeit trending south. The bad news–historically the manufacturing data leads the non-manufacturing data. Once again, we think the current data supports a tortoise-like economy in the United States.

The Fed has a tough job: maximize employment, stabilize prices, support global markets, normalize interest rates. Oh, and don’t send us into a recession. Many recessions have been blamed on the Fed for creating a policy error, which is typically viewed as moving too fast or too soon. At this time we don’t see a policy error at hand. The Fed plans to move at a measured pace and it doesn’t look like it will threaten a tortoise-like expansion.

Issues in the global economy will constrain growth in the United States, and as we mentioned, China is slowing. It will have an impact on other emerging markets as well as on the United States to a lesser extent. We don’t believe the Chinese stock market gives us any indication of economic fundamentals due to the speculation in their markets and government intervention. However the massive volatility of their stock markets sends a violent reaction to markets around the globe. If downward pressure continues, it could negatively impact consumer confidence in the United States.

Energy is also an important variable. Even though low energy prices are good for the consumer’s wallet; tension in the Middle East may create an uneasy global economy. And while much of this won’t significantly affect the U.S. economy, it may affect our markets in the short run.

A slow and steady 2016
In 2016 we anticipate GDP growth between 2 percent and 2.2 percent. We think this will be supported by the labor market once again as businesses create new jobs.

Domestic equity returns may once again be challenged, profits are in question and valuations may contract. We expect 3 percent earnings growth which should lead to total returns in the 4 percent to 6 percent range.

We also think interest rates will be on the move this year, expecting both short-term and long-term rates to increase. Fed Funds should end the year at 1 percent.

The moral to our economic story is slow and steady won’t be all bad on a relative basis. Our economy expanding at an approximate 2.1 percent pace will allow the Fed to normalize interest rates and companies will find a way to be profitable and continue to hire workers, supporting consumption.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.

UMB Investment Management is a division within UMB Bank, n.a. that manages active portfolios for employee benefit plans, endowments and foundations, fiduciary accounts and individuals. UMB Financial Services, Inc.*  is a subsidiary of UMB Financial Corporation. UMB Financial Services, Inc is not a bank and is separate from UMB Bank, n.a.

This content is provided for informational purposes only and contains no investment advice or recommendations to buy or sell any specific securities. Statements in this report are based on the opinions of UMB Investment Management and the information available at the time this report was published.

All opinions represent our judgments as of the date of this report and are subject to change at any time without notice. You should not use this report as a substitute for your own judgment, and you should consult professional advisors before making any tax, legal, financial planning or investment decisions. This report contains no investment recommendations and you should not interpret the statements in this report as investment, tax, legal, or financial planning advice. UMB Investment Management obtained information used in this report from third-party sources it believes to be reliable, but this information is not necessarily comprehensive and UMB Investment Management does not guarantee that it is accurate.

All investments involve risk, including the possible loss of principal. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Neither UMB Investment Management nor its affiliates, directors, officers, employees or agents accepts any liability for any loss or damage arising out of your use of all or any part of this report.

“UMB” – Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off. Copyright © 2016. UMB Financial Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Securities offered through UMB Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA, SIPC or the Investment Banking Division of UMB Bank, n.a.

*Insurance products offered through UMB Insurance Inc.

You may not have an account with all of these entities.

Contact your UMB Representative if you have any questions.

* Securities and Insurance products are:

Not FDIC Insured  ▪  No Bank Guarantee  ▪  Not a Deposit  ▪  Not Insured by any Government Agency  ▪  May Lose Value

 

 


K.C. Mathews joined UMB in 2002. As executive vice president and chief investment officer, Mr. Mathews is responsible for the development, execution and oversight of UMB’s investment strategy. He is chairman of the Trust Investment, Asset Allocation and Trust Policy Committees. Mr. Mathews has more than 20 years of diverse experience in the investment industry. Prior to joining UMB, he served as vice president and manager of the portfolio management group at Bank of Oklahoma for nine years. Mr. Mathews earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Notre Dame. Mr. Mathews attended the ABA National Trust School at Northwestern University and is a Chartered Financial Analyst and member of the CFA Institute. He is past president of the Kansas City CFA Society and a past president of the Oklahoma Society of Financial Analysts.



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Rising rental rates encourage homeownership

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The 2015 Rental Market Report conducted by Rent.com showed that rates for apartment units are likely going to continue to increase.

The 2015 Rental Market Report conducted by Rent.com showed that rates for apartment units are likely going to continue to increase. The survey gathered responses from more than 500 property managers in the U.S. to determine the current and forecast state of the rental market.

Rising rent encourages home buying

Rent will rise
According to the survey, 53 percent of property managers indicated they would prefer bringing in a new tenant and charging a higher rate over negotiating a lease renewal with a current tenant.

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In addition, the survey showed 88 percent of managers raised rent in the last year, and 68 percent of participants believe rates will continue to rise into the next year. Many expect rent to rise by an average of 8 percent, which is a 2 percent increase from the expected rent rise predicted in 2014.

The increasing cost of renting an apartment is turning many renters into interested homeowners, according to a recent survey done by TD Bank.

“Rising rents are motivating Americans to purchase a home,” said Scott Haymore, Head of Pricing and Secondary Markets. “With an improving job market and economy, renters are gaining more confidence in the housing market and starting to explore homeownership as a feasible option.”

Mortgages may be more appealing
Many current renters are seeing substantial increases in the rent they regularly pay, which is making them more interested in becoming a homeowner. The survey indicated the breaking point for many consumers deciding to transition from renting to buying is when their rent reaches $1,100 per month. The average monthly rent currently sits at $1,000 making the breaking point for many individuals very close.

Many renters have already experienced substantial increases in the rent they pay each month. More than 50 percent of respondents indicated their rents increased by nearly $300 in the past two years.

Rising rent was 47 percent of survey participants’ biggest motivators for purchasing new homes.

The American Dream
Owning a home is still a critical component to the American Dream. Almost 60 percent of consumers and 76 percent of millennials indicated it was “extremely” or “very important” to own a home in the TD Bank survey.

While 51 percent of respondents indicated money is the primary concern when it comes to purchasing a new home, the average surveyed renter was able to save more than $50,000 for a down payment, and 24 percent of millennials have saved $100,000. The ability to save is the true key to homeownership.

“We can see from our data that rents are rising, and while many renters feel that saving for a home is out of reach, there are other options they should consider,” said Haymore. “Today, potential buyers can take advantage of state and government affordability programs, which offer options outside the traditional 20 percent down payment. This enables them to pursue homeownership, build equity and still feel comfortable with their monthly payments.”

Saving for a down payment
Gathering the funds to save for a down payment on a new home requires dedication. According to Zillow, hopeful homeowners will want to first establish exactly how much money is needed to pay for the perfect house. Reaching out to a real estate professional will help to get a better idea of what the current local market looks like and whether buyers or sellers have the advantage.

In addition, contacting a mortgage lender can help an interested buyer figure out what can be expected from the entire lending process. If a consumer wants to secure a lower interest rate, he or she may want to provide a larger down payment.

Once it’s been decided how much is needed to invest in a new home, interested borrowers should examine their current spending habits. Budgeting downfalls can lead to issues when saving for a down payment, but fixing these issues will help hopeful homeowners reach their financial goals even faster.

Another way for interested buyers to build their savings for a new home quickly is by earning more cash to contribute to funds. Individuals can get a second job for a certain amount of time, or they can figure out a way to turn a favorite hobby into a profitable one using websites like Etsy or Facebook as a marketing platform.

Holding a garage sale is another way to increase savings and build a down payment fund. Decreasing the number of items that must be moved will also be beneficial when it’s time to pack everything up and relocate.

 

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The Overlooked Cleaner Energy Source for Home and Office: Ground Source Heat Pumps

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Everyone has heard the energy saving benefits of solar and wind power but did you know ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) can save you up to 45 percent on your energy consumption compared to conventional HVAC systems. How do we know this? Experience.  In 2004, UMB installed a vertical ground source heat pump system consisting of 12 wells at our branch location in Grandview, Mo. According to Roy Allen, who is part of the UMB maintenance team, the Grandview location saves approximately 21,000 kWh per month over similar sized banking center locations. With such great savings on energy UMB has decided to install a second system at another banking center as well. Construction for this new center should begin in February 2016.

energy

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In addition to saving energy and money GSHPs are good for the environment since they are a cleaner source of energy using mostly ambient heat from the ground while using very little electricity.

How Ground Source Heat Pumps Work
So how do these systems provide cleaner energy and help you save on your utility bills? Air temperature can fluctuate greatly with the seasons and even daily, with daytime highs and night time lows, but surprisingly ground temperature remains relatively constant. Conventional air-source HVAC systems attempt to capture heat from frigid winter air as well as disburse heat into the baking hot summer air – which is no easy task.  However ground source heat pumps work by capturing the neutral heat absorbed at the surface of the Earth, it then heats the air in the winter and then extracts the heat from inside air in the summer. This is done through a water solution that flows through pipes (wells) buried in the ground that circulates the heated water to the home/office in the winter and then it is reversed in the summer whereby the heat is extracted from the air and transfers it via water through the pipes removing the heat from the building and transferring it to the ground.

Types of Systems
There are four basic types of GSHPs including horizontal, vertical, pond/lake which are all closed loop systems. The fourth type is the open loop system. The option you choose is dependent on the climate, soil conditions and the available land. UMB banking centers utilize the vertical option. This option is used when soil is too shallow for trenching, it also does not require a lot of space. Roy explained the system only takes up a 70 ft. x 100 ft. space and contains 12 wells at a depth 500 ft. It is located under the drive through teller lanes. He said both the current and new systems, designed by Lankford Fendler and Associates, have life time warranties on the wells. Another benefit of the system is that it is very low maintenance.

So the next time you are looking for a cleaner energy source for your new home or office you may want to consider ground source heat pumps.

Sources:
http://energy.gov/energysaver/geothermal-heat-pumps
http://energyblog.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/17/10-myths-about-geothermal-heating-and-cooling/

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Ms. Shahane is a Vice President Healthcare Marketing/Sustainability Manager for UMB. She is responsible for managing marketing initiatives for UMB’s healthcare payments, HSAs, and benefit card products. In addition, she leads the UMB Green Team and promotes UMB’s internal sustainability initiatives. She joined UMB in 2001 and has 13 years of experience in the financial services industry. She earned a MA in Marketing from Webster University. She is a volunteer for Bridging the Gap and serves on the board for Northeast Neighbor to Neighbor.



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2015 economic forecast: ready for liftoff

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After several years of slow-growing momentum in the U.S. economy, we have deemed 2015 the year of economic “lift-off.”

Lift-off is a term the Federal Reserve (Fed) typically uses to reference a transition from lower rates to a rising rate environment. For our forecast this year, however, this term can actually be applied broadly to the entire U.S. economy, signaling that meaningful improvement has arrived and will likely continue. So what will fuel this economic lift-off, and are there any variables to consider that may cause us to reconsider whether or not the economy is truly ready for launch?

Check out KC’s interview with The Street to see a short summary of his predictions. For the full story, keep reading.

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Where we’ve been

reverse-liftoff

The United States has been stuck in a below potential, moderately-growing economy since 2009. Most recently, we saw 2.2 percent real or inflation-adjusted GDP growth in 2013 – followed by a small improvement to 2.4 percent growth last year. So it shouldn’t come as a surprise that we anticipate additional improvement in 2015; but will this be a low-altitude lift-off near 2.7 percent or something more powerful, closer to 3.1 percent growth?
economic growth

Fuel

The economy is fueled by many factors, but there are a few that carry more weight than others. If you are familiar with UMB, you’ll note that we are driven by what the data tells us, not by what people say; the goal being to understand the difference between the signal and the noise.

This year we think the primary driver of growth will be the consumer.  We think there will be three key variables to watch that should drive consumption and economic activity.
fuel

Jobs are one of the most telling and powerful variables in the economic formula. Most of the time, though, headline unemployment is the only data indicator used in reporting. We don’t think the value of that indicator is very significant. We prefer to hone in on actual job creation or payroll growth because it tells more of the story. The country has seen marked improvement in average monthly payroll growth since 2011, and with that, GDP has correlated nicely. In 2013, approximately 194,000 jobs were created per month (GDP at 2.2 percent); in 2014, the number was 246,000 (GDP at 2.4 percent) and we anticipate the labor market will stabilize or improve slightly, increasing to somewhere around 250,000 per month in 2015. Historically speaking, when the United States creates 3 million jobs a year, the economy grows faster than 3 percent.
unemployment

One of our favorite signals to forecast payroll growth is availability of credit. Businesses need to know credit is available prior to expanding and hiring workers.  Payroll growth and the willingness of banks to lend are highly correlated by as much as 85 percent.  Today banks are open for business and lending standards are accommodative.
unemployment

Consumer confidence has been improving and we think will continue to improve due to the labor market, stock and home prices, and of course lower energy costs. As we stated, the employment landscape is in excellent condition and on an upward trajectory. This adds to the formula for upward movement, along with a stock market that is up more than 200 percent over the last five years, home prices are up 30 percent over the last three years.  As I have said before, when consumers feel good, they consume. This certainly seems to be the case.
confidence

Credit makes the world go ’round, and banks and credit are the lifeblood of the economy. Unfortunately over the past few years, millions of Americans were cut off from credit but today will once again have access to credit. From 2006 – 2009 nearly 5 million Americans, roughly the population of metropolitan Atlanta, defaulted on their mortgages. When you default on a loan, you are cut off from credit. Fast forward seven years after a default and that blemish has been expunged from your credit record, thus giving millions of Americans access to credit once again. With that, demand for bank loans has improved significantly. In 2007 loan demand was growing just shy of 10 percent, then dried up during the Great Recession, and resurfaced to nearly 8.0 percent in 2014. In other words, consumers and businesses are willing to borrow and consume yet again.

Houston we have a problem…or do we? 

All indicators are telling us that things look positive, but as with any mission, we must explore possible hazards that could cause a ‘failure to launch.’ Let’s hone in on a few key variables:

Employment – Yes jobs have been created, but job quality has been in question for a few years. Now, though, we can see improvements. The national quit rate is on the rise, which tells us that employees are finding better paying employment.
employmentHousing – Household formation data typically follows the economic cycle. When economic conditions are favorable, young people can find jobs. They move out of their parents’ homes and create their own household, increase consumption and create housing demand.  Unfortunately, employment among the millennial generation (age 15-35) is incredibly low, indicating that many of them are unable to move out and create a household. Perhaps a more relevant group would be millennials aged 25-35, revealing that approximately 25 percent of them are not working, due to either unemployment or remaining in school. However, we feel confident that as the economy improves, this generation will have an easier time securing work, creating households of their own and thereby creating housing demand.  Housing has not made a significant contribution to GDP over the last several years. This year we think housing starts will reach 1.2 million and add close to 0.50 percent to real GDP, which will be material.
housingGeopolitical – The U.S. economy operates on a global scale and we always have to be mindful of the geopolitical risks that exist. Most recently, we’ve had to a take a close look at potential action coming from the European Central Bank, as Europe has been on the brink of a recession for some time now. In addition, Russia has been put in a difficult situation with the price of oil down nearly 50 percent. Russia has a losing hand as a country where 68 percent of its exports come from oil and gas. While this proves problematic for some countries overseas, non-oil producing countries, such as Europe and Asia, will have a boost of stimulus through lower oil prices. Overall, we mark this as a risk, but not particularly threatening to our forecast in the United States since consumers will have an estimated additional $100 -$150 million of disposable income.
geopoliticalPolicy Mistake – As previously mentioned, a Fed liftoff will occur when it begins to raise overnight rates up from the zero rate that’s been in place for several years.  This could be called a “policy mistake” if the Fed were to begin pushing rates up before the economy is healthy enough to handle higher borrowing rates.  We think that this is a very remote possibility, as inflation is still quite low and the Fed has little incentive to move rates up early or in a dramatic fashion.  In fact, the interest rate liftoff that we think will begin later in the year will actually be good news, because it will signal that the central bank sees a US economy that is healthy enough to withstand more normalized rates.  We think the Fed will move in a rational, measured manner that will not threaten the economic expansion.
policy mistakeCleared for Lift-Off – Through careful consideration of what factors are fueling our economy and what could pose a risk to launch, we believe the U.S. economy is officially ready for lift-off.
cleared for lift-off

Here’s what we anticipate for this year:

  • GDP growth between 2.7 percent and 3.1 percent, supported by a robust labor market as businesses create new jobs
  • Nearly 250,000 jobs created on average per month; this will drive unemployment down to 5.5 percent and many discouraged workers will return to the work force
  • Another good year in domestic equities
  • Corporate America will see 4.0 percent revenue growth and 6.0 percent earnings growth, which should lead to 10 percent total returns in the equity market
  • Interest rates will be on the move this year, expecting both short-term and long-term rates to increase

In all, the above data and research proves that the economy is certainly prepared for a lift-off. Whether we will see GDP near 2.7 percent or slightly more significant at 3.1 percent, the year ahead is looking brighter than we have seen for quite some time.
When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.

 

UMB Investment Management is a division within UMB Bank, n.a. that manages active portfolios for employee benefit plans, endowments and foundations, fiduciary accounts and individuals. UMB Financial Services, Inc.*  is a wholly owned subsidiary of UMB Bank, n.a. UMB Bank, n.a., is an affiliate within the UMB Financial Corporation.

This content is provided for informational purposes only and contains no investment advice or recommendations to buy or sell any specific securities. Statements in this report are based on the opinions of UMB Investment Management and the information available at the time this report was published.

All opinions represent our judgments as of the date of this report and are subject to change at any time without notice. You should not use this report as a substitute for your own judgment, and you should consult professional advisors before making any tax, legal, financial planning or investment decisions. This report contains no investment recommendations and you should not interpret the statements in this report as investment, tax, legal, or financial planning advice. UMB Investment Management obtained information used in this report from third-party sources it believes to be reliable, but this information is not necessarily comprehensive and UMB Investment Management does not guarantee that it is accurate.

All investments involve risk, including the possible loss of principal. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Neither UMB Investment Management nor its affiliates, directors, officers, employees or agents accepts any liability for any loss or damage arising out of your use of all or any part of this report.

“UMB” – Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off. Copyright © 2015. UMB Financial Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Securities offered through UMB Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA, SIPC or the Investment Banking Division of UMB Bank, n.a.

*Insurance products offered through UMB Insurance Inc.

You may not have an account with all of these entities.

Contact your UMB Representative if you have any questions.

Securities and Insurance products are:

Not FDIC Insured  *  No Bank Guarantee  *  Not a Deposit  *  Not Insured by any Government Agency  *  May Lose Value

 

 


K.C. Mathews joined UMB in 2002. As executive vice president and chief investment officer, Mr. Mathews is responsible for the development, execution and oversight of UMB’s investment strategy. He is chairman of the Trust Investment, Asset Allocation and Trust Policy Committees. Mr. Mathews has more than 20 years of diverse experience in the investment industry. Prior to joining UMB, he served as vice president and manager of the portfolio management group at Bank of Oklahoma for nine years. Mr. Mathews earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Notre Dame. Mr. Mathews attended the ABA National Trust School at Northwestern University and is a Chartered Financial Analyst and member of the CFA Institute. He is past president of the Kansas City CFA Society and a past president of the Oklahoma Society of Financial Analysts.



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