Blog   Tagged ‘legacy’

From 19 to Retirement…a look at a life-long UMB career

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A letter from Rosie, reflecting on her time at UMB:

Rosie

It’s hard to imagine how much has happened during the last 45 years of my time at UMB. I started at the age of 19, on July 17, 1968.

We now have UMB Bank branches in eight states; 112 branches total. I’ve worked for City National Bank, United Missouri Bank, United Missouri Bancshares Inc., UMB Financial Corporation, and UMB Bank, n.a—all the same organization, but with name changes over the years. With each name change, UMB has had six different logos, my favorite being the Indian Scout. What an accomplishment for me to be able to work for such a stable company.

With my first job, we didn’t have computers—a fact that is difficult for my two grown children to comprehend. I started in the Stock Transfer Department working on a posting machine. We actually had to type certificates for the new stockholders on manual typewriters! (After a few years we graduated to electric typewriters.) It’s hard to believe where we came from looking at us now, with all the modern technology UMB Bank has today.

While working at UMB Bank, I was able to meet each of the Kempers who were president or CEO. The first was Mr. R. Crosby Kemper, Sr. who officially retired shortly after I was employed by the bank. Then I met Mr. R. Crosby Kemper, Jr., Sandy Kemper, R. Crosby Kemper III and Mariner Kemper. I would encounter them on the elevators, and each one was so friendly. They thanked me for being part of the UMB family. I especially remember Mr. Kemper, Jr. buying his breakfast in the cafeteria and going to each of the tables to say good morning to everyone. I remember the famous Kemper smiles. They all seemed to have that same smile that reached out to everyone they saw or met.

Rosie and Mariner1

Mr. R. Crosby, Jr. was a big fan of the University of Missouri Tigers. I remember the day I went to the 928 Grand tellers and saw a huge, beautiful tiger in the lobby. Yes, a real tiger. Sometimes I wonder if I really saw that tiger or if it was just a dream, but some of my fellow co-workers also remember the “Tiger in the Lobby” day.

Umbert_Czar the Tiger_1973

In my time here, I witnessed the construction of the 1010 Grand UMB building in 1986 and the Technology and Operations Center in 1999. I saw old buildings being demolished, the resulting big hole in the ground, and then the new completed bank buildings that take up one square block. I loved being there for that history and now getting to tell my grandchildren about it.  Sometimes it pays to be old. You see so many things happen during your life.

As my 45 years are coming to a close, I look back upon a career that has really flown by. There have been ups and downs just like in life, and you become one big family.

I realize that soon I will not be seeing and greeting my work family. Over the years I have made a lot of friends, some gone, some still here and I get a little emotional because I will be leaving part of my family behind.

Once I retire, I will be volunteering for my church and Alexandra’s House, which provides perinatal hospice support, watching my grandchildren while they are out of school and trying to keep busy.

I am saying goodbye now and leaving you with these paraphrased words: “Live. Laugh a lot. It’s good for the soul. And last of all, love your job, because one day you too will be walking down the hallways for the last time.”

With fondest memories,
Rosie Corral

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Corral is an operations associate for UMB. She works in the settlement department, receiving and settling buys from brokers. She joined UMB in 1968 and has 45 years of experience in the financial services industry. She is retiring April 30 after a long career at UMB.

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The art of fine art management

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Have you ever watched Antiques Roadshow? This popular public television show shares interesting stories of people happily discovering their personal treasures are actually quite valuable (or sometimes not!). Imagine learning that a famous designer of the late 1800’s made your great-grandmother’s favorite lamp or a rare piece of pottery you purchased on vacation is actually a sought-after piece. Fortunately, you don’t have to appear on Antiques Roadshow to learn the value of your own pieces or how to protect and possibly increase their value. There are other ways that are more easily accessible.

The Red Couch Marie Mason“The Red Couch”
Acrylic on canvas
Marie Mason

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Many people spend their lives collecting items that not only bring them personal enjoyment, but may significantly increase in value over time. Whether it’s fine artwork, collectibles (baseball cards), memorabilia (original Beatles or Elvis merchandise) or rare objects (antiques), you should consider these items important personal assets. Much like stocks and bonds, they are an important part of a full estate plan. But people don’t always think of them in this way.

By working with trusted professionals, you can ensure that your valuable items will get the attention they need during your lifetime and beyond.

So, what steps should you take to preserve and protect your fine art or collectibles?

  • Identify and protect

    Find a fine art management expert who can help you identify items that should receive additional attention to help preserve, and in some cases, maximize their worth. This person can also provide counsel on valuation (or appraisal), insurance, storage and other very specialized services that may be important in maintaining the object’s value.

  • Organize and document

    Proper documentation and cataloguing is critical. An experienced professional can help record the history and provide a comprehensive inventory of all pieces, an important aspect in maintaining their value. In the same way a museum inventories their collection, an expert can provide the same level of service and system support for your fine objects. Your record can then be updated as pieces are added or removed so the inventory is always complete. A detailed account of each item, including where and how each piece was acquired, can make a significant difference in value, plus, it’s a fun history lesson for you and your heirs.

  • Plan for the unexpected

    It’s important that your estate plans include details of how you want these assets distributed. Will they be gifted to a museum, a family member or a non-profit? Will these objects be liquidated so the funds can be passed on to relatives, loved ones or charitable organizations? Who will you trust to handle the actual distribution? These processes can be complicated and confusing. Your fine art management expert can help address and carry out these plans.

It’s never too early to get started on protecting your valued unique assets. Owners have much to gain by educating themselves about the care and protection of their personal treasures. Establishing a thoughtful, well-planned legacy ensures beloved items will be expertly managed both now and in the future.

 Flaming Tulip Janet Kummerlein“Flaming Tulip”
Acrylic on canvas
Janet Kummerlein

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Jan Leonard is senior vice president and managing director for charitable trusts, private foundations and fine art services. She joined UMB in 2003 and has more than 25 years of experience in the management of private and public organizations. Leonard earned a bachelor’s degree from Arkansas Tech University and a master’s degree in business administration from Ottawa University in Ottawa, Kan. She is also a graduate of the Cannon School of Foundation Management.

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R. Crosby Kemper: Building a legacy through integrity and innovation

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R. Crosby Kemper discusses the legacy of integrity and innovation at UMB. He reflects on the company’s consistent strength and stability that comes from the idea of doing what is right instead of what is popular.

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For more of UMB’s history, take a look at “Our Stories” on umb.com.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.

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R. Crosby Kemper: Building a legacy through art and agriculture

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R. Crosby Kemper discusses the legacy of art and agriculture at UMB. He talks about his love of art and agriculture and the importance of both in the Kansas City metro and across the country.

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For more of UMB’s history, take a look at “Our Stories” on umb.com.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.

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