Blog   Tagged ‘loan’

Financial Word of the Week: Certificate of Deposit

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FWOTW

Certificates of Deposit (CDs) are a type of savings account that generally earns you a higher interest rate than other bank accounts because you are restricted from withdrawals or deposits. You are guaranteed to earn a set interest rate throughout the term of the CD.  Most institutions have CDs that range from 30 days to multiple years. If you do withdraw money from the account, you may have to pay early withdrawal penalties.

CDs were authorized in the 1960s and gained popularity during the inflation period of the 1970s because of their attractive rates. They are also insured under the Federal Deposit Insurance Company (FDIC) guidelines. Given today’s low interest rate environment, you may need to weigh the benefits of being locked into a term. If rates go up, you will be stuck in a low interest rate account or pay the penalties for early withdrawal.

Example
The highest average advertised rate on a one-year CD is 1.00% Annual Percentage Yield (APY). With that rate, it would take you 72 years just to double your money with compounding interest. Or more realistically, if you kept $1,000 in a CD for 10 years, you would only earn approximately $100 in interest. However, if you have a specific goal and time period you’re saving for, then a CD investment could make sense for you.

Next week we’ll explain how to ladder CDs and how it can help you.

 

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Financial Words of the Week: APY, annual interest rate and compound interest

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Ever notice that sometimes your interest rate has the letters APY next to it and sometimes you just see a percentage? What do those letters mean? More importantly, how does the difference affect the money you earn in savings and pay on a loan?

First of all, you need to know that compound interest comes from the money you earn on the interestyou’ve already earned. This is one of the many reasons you want to get the highest interest rates for your savings/investing and the lowest interest rate for your loans. It differs from simple interest which only earns interest on the principal balance.

Financial institutions should give you two quotes when you are asking about interest rates: the annual interest rate and the Annual Percentage Yield (APY).

The annual interest rate is the yearly rate you earn in an investment or pay on a loan and doesn’t factor in compound interest. The annual interest rate is what the account is currently earning and only involves simple interest.

Example: If your savings account has a balance of $10,000 and an annual interest rate (no compounding) of 1 percent, then here’s how you would calculate your earnings from one year:

                                $10,000 x 1% = $100 (after one year, your account balance would be $10,100)

Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is the similar to annual interest rate, but it does factor in compounding.  This can make a significant difference when it comes to investing and borrowing.  APY is what you’ll use when comparing rates for investment/saving options.

Example: If you put the same amount of money into a savings account that utilizes APY (compounding interest of 1 percent), here’s the formula you’d use assuming the interest is compounded twice a year:

                                           $10,000 x (1 + .01/2)2 = $10,100.25 (balance after one year)

While the above examples show insignificant differences – did we really take the time to explain all this for a 25 cent difference? – the larger your interest rates and deposit  balances are, the more impact APY vs. annual interest rate will make. Remember, compound interest is your friend when you’re saving or investing and your foe when you’re taking out a loan or using a credit card.

 

 

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Financial Word of the Week (Small Business Month): Collateral

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Collateral is a company’s assets that are pledged to ensure payment of a financial obligation. Collateral can include business or personal assets such as equity in your home. Business collateral typically includes equipment, inventory, vehicles and accounts receivable. As we explained in our post about the “Five Cs of Credit” (one of which is collateral), you may be required to sign a guarantee with the promise to repay the loan if you cannot repay it with the profits from your business.

Sometimes a Small Business Administration (SBA) loan could be used if there is a collateral short fall within the organization.  An SBA loan has other requirements as well.

A company must understand that the collateral they put up for a loan could be seized if a company defaults on a loan. Also remember that most lending institutions require your collateral value to be more than the loan amount.

 

 

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Financial Words of the Week: Back to School – Joint Accounts & Online Banking

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Back to School Series

When a high school graduate moves away from home, an adjustment period inevitably follows. Paying bills, maintaining jobs and making sure their checking accounts remain positive, can cause college freshmen and new-to-the-work-force employees to struggle with finding a balance.

Whether you’re in this situation yourself or you have a child who is adapting to this new life, opening a joint checking/savings account and online banking can be helpful tools for a smooth transition.

Many banks offer free accounts for college and high school students that do not charge a monthly fee for maintaining an account. The minimum balance requirements are often more flexible since many students don’t have the income to satisfy typical account requirements. By opening a joint account, a parent or guardian can easily track spending and transfer money.  One of the best ways to do this is by utilizing online and mobile banking, which is free at most banks. You can see full transaction history and statements, transfer money from one account to the next, or see how much you have saved … all from your computer or smart phone. Many banks even have options for those who do not have smart phones that utilize text messaging commands.

By working together with your family’s bank, you can ensure you and your student have the right foundation for great educational and fiscal responsibility.

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Financial Words of the Week: Back to School – Student Loans / FAFSA

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Back to School Series

There are different types of student aid that come from various sources. Aid can be in the form of grants (money that is not required to be paid back) that come from schools, private organizations or even from the state and federal government. Some students enter work-study programs that allow them to earn money towards their education as another type of aid. The most common form of aid comes from student loans.

Student loans are funds that are made available for students and guardians to pay for education expenses. It is important to note that, like all other loans, student loans are required to be paid back. However, many student loans offer a deferment period that eliminates the need for payments while a student is in school. There are some loans that are subsidized, so that while a student is in school, the loans don’t accrue interest that the student will have to pay. The federal government is actually paying that interest, not the student.  There are also unsubsidized loans in which the interest accrues while the student is still in school. There still may be the option to utilize in-school deferment, but the interest adds up the entire time the loan exists.

Sometimes it can be difficult to know where to start and which form of aid you may be eligible for. That is where Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) comes in. The FAFSA is a form developed by the federal government that helps determine what types of aid students qualify for. Most colleges require that you complete the FAFSA when applying for financial aid. Visit FAFSA’s websiteto find out more details.

Remember to also work with a bank partner or trusted financial advisor, your high school guidance counselor and your college admissions office to understand if there are any additional resources for your education expenses.

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Financial Word of the Week: Back to School – Co-Signer

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Back to School Series

You have probably heard the phrase, “You need to have credit to get credit.” It can be difficult for someone starting out with no credit to establish a record. One way to overcome this hurdle is to have a co-signer on a loan or revolving line of credit.

A co-signer is a person who also promises to pay the debt. A co-signer is often used when the original applicant has no credit or “poor” credit. Having a more credit-worthy applicant ensures that the creditor, in most cases the bank, has more protection because there is a second person to pay the debt.

The co-signer is responsible for the loan payments. This includes all past and future payments not yet made as well as any additional late fees or penalties. Additionally, co-signers can have their credit impacted if payments are not made on time, so weigh all of the options before agreeing to be a co-signer.

Parents of college students often co-sign for an auto loan or small credit card. By having a low-limit credit card or a small auto loan, students can build good payment history to establish credit with little risk to their parents.

Whether student, co-signer or just a single applicant, one thing is certain – it takes a long time to build credit and a short time to negatively impact it. We always recommend borrowing and paying responsibly to ensure you have access to funds you need. If you’re considering co-signing a loan or credit card, it’s important to first make sure that you can make the monthly payments in full before you make your decision.

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Financial Word of the Week: Debt-to-Income

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Last week we explained what Loan-to-Value meant, specifically with mortgages. Now it’s time to tackle another important ratio: Debt-to-Income (DTI).

Your DTI ratio tells lenders how much of your income goes towards your debt and is another number you want to be low. Lenders will look carefully at your DTI ratio, along with your credit score, LTV, and other factors when considering you for a loan. You should aim for a DTI ratio of approximately one third (or lower).

How to calculate

Add up all of the debt payments you make each month (mortgage, student loans, vehicle loan, outstanding credit card balance, etc.). Then divide it by your gross monthly income (pre-tax). So if you make $50,000/year or $4167/month and have $1,500 in debt to pay each month, your DTI would be $1,500 ÷ $4,167 = 36%.

If you’re thinking of buying your first home, calculate how much house you can afford with this calculator, but also factor in how much debt you already have.

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UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Financial Words of the Week: Fixed Rate / ARM

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Previously, we defined interest  as the cost of borrowing money. You have a range of options when it comes to interest rates. Before you take out a new loan or credit card, be sure you understand those options.

When looking at mortgages, you will likely see fixed rate and adjustable rate mortgages. With a fixed rate mortgage, your lender sets the interest rate during the application process, and it does not change for the life of the loan. With an adjustable rate mortgage, your interest rate will change regularly, based on a published reference rate. The frequency of this change depends on your mortgage.

Loans other than mortgages can be either fixed rate or variable rate. The definition of a fixed rate loan is the same as a fixed rate mortgage, but variable rate loans differ from adjustable rate mortgages in how frequently the rate can change. If the reference rate changes frequently, the interest rate on a variable rate could change monthly. Many car loans have fixed rates, while most credit cards have variable rates.

If you are unsure what your interest rate is on an existing loan, you can look at the terms and disclosures on your monthly statement or your loan paperwork. If you are applying for a new loan or line of credit, the application disclosure should tell you how the interest rate is set.

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UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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2nd step to buying a home—choosing the right loan for you

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So you’re ready to buy a home, and have finished the first step of pre-approval. Did you know that nearly half* of home purchases are from your fellow first-timers? It can be a daunting process, so we’re continuing the step-by-step approach to help you navigate this important financial decision.

There are many home loan choices. Finding the right lender will be the key to obtaining the information you need to make the right decision. The pre-approval process should have uncovered many of the factors that determine which loan will work best for you and let you know what interest rate you might be paying. Remember, to get a good interest rate, you’ll need as high a credit score and down payment as possible. The right lender will be able to guide you and explain the differences in each of the loans you qualify for.

Here is a general discussion of some of the mortgage loans available, to help prep you for your first meeting with a potential lender. The main differences are the size of the down payment and whether the interest rates can change.

Types of mortgage loans:

Conventional vs.Non-Conventional– One of the first decisions you will discuss with your lender is whether you want a conventional or non-conventional loan, which often depends on the size of your down payment.

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Conventional - A conventional loan typically requires a minimum down payment of 5 percent.  If you put down 5 to 19 percent, private mortgage insurance (PMI) may be required. This insurance protects the lender if you do not repay your mortgage.  Typically, you’ll have to pay this insurance until 78-80 percent of your mortgage is left, and then you may be able to remove PMIfrom your payments.  To avoid that extra insurance from the beginning, you’ll typically have to put down 20 percent or more.

Most first-time buyers choose homes with a median value of $147,000*, but in case you’re wondering, the conventional loan limit in most areas is $417,000. These loans can be fixed or adjustable (more on that in a minute). Conventional loans also allow you to have the seller pay up to 3 percent of your home’s closing costs and prepaid taxes and insurance.

FHA (non-conventional) – FHA loans typically require lower down payments than conventional mortgages, but there are also drawbacks to them. For example, FHA loans require mortgage insurance up front and it is usually more than private mortgage insurance with a conventional loan. Here’s how this type of loan works: The Federal Housing Authority does not actually lend the money but insures 100 percent of what the lender funds. FHA loans tend to be the most flexible in their credit guidelines. They usually allow for lower credit scores, higher debt-to-income ratios and as little as 3.5 percent as a down payment. These loans allow for up to 6 percent seller-paid closing costs and prepaid taxes and insurance.

Veterans Affairs (VA) – The VA loan was designed to offer long-term financing to eligible American veterans or their surviving spouses (provided they do not remarry). The VA loan does not require a down payment and does not require monthly private mortgage insurance.

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) – This loan is intended to help people purchase homes in rural areas. The property must be located within the USDA Rural Development Home Loan footprint. USDA loans offer 100 percent financing to qualified buyers and allow for all closing costs to be either paid for by the seller or financed into the loan.

Fixed vs. Adjustable Rate Mortgages – After choosing a conventional vs. non-conventional loan, it’s time for another decision: do you want a fixed or adjustable rate?

Fixed-Rate Mortgages – Fixed-rate loans are just that, loans that have interest rates that are locked-in for the term of the loan. This means that your rate will not change during the entire time that you have the loan. Keep in mind that even with a fixed interest rate your payment could vary based on changes in taxes or insurance. The repayment of the loan is also spread out, or amortized, over that same fixed period. You can choose from 10-, 15-, 20-, 25- and 30-year fixed rates. Generally, the shorter the term of the loan, the lower the rate, but also the higher the payment. For example, a 15-year loan will usually have a better interest rate than a 30-year loan, but you’ll have to pay more per month in order to get the mortgage paid off sooner. Therefore, choosing the fixed-rate period will be a large part of determining the amount of your monthly payment.

Adjustable Rate MortgagesThese loans typically allow you to have lower payments at the very beginning, but take on higher risk than fixed-rate loans. There is usually an initial time period (1 to 10 years) where the interest rate is fixed. However, the rate can change after the initial fixed period causing the monthly payment to go up. Be sure to talk to your lender about what type of loan is best for your situation. If any of these factors apply to you, your lender can explain in more detail how an adjustable rate mortgage would work for you. However, an adjustable rate may be a good option if:

  • you plan to sell in a few years,
  • you will pay off the loan early, within the next few years, or
  • interest rates are high right now and are anticipated to decrease in the coming years. (not the case today)

To avoid feeling overwhelmed, remember, your lender is there to walk you through everything. Instead, focus on what your needs are. Then, you can outline with your lender what you’re looking for so he or she can provide your best options.

Arrive at your first lender meeting with answers to the following questions:

  • How much will you have for a down payment?
  • What are your preferred neighborhoods?
  • Do you want to get your loan paid off as soon as possible even if it means higher payments, or do you need lower payments with more time to pay it off?

Choosing the right lender is just one part of your home-buying team. Adding an experienced realtor will save you time and money and will be discussed in step three of buying a home.

*statistic source: NAHB.org

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.




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Financial Word of the Week: Secured Loan and Collateral

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What is a secured loan?

The word secured brings to mind images of armored trucks and locked vaults. Both can guard cash and valuables, but not a loan.

A secured loan is a loan in which the borrower pledges property (e.g. a car, house or other property) to the lender to act as a source of repayment if the borrower cannot pay back the loan.  The property that is pledged is called collateral.  If you do not make the payments as required on the loan, the lender may sell the collateral to cover the amount owed.  Usually a lender will require security for high dollar loans or when your credit is not good enough.

The opposite of a secured loan is an unsecured loan, which does not require collateral.  A lender may give you an unsecured loan when the borrower’s credit history is strong and the amount loaned is for lesser amounts.  Most credit cards are unsecured loans.

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So what does this mean for me?

Secured loans can help you make large purchases and pay them off over time. If everyone had to save for the full purchase price of a house, most people could not afford to be a homeowner until middle age, if ever. Because of the security provided by collateral, banks can provide lower cost credit options through secured loans. Your first step before borrowing should be to do a financial checkup (stay tuned for next week’s blog post to learn more about that) and figure out if you’re financially ready for that large purchase.

 

Statistics Source: New York Fed Household Credit Quarterly Report

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.

 

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UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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