Blog   Tagged ‘malware’

Cyber security: 10 tips for protecting your mobile device

  |  Posted by

Your mobile device provides convenient access to your email, bank and social media accounts. Unfortunately, it can potentially provide the same convenient access to criminals. As we continue National Cyber Security Awareness Month, remember to always follow these tips from the American Bankers Association in conjunction with the Stop.Think.Connect. campaign to keep your information – and your money – safe.

protect your mobile

  1. Use the passcode lock on your smartphone and other devices – This makes it more difficult for thieves to access your information if your device is lost or stolen.
  2. Protect your phone from viruses and malicious software just like you do for your computer by installing mobile security software.
  3. Use caution when downloading apps – Apps can contain malicious software, worms, and viruses. Beware of apps that ask for unnecessary “permissions.”
  4. Download the updates for your phone and mobile apps. These contain valuable security patches and fixes for vulnerabilities.
  5. Avoid storing sensitive information like passwords or a social security number on your mobile device.
  6. Be aware of shoulder surfers – The most basic form of information theft is observation. Be aware of your surroundings especially when you’re punching in sensitive information.
  7. Wipe your mobile device before you donate, sell or trade it using specialized software or using the manufacturer’s recommended technique. Some software allows you to wipe your device remotely if it is lost or stolen.
  8. Beware of mobile phishing – Avoid opening links and attachments in emails and texts, especially from senders you don’t know. Be wary of ads (not from your security provider) claiming that your device is infected.
  9. Watch out for public Wi-Fi – Public connections aren’t very secure, so don’t perform banking transactions on a public network. If you need to access your account, try disabling the Wi-Fi and switching to your mobile network.
  10. Report any suspected fraud to your bank immediately.

Next week we’ll share 10 tips to protect yourself online to wrap up National Cyber Security Awareness Month.

 

Continue Reading

Source: American Bankers Association

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Matheys serves as senior vice president and Director of Corporate Information Security & Privacy, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and has 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) and member of the International Association of Privacy Professionals.



Leave a Comment

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , ,

We regret to inform you that your account has been compromised…now what?

  |  Posted by

You can do everything right to secure your personal information, but your credit or debit card information can still be compromised. Unfortunately, retailers and restaurants can be victims of hackers just like individuals can. Except when an identity thief breaches a retailer’s point of sale (POS) system, more than one person is affected. The company’s system can hold hundreds, if not thousands, of card numbers and key card security details including card verification value (CVV) codes.

CVV Code

 

Exact location of the CVV number varies among the card brands. Consult your card’s instructions for the location of your card’s CVV code.

Continue Reading

 

 

Throughout a given year, you have a chance of having your information stolen in one of these security breaches. Reportedly 44.8 million records were breached in 2012. Companies continue to ramp up security measures and while they do a good job, the hackers find points of vulnerability and use malware to pull the credit/debit card information.

Fast food restaurants and small business systems are the most targeted. The high level of transactions makes fast food restaurants a prime target. Small businesses are usually targeted because they don’t always have the same robust security resources as bigger companies, but even large national retail chains can be a victim of these security issues.

When there is a security compromise at retailer or restaurant, it should not end up costing you any money. Your bank should take care of everything, from issuing you a new card and personal identification number (PIN) to recovering any lost funds.

Smart ChipThe current risk environment will not notably change until smart cards (also known as chip cards) are rolled out universally in the U.S. We should see this by the end of 2015. The chip card is different from the card with the magnetic stripe because there is a small microchip in the card with a dynamic security code continually changing, making it extremely difficult to counterfeit.

As a consumer, you have little control over these external events, but this shouldn’t stop you from using your credit/debit cards. You can help protect yourself, by regularly checking your online bank statements and taking advantage of any fraud alerts through SMS texting and emails offered by your bank. At the very least, check your paper statements each month for any suspicious activity. If you regularly monitor your accounts, you will be able to spot fraudulent activity and your bank can quickly fix the issue.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Hanson serves as vice president and fraud manager in Card Operations. He is responsible for providing fraud detections, prevention, and investigation services to UMB’s credit and debit card customers. He joined UMB in 2010 with more than 15 years of credit card fraud prevention experiences. He earned a Bachelor of Science in political science from the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah and a Master of Arts in national security affairs from the Naval Post-Graduate School in Monterey, Calif.



Read One Comment

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,