Blog   Tagged ‘National Cyber Security Alliance’

What you don’t know can scam you: 4 tips to help you be more cyber secure

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A UMB associate recently shared a story with me about his mother-in-law who joined Facebook to keep up with friends and family. She received a friend request from a widowed, retired serviceman around her age and the two developed a friendship. The gentleman asked if she could send money to help him come for a visit. What she didn’t know was that he was a social engineer‡. Her family and local law enforcement were eventually able to convince her that she had been part of a Facebook romance scam‡, but not before she lost nearly $60,000. Sadly, stories like this are more common‡ than you might imagine, and the threat is real. In this video, you’ll see how phishing scams and social engineering takes shape and what you can do to prevent being lured into one.

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Every year, cyber criminals become more sophisticated and harder to stop. We already know consumers globally lost $158 billion to cybercrime in the past year, and in the United States alone, the figure is nearly $30 billion. As technology continues to change, so does the way criminals try to get your personal information to commit fraud. While we are committed to providing helping customers stay secure year-round, we try to make special notice of it during October’s National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM)‡.

NCSAM is designed not only to bring online threats to the forefront, but also to help individuals take better care of their online information. So how can you protect yourself, your family and your electronic devices?
NCSAM
Keep a clean machine

  • Links that you have received that are still stored in emails, social media direct messages and other online communications may be used to try and phish your personal data. A compromised email gives access‡ to sent email conversations revealing detailed information on you including  attachments you may have forgotten to delete.  Make a plan to move suspicious message to your Junk Email folder and to check your disable links and warnings feature in your email settings.
  • Did you know memory sticks‡ and other external devices (like phones and tablets) can be corrupted and give your computer what they’ve been infected with? Use antivirus software to scan them too.

Protect your personal information

Get the kids involved – Online gaming

Online gaming can be a fun way for kids to connect with others, but it’s important for them to understand the risks, to know how to handle certain situations. My son was recently the victim of a social engineer while gaming online. He took the bait from someone he thought was a new friend and lost a bunch of virtual currency – that was purchased with real dollars, and while that was disheartening (especially since I thought I’d taught him plenty about social engineering), it could have been even worse. Talk with your kids about:

  • Malicious users posing as “site administrators”
  • Never sharing account names and passwords – which allow the fraudster access to mom or dad’s credit cards
  • Buying fake virtual goods
  • Always using the legitimate site for the game. Never engage in transactions outside of the site.

Know that your mobile devices are targets too

  • Most of your mobile devices (smartphone, wearable technology‡, tablet and even laptop) contain significant information like contact numbers, photos, location and more. It’s important you treat your personal information in these like its valued currency.
  • Connecting to public wifi hotspots‡ that are not secure could be harmful. Avoid using these especially when logging into email or financial accounts.

For more tips you can use to keep your home and office safe online, visit StaySafeOnline.org‡.  In addition, you can visit UMB’s Security and Privacy page to help you stay current on security best practices as well as see how we’re working to protect you.

security-resource-page

Remember, while you can’t prevent every attempt at cyber crime, you can take steps to prevent and respond quickly if it does happen.

 

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Be safe, secure & informed

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Banking, socializing, shopping online and downloading apps make life more convenient and help us stay connected. But that convenience also gives cybercriminals more opportunity to take over our email and bank accounts, and infect our computers or steal our identities. Did you know consumers globally lost $158 billion to cybercrime in the past year? In the United States alone, the figure is nearly $30 billion. These cybercriminals are becoming savvier and sophisticated, making it even more important for you to know how to stay safe and secure online.

We want to do our part in helping you stay informed when it comes to online banking. That’s why we recently created our Security and Privacy Resource Center where you can go for tools and resources to help protect yourself online.

Go to the Security and Privacy Resource Center>>

UMB Security Resource Center

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You can use the Security News & Alerts section to help you stay up-to-date on the latest in cybersecurity and best practices. Here are even more resources and guidance on staying safe:

  • How UMB protects you: explains our strong commitment to your security and details of how we protect you when using our digital products.
  • How to protect yourself: provides you with best practices for mobile devices and other online activity.
  • Preventing identity theft: describes how identity theft occurs, steps to prevent identity theft and what to do if you become a victim of identity theft.
  • Privacy notice: provides you our most current detailed privacy notice.
  • Protect your business: provides our small business customers with 10 common security practices and resources for reducing security risk and the likelihood of fraud as well as information about popular fraud schemes such as the Business Email Compromise (BEC).
  • Report fraud: provides you a quick list of how to report fraud for:
  • ATM, debit card, or checking fraud for business or personal accounts
  • Credit card fraud
  • Identity theft
  • Suspicious phishing emails

We hope this provides you useful and meaningful information that you can use in our ever evolving digital world.  

Be sure to bookmark the Security and Privacy Resource Center so you can easily check back for updates to this new and expanded content.

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Tis’ the Season for Tax Fraud

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IRS tax refund scam tips

It’s tax time. As you prepare your taxes or eagerly await any refunds, it’s also time to be aware of tax scams. These scams include phishing emails, texts or phone calls that may warn of a delay with your return, promise a bigger refund or offer you a “helpful downloadable document.” These scams are designed to steal your refund, bank account information or identity by compelling you to provide your private information to the scammer.

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The IRS estimates that it paid $5.2 billion in fraudulent refunds as a result of identity theft last year. This year, in light of recent data breaches, individuals are urged to be especially careful. New scams offer credit monitoring services due to a breach or claim to be from popular tax software providers. The IRS has provided a list of The Dirty Dozen Tax Scams for 2015 to help keep us up to date on the latest scams.

In addition, be particularly aware of common tax season phishing emails like these:

  • You’re owed a refund and need to forward your bank account information for the refund deposit. The IRS does not initiate taxpayer communications through email or social media to request personal or financial information. If you receive an unsolicited email claiming to be from the IRS, send it to phishing@irs.gov.
  • Exciting offers or refunds for participating in an “IRS Survey.” This fake survey is actually used to acquire private and confidential information that is used to steal your identity.
  • Threats of fines or jail time for not making an immediate payment, or responding to the email. If you receive an intimidating email like this and even believe you might owe on taxes, contact your local IRS office and report the threatening email.
  • Documents or tools for tax preparation (e.g. “new changes in the tax law,” a tax calculator, etc.). Those “helpful” documents mentioned earlier may, in fact, be malicious files intended to infect your computer. Remember not all unsolicited email is legitimate. If you need current tax information, go to the IRS website or consult with a tax professional.

Scams don’t stop with phishing emails. Here are some helpful tips if you get calls or texts from someone pretending to be from the IRS:

  • If you know you owe taxes or think you might owe, call the IRS at 800-829-1040.
  • If you know you don’t owe taxes or have no reason to believe that you do, report the incident to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) at 1.800.366.4484 or at gov.
  • If phone scammers target you, also contact the Federal Trade Commission. Use their FTC Complaint Assistantto report the scam, and include “IRS Telephone Scam” to the comments of your complaint.

Remember, identity theft doesn’t stop at tax season so exercise your “spidey sense” with any email, unsolicited text or call asking for your personal information.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Learn how to prevent identity theft on Data Privacy Day

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Data Privacy Day

A whopping 9 out of 10 adults feel they have lost control over how personal information is collected and used by companies.* With tools at your fingertips allowing you to instantly share and receive online, your private information flows through the internet often without you giving it a second thought. Instead of sending you off with no electronics to rough it in the mountains just so you can protect your privacy, these stats should inspire you to expand your identity theft know-how and step up your privacy game.

I’d like to invite you to join UMB in participating in Data Privacy Day 2015.  Be one of the 6 in 10 Americans who are ready to do more to protect their personal information online.* Here are a few ways you can reduce your digital footprint, protect your privacy and prevent identity theft:

  • Think before you give out your Social Security number, first pet or mother’s maiden name. Does the business or website really need it? Could you use another piece of information?
  • Read the Privacy Policy. You may be surprised where your favorite online retailer or social media site shares your information. Here is UMB’s Privacy Statement.
  • Know how to update your privacy settings. Use these simple instructions on how to update privacy settings on Facebook, Pandora, email, internet browsers, mobile devices and more.
  • Review your bank and credit card statements regularly for unauthorized transactions. Use custom mobile banking alerts to monitor your accounts.
  • Check your credit reports. Every 12 months, you can get a free copy of your three reports at AnnualCreditReport.com.
  • Share with care. Consider the future and not just the moment with anything you post or share online. Once the information is in cyberspace it could be seen, stolen and used.

Celebrated on January 28, Data Privacy Day is an international effort centered on bringing attention to the importance of privacy, safeguarding data and enabling trust. Find out more about Data Privacy Day from the National Cyber Security Alliance.

 

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*Source: http://staysafeonline.org/stay-safe-online/resources/privacy-tips-for-2015-infographic

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Join the movement: National Cyber Security Awareness Month

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In a world where our thirst for computers, smartphones, gadgets and Wi-Fi seems to have no limits, cyber security has become more important than ever. At home, at work and at school, our growing dependence on technology, coupled with increasing threats to our online safety and privacy, demands greater security in our online world.

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At UMB, we’re proud to take strides towards a safer, more secure cyberspace. In doing so, UMB has joined the National Cyber Security Alliance, Anti-Phishing Working Group and Department of Homeland Security in support of National Cyber Security Awareness Month in October. The Stop.Think.Connect. campaign was launched in 2010 as a national public awareness campaign aimed at increasing the understanding of cyber threats and empowering the American public to be safer and more secure online. Consider it a neighborhood watch for your computer. However, just like security in your neighborhood, this campaign can only be successful when people get involved.

Through this national campaign, UMB has teamed with public and private sector resources as well as the U.S. federal government to help improve cyber security. According to the Stop.Think.Connect. campaign, they strive to:

  • Increase and reinforce awareness of cyber security, including associated risks and threats, and provide solutions for increasing cyber security.
  • Communicate approaches and strategies for the public to keep themselves, their families and their communities safer online.
  • Engage the public, the private sector, and state and local governments in our nation’s effort to improve cyber security.

Cyber security is a shared responsibility. I invite you to join UMB in the cyber security movement during National Cyber Security Awareness Month. Do your part by visiting umb.com and the Stop.Think.Connect. resource page to learn more about how to protect yourself online and help make cyberspace a safer place for all cyber citizens.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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