Blog   Tagged ‘online’

Is Amazon the new Christie’s?

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Would you like to add a Norman Rockwell original to your shopping basket? Well, now you can.

Amazon recently launched a new platform where you can purchase fine art just like you would buy toys, books or laundry detergent on their site. On Amazon Art, you can choose from a wide array of options in price, artists and quality.

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Buying art online

 

 

Research on internet art purchasing shows that online sales tend to be in the $5,000 and under price range and are usually the works of living artists with or without a significant resume. Online buyers also tend to view their pieces as more decorative versus a long-term investment.

 

 

 

There are both benefits and drawbacks to buying fine art online. If you’re thinking about purchasing a piece of art from an online source, consider these benefits:

  • Easy access to more artists: The online option increased the market for sellers by providing an inexpensive, easily-accessible platform and fronting with a brand name.
  • Pick your price point: Sites now offer options that range from $20 to $4 million, so there is something for everyone. With a broader selection of pieces, you will be able to stick to a price point that fits your budget.
  • Customized shopping: Some sites are very user-friendly and give you the option to shop by color, price, size, etc. These sites will only continue to evolve, which will force all players to keep improving their online customer experience to be competitive.

On the flip side, there could be some risk to buying art online:

  • Value risk: Basically, are you getting what you paid for? This is something to think about because there may not be an opportunity to verify authenticity or provenance (or origin) before buying a piece.
  • Transactional risk: Depending on the online seller or site, there may not be a guarantee to return a piece you purchase if you learn it’s not authentic, is misrepresented, etc.
  • Lack of References: Check references before buying a significant piece. Call the gallery directly or arrange to view the piece on site.  While we encourage this practice, you may or may not have this option depending on the online seller.
  • Hidden Costs: You may also encounter added expenses, such as shipping, handling, administrative fees or insurance.

When you look for your next piece of art, keep your options open and these tips in mind. If you are thinking about buying a significant piece, you may find traditional shopping methods are best.  But if you’re interested in looking online, there are many options to choose from ­– just remember to proceed with caution.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Jan Leonard is senior vice president and managing director for charitable trusts, private foundations and fine art services. She joined UMB in 2003 and has more than 25 years of experience in the management of private and public organizations. Leonard earned a bachelor’s degree from Arkansas Tech University and a master’s degree in business administration from Ottawa University in Ottawa, Kan. She is also a graduate of the Cannon School of Foundation Management.



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Join the movement: National Cyber Security Awareness Month

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In a world where our thirst for computers, smartphones, gadgets and Wi-Fi seems to have no limits, cyber security has become more important than ever. At home, at work and at school, our growing dependence on technology, coupled with increasing threats to our online safety and privacy, demands greater security in our online world.

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At UMB, we’re proud to take strides towards a safer, more secure cyberspace. In doing so, UMB has joined the National Cyber Security Alliance, Anti-Phishing Working Group and Department of Homeland Security in support of National Cyber Security Awareness Month in October. The Stop.Think.Connect. campaign was launched in 2010 as a national public awareness campaign aimed at increasing the understanding of cyber threats and empowering the American public to be safer and more secure online. Consider it a neighborhood watch for your computer. However, just like security in your neighborhood, this campaign can only be successful when people get involved.

Through this national campaign, UMB has teamed with public and private sector resources as well as the U.S. federal government to help improve cyber security. According to the Stop.Think.Connect. campaign, they strive to:

  • Increase and reinforce awareness of cyber security, including associated risks and threats, and provide solutions for increasing cyber security.
  • Communicate approaches and strategies for the public to keep themselves, their families and their communities safer online.
  • Engage the public, the private sector, and state and local governments in our nation’s effort to improve cyber security.

Cyber security is a shared responsibility. I invite you to join UMB in the cyber security movement during National Cyber Security Awareness Month. Do your part by visiting umb.com and the Stop.Think.Connect. resource page to learn more about how to protect yourself online and help make cyberspace a safer place for all cyber citizens.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Matheys serves as vice president and information security and privacy officer, providing oversight of UMB’s formal information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) as well as Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Wait a minute…who’s been sending emails from my account?

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Did you know every day thousands of webmail accounts (Gmail, Yahoo, AOL, etc.) are taken over by cyber criminals? Compromised webmail can be used to make purchases, transfer money from bank accounts or even trick friends and family into giving out information that allows access to their webmail – in a matter of minutes.

Take time to do a few simple things to ensure your webmail accounts are as secure as possible:

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Passwords

Weak passwords can be easily hacked and used to access your account.

  • Avoid using the same password on numerous accounts. This may make your email vulnerable if another site is compromised.
  • Change your password often.
  • Use strong passwords. For example, think of a special phrase and use the first letter of each word as your password. For more tips, visit OnGuardOnline.gov

Security Questions

Even a strong password can be compromised if security questions are easy to guess.

  • Make sure answers can’t be researched on social media sites.
  • Pick a question that only you know the answer to.
  • Choose the custom security question option if available.

Phishing Email

Phishing scams use a convincing message to trick you into clicking a link, downloading attachments or other “bait” that can be used to log your online activity, give a cyber criminal control of your computer or even direct you to a phony website where you’re asked to enter your username and password. All of these can be used to commit online crimes. To avoid phishing scams:

  • Look for misspellings or grammatical errors.
  • Question suspicious email; don’t click questionable links or download attachments that appear out of the ordinary, even if from a friend or company you’re familiar with.
  • If you aren’t sure, OnGuardOnline.gov provides help for identifying phishing scams.

Review Account(s)

The best protection against cyber crime is staying alert.

  • Check sent, trash, and other folders for suspicious incoming or outgoing mail.
  • Check advanced account options for changes you didn’t make. Your email may be forwarded to someone else and you didn’t even know it.
  • Investigate security options offered by your provider like notices for suspicious log-in attempts or two-step verification using a code that’s texted to your phone.
  • Regularly review financial accounts associated with your email address for suspicious activity.
  • Contact your bank and all other financial institutions immediately if you think your email has been compromised.

Don’t fall victim to cyber crime. Take time to secure your webmail accounts and encourage friends and family to do the same.


Ms. Matheys serves as vice president and information security and privacy officer, providing oversight of UMB’s formal information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) as well as Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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