Blog   Tagged ‘scam’

The Anatomy of a Romance Scam

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It’s important to be wary of scammers looking to use emotion to get you out of your comfort zone and convince you to reveal personal information. Unlike other scams that happen solely online, romance scammers have also been known to call their victims. These types of scams are also known as catfishing.

Romance scammers will go to great lengths to gain your interest and trust, showering you with compliments, sharing what appears to be details about their life and emphasizing what you have in common. This process may take months as the scammer goes to great lengths to make the target fall in love.

Warning signs:

  • Their profile on the dating website or Facebook page is not consistent with what they tell you. For example, the images they use don’t match how they describe themselves, or they say they are university educated but their English is poor.
  • After gaining your trust, they tell you an elaborate story and ask for money, gifts or your bank account/credit card details.
  • They don’t keep their promises and always have an excuse for why they can’t travel to meet you and why they always need more money.
  • If you don’t send money straight away, their messages and calls become more desperate, persistent or direct. If you do send money, they continue to ask you to send more.
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Protecting yourself:

  • When you meet someone online, always consider the possibility that s/he could be a scammer – particularly if any of the warning signs are present.
  • Perform a Google image search‡ of the individual who contacted you to see if the images consistently match to the name and aren’t featured on unusual websites.
  • If you agree to meet with an individual in person, always tell family and friends where you are going and how long you’re going to be away. Meeting in a public place is another way to protect yourself.
  • Be wary of money requests. Never send personal information that could be used to open up credit cards or accounts in your name, and carefully consider the possibility of a scam before you agree to give anyone money.

For more tips, visit StaySafeOnline.org‡, or visit UMB’s Security and Privacy page to help you stay current on security best practices.

romance scam infogrpahic

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Phishing Alert and “Heartbleed” security issue

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Did “Heartbleed” affect UMB?

“Heartbleed” is a bug that has affected many popular websites and “could have quietly exposed your sensitive account information (such as passwords and credit card numbers) over the past two years,” according to Mashable.com.‡

None of UMB’s computer systems were impacted by the Heartbleed bug.

As soon as these hackers were exposed, UMB took immediate action. We were able to find that none of our banks were vulnerable to this issue. We also added specific, proactive monitoring. Although UMB was not affected by the issue, our customers do need to be cautious since the bug could still harm you through other websites where you saved your card numbers or used the same password you use for online banking.

What action do customers need to take?

  • Change your passwords – If you utilize the same password for your online banking services that you utilize on other sites, we strongly recommend that you change the password for your online banking services immediately, in case your username or password were compromised on another site.
  • As always – use different passwords for all online services which contain personal or financial information.
  • To find out if other password-protected sites you use were compromised, we recommend contacting those website providers directly. They may advise to wait to change your passwords until they have installed the latest fixes to this Heartbleed bug, but the only way to know for sure is to receive information from those specific sites.
  • If you run a website and need advice on how to protect it, we recommend visiting Heartbleed.com.‡

Phishing Alert

phishing scam

Some of our customers may have received text messages yesterday or today that we identified as a phishing attempt. The message states that there has been a security breach and gives a number to call. If you call the number, it will ask you for your credit card number or account information. Do not respond to this request for information.

What you need to know:

  • UMB will NEVER contact you via text, email or phone for the purpose of requesting any kind of personal or bank information.
  • Phishing scams are common. These attacks use e-mail or malicious websites to solicit personal, often financial, information. Attackers may send e-mail seemingly from a reputable credit card company or financial institution that requests account information, often suggesting that there is a problem. When users respond with the requested information, attackers can use it to gain access to the accounts.
  • Check out some more Security FAQs from our security experts.

What you need to do:

  • Never respond to suspicious messages or click on suspicious links.
  • Check with your financial institutions before sharing any type of private or financial information.
  • Remember to use online and mobile banking. Why?
    • Secure (protected by multiple layers of security)
    • Saves time – quick access from any computer anywhere
    • Hinders identity theft – if you check your accounts frequently, potential fraud is discovered early.
  • Already a mobile banking user? Here are some tips:
    • Save UMB’s short code (50106) in your address book as a Contact, so that when you receive a Text/SMS message from us, you will know immediately that UMB has sent you a communication.
    • Make sure you know who has sent you any message – if in doubt, delete it.
    • Never click on any links if you are not sure of the sender.
    • Never send any confidential information to anyone – the bank will never ask you to “go here and fill in this information” or “please send us this information.”
    • The bank will also never ask you to respond with your password unless you are signing into one of our applications.
    • Never respond to a request for your password and alert us immediately should you receive a message requesting your password or any other confidential information at 888-782-4325. You may contact us Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. or on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a diversified financial holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking services, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arizona and Texas, as well as two national specialty-lending businesses. Subsidiaries of the holding company include companies that offer services to mutual funds and alternative-investment entities and registered investment advisors that offer equity and fixed income strategies to institutions and individual investors.



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