Blog   Tagged ‘student loans’

Financial Words of the Week: Back to School – Student Loans / FAFSA

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FWOTW

Back to School Series

There are different types of student aid that come from various sources. Aid can be in the form of grants (money that is not required to be paid back) that come from schools, private organizations or even from the state and federal government. Some students enter work-study programs that allow them to earn money towards their education as another type of aid. The most common form of aid comes from student loans.

Student loans are funds that are made available for students and guardians to pay for education expenses. It is important to note that, like all other loans, student loans are required to be paid back. However, many student loans offer a deferment period that eliminates the need for payments while a student is in school. There are some loans that are subsidized, so that while a student is in school, the loans don’t accrue interest that the student will have to pay. The federal government is actually paying that interest, not the student.  There are also unsubsidized loans in which the interest accrues while the student is still in school. There still may be the option to utilize in-school deferment, but the interest adds up the entire time the loan exists.

Sometimes it can be difficult to know where to start and which form of aid you may be eligible for. That is where Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) comes in. The FAFSA is a form developed by the federal government that helps determine what types of aid students qualify for. Most colleges require that you complete the FAFSA when applying for financial aid. Visit FAFSA’s websiteto find out more details.

Remember to also work with a bank partner or trusted financial advisor, your high school guidance counselor and your college admissions office to understand if there are any additional resources for your education expenses.

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Financial Word of the Week: Revolving Credit vs. Installment Loans

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FWOTW

Ever been in a meeting with your banker or a cocktail party conversation where a financial term stumps you? Are you considering buying a house or want to plan for the future, but have no idea where to start? Well, look no further. We’d like to be a resource for you and to make all that financial jargon easier to understand. And by the time you’ve read a few of these, the added bonus will be impressing your friends with your new financial wit!

So now, we bring you the perfect (and easy) way to increase your financial knowledge.

What is the difference between revolving credit and installment loans?

Many forms of debt fall into one of two categories: revolving credit and installment loans. When you borrow money from a bank, you can choose to borrow a certain amount and pay it back in a set number of months (in installments) with an installment loan. Or you can choose revolving credit where you do not have a set end date. Instead, these accounts have a credit limit, which is the most you can borrow. At any time, you can use your credit line up to that maximum amount. As you make your monthly payments, your line becomes available again, if you need to use it. By contrast, an installment loan pays out only once at the beginning of the loan, such as a one-time purchase, and cannot be used again as you pay it down.

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So what does this mean for me?

You have choices when you need to borrow money. Some customers enjoy the flexibility of revolving credit options, like a home equity line of credit (HELOC) or credit card. Others prefer the fixed terms and certainty associated with an installment loan. As we will discuss over the next few weeks, different lending options have different criteria, different benefits and different costs.  The most important thing to remember is that a loan or line of credit should fit your budget. Different accounts have different payment options, allowing you to choose a payment plan that works for you.

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UMB Financial Corporation (Nasdaq: UMBF) is a financial services holding company headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., offering complete banking, payment solutions, asset servicing and institutional investment management to customers. UMB operates banking and wealth management centers throughout Missouri, Illinois, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Arizona. It also has a loan production office in Texas. Subsidiaries of the holding company include mutual fund and alternative investment services groups, single-purpose companies that deal with brokerage services and insurance, and a registered investment advisor that manages the company's proprietary mutual funds and investment advisory accounts for institutional customers.



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Paying off student loans doesn’t have to be a life sentence

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Picture yourself graduating from college. You may have landed a great job and moved into your own apartment. Or maybe you’re getting some work experience with an unpaid internship and you’ve moved back in with your parents for a few years. You may also have close to $30,000 in student loan debt that you feel like you’ll be paying off for the rest of your life.

You’re not alone. Before you go off to college, you might want to consider alternatives to student loans. Many people realize too late that they can’t afford the debt from their college expenses. Tuition, room and board, books and other costs over four or more years add up quickly. Not to mention if you choose to pursue an advanced degree.

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Student loan delinquencies in the U.S. are rising quickly. Student loan debt is also on the rise. The average student loan debt was $17,233 in 2005. In 2012, it had climbed to $27,253, an increase of more than 58 percent in just seven years.

Student Loan Delinquencies
Information from research done by FICO Labs

This debt increase combined with a slowly recovering economy has created an unstable situation; one that’s leading many to default on their student loan payments.

You might think defaulting on a loan isn’t a big deal. But, when you default on a loan, your credit rating drops and it’s more difficult to get approval for new credit. It’s a vicious cycle and it’s only getting worse. As more people default on their student loans, more of the population has lower credit scores, less access to credit and less opportunity to help grow the economy.

But this doesn’t mean you should skip college and go straight to working full-time. Student loans aren’t the only option to help pay for education. You do need to be prepared though. Don’t wait until you’re a senior in high school to start thinking about the following options:

  • Research scholarships and grants. As opposed to loans, students don’t have to pay back these types of financial aid.
  • Once you’re accepted to a school, research the least expensive options for non-tuition expenses (used books, on-campus housing, meal plans, etc.).
  • Get involved in the process so you can learn valuable financial lessons for the future. If you’re involved in the process from the start, you will have a better understanding of how to manage your money after college.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Mr. Stone serves as vice president, financial center manager and is responsible for leading the execution of sales and client experience within the financial center. He joined UMB in 2005. Stone earned a Bachelor of Science in Management from Baker University in Baldwin, Kan.



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