Blog   Tagged ‘Wi-Fi’

What you don’t know can scam you: 4 tips to help you be more cyber secure

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A UMB associate recently shared a story with me about his mother-in-law who joined Facebook to keep up with friends and family. She received a friend request from a widowed, retired serviceman around her age and the two developed a friendship. The gentleman asked if she could send money to help him come for a visit. What she didn’t know was that he was a social engineer‡. Her family and local law enforcement were eventually able to convince her that she had been part of a Facebook romance scam‡, but not before she lost nearly $60,000. Sadly, stories like this are more common‡ than you might imagine, and the threat is real. In this video, you’ll see how phishing scams and social engineering takes shape and what you can do to prevent being lured into one.

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Every year, cyber criminals become more sophisticated and harder to stop. We already know consumers globally lost $158 billion to cybercrime in the past year, and in the United States alone, the figure is nearly $30 billion. As technology continues to change, so does the way criminals try to get your personal information to commit fraud. While we are committed to providing helping customers stay secure year-round, we try to make special notice of it during October’s National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM)‡.

NCSAM is designed not only to bring online threats to the forefront, but also to help individuals take better care of their online information. So how can you protect yourself, your family and your electronic devices?
NCSAM
Keep a clean machine

  • Links that you have received that are still stored in emails, social media direct messages and other online communications may be used to try and phish your personal data. A compromised email gives access‡ to sent email conversations revealing detailed information on you including  attachments you may have forgotten to delete.  Make a plan to move suspicious message to your Junk Email folder and to check your disable links and warnings feature in your email settings.
  • Did you know memory sticks‡ and other external devices (like phones and tablets) can be corrupted and give your computer what they’ve been infected with? Use antivirus software to scan them too.

Protect your personal information

Get the kids involved – Online gaming

Online gaming can be a fun way for kids to connect with others, but it’s important for them to understand the risks, to know how to handle certain situations. My son was recently the victim of a social engineer while gaming online. He took the bait from someone he thought was a new friend and lost a bunch of virtual currency – that was purchased with real dollars, and while that was disheartening (especially since I thought I’d taught him plenty about social engineering), it could have been even worse. Talk with your kids about:

  • Malicious users posing as “site administrators”
  • Never sharing account names and passwords – which allow the fraudster access to mom or dad’s credit cards
  • Buying fake virtual goods
  • Always using the legitimate site for the game. Never engage in transactions outside of the site.

Know that your mobile devices are targets too

  • Most of your mobile devices (smartphone, wearable technology‡, tablet and even laptop) contain significant information like contact numbers, photos, location and more. It’s important you treat your personal information in these like its valued currency.
  • Connecting to public wifi hotspots‡ that are not secure could be harmful. Avoid using these especially when logging into email or financial accounts.

For more tips you can use to keep your home and office safe online, visit StaySafeOnline.org‡.  In addition, you can visit UMB’s Security and Privacy page to help you stay current on security best practices as well as see how we’re working to protect you.

security-resource-page

Remember, while you can’t prevent every attempt at cyber crime, you can take steps to prevent and respond quickly if it does happen.

 

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Cyber security: 10 tips for protecting yourself online

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Did you know that one in eight Internet users (or 378 million adults) became victims of cybercrime last year according to a Norton Cybercrime Report? Instead of avoiding the Internet – a nearly impossible task – make an effort to smarten up your online habits with our new Online Security Resource Center coming in November and these 10 ways to keep you safe on the Internet:

protect yourself online

  1. Keep your computers and mobile devices updated – Having the latest security software, web browser and operating system are the best defenses against viruses, malware and other online threats. Turn on automatic updates so you receive the newest fixes as they become available.
  2. Set strong passwords with at least eight characters in length and a mix of upper and lowercase letters, numbers and special characters.
  3. Use different passwords for every account – It may be easier to remember one password, but if the password and email address you use for one account gets in the hands of the wrong person, they will start trying it on other sites and services.
  4. Think before you click – Be vigilant about the links you click in an email, especially when they come from companies. Don’t click on odd Facebook messages with links. If your friend is sending the email, make sure it sounds like the person you know; otherwise his or her account could have been compromised.
  5. Watch out for phishing scams that use fraudulent emails and websites to trick users into disclosing private account or login information. Do not click on links or open any attachments or pop-up screens from sources you are not familiar with. Report phishing emails to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).
  6. Keep personal information personal – Hackers can use social media profiles to figure out your passwords and answer those security questions in the password reset tools. Lock down your privacy settings and avoid posting things like birthdays, addresses, mother’s maiden name, etc. Be wary of requests to connect from people you do not know.
  7. Secure your Internet connection – Always protect your home wireless network with a password. When connecting to public Wi-Fi networks, be cautious about what information you are sending over it.
  8. Shop securely online – Avoid sending payment information or credit card numbers through email. Make sure all personal information transactions are done on a secure site. When shopping online, only use trusted, secure websites. And before providing any personal or financial information, make sure the address bar changes from an “http” to an “https” address and includes a yellow padlock logo to the right of the Web browser address bar. The “s” stands for “secure,” and if you double-click on the yellow padlock logo, you’ll see a digital certificate for the website. When shopping online, use credit cards, not debit cards. This will minimize the damage in the event of a compromised account.
  9. Read the site’s privacy policies – Though long and complex, privacy policies tell you how the site protects the personal information it collects. If you don’t see or understand a site’s privacy policy, consider doing business elsewhere.
  10. Pay attention – It might seem obvious, but remember to keep your eyes open any time you’re using an Internet service.

Be sure to read the rest of our advice on protecting your mobile device and the ways cyber criminals try to steal your information.

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Source: American Bankers Association

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Cyber security: 10 tips for protecting your mobile device

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Your mobile device provides convenient access to your email, bank and social media accounts. Unfortunately, it can potentially provide the same convenient access to criminals. As we continue National Cyber Security Awareness Month, remember to always follow these tips from the American Bankers Association in conjunction with the Stop.Think.Connect. campaign to keep your information – and your money – safe.

protect your mobile

  1. Use the passcode lock on your smartphone and other devices – This makes it more difficult for thieves to access your information if your device is lost or stolen.
  2. Protect your phone from viruses and malicious software just like you do for your computer by installing mobile security software.
  3. Use caution when downloading apps – Apps can contain malicious software, worms, and viruses. Beware of apps that ask for unnecessary “permissions.”
  4. Download the updates for your phone and mobile apps. These contain valuable security patches and fixes for vulnerabilities.
  5. Avoid storing sensitive information like passwords or a social security number on your mobile device.
  6. Be aware of shoulder surfers – The most basic form of information theft is observation. Be aware of your surroundings especially when you’re punching in sensitive information.
  7. Wipe your mobile device before you donate, sell or trade it using specialized software or using the manufacturer’s recommended technique. Some software allows you to wipe your device remotely if it is lost or stolen.
  8. Beware of mobile phishing – Avoid opening links and attachments in emails and texts, especially from senders you don’t know. Be wary of ads (not from your security provider) claiming that your device is infected.
  9. Watch out for public Wi-Fi – Public connections aren’t very secure, so don’t perform banking transactions on a public network. If you need to access your account, try disabling the Wi-Fi and switching to your mobile network.
  10. Report any suspected fraud to your bank immediately.

Next week we’ll share 10 tips to protect yourself online to wrap up National Cyber Security Awareness Month.

 

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Source: American Bankers Association

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Cyber security: 10 ways cyber criminals try to steal information

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Did you know that 378 million adults were victims of cyber crime* and more than 13 million consumers suffered from identity theft** in 2013? October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month, and just as in previous years, we’ve joined other organizations, including the Department of Homeland Security to support the Stop.Think.Connect. campaign to help the American public better understand cyber threats and ways to be more safe and secure online.

This month, we’ll be bringing you a series of tips to help you stay safe when banking online, starting with today’s:

Capture

  1. Phishing – Phishing is a form of social engineering that uses a sense of urgency, personalization (often gleaned from information found on social media) or masquerades as a legitimate business to convince victims to provide information like bank account numbers, online banking user IDs and passwords or credit card information.
  2. Malware – Malicious software has evolved into stealthy, complex arsenals that are widely used and easily accessible to experienced cyber criminals and novice identity thieves alike. Malware can attach to browsers, steal keystrokes to send back to the attacker or intercept security codes on mobile devices – all of which can be used to steal your information.
  3. Email hijacking – You’ve all seen this one, even if you didn’t have a name for it. Remember when you received odd emails from your friends (which you hopefully deleted), later to get a frantic message from them saying “I was hacked!” Cyber criminals are able to hijack email accounts by guessing passwords, using phishing techniques or installing malware on the victims’ computers. Once they have access to your email account, the cyber criminal may be able to gain access to online banking or social media accounts. They may even begin emailing your contacts requesting money or account information, making you an unwilling accomplice to cyber crime.
  4. Mobile devices – Did you know that your mobile device is no different than your desktop or laptop computer when it comes to malware? Your mobile device can be infected just as your desktop or laptop would. In addition, mobiles devices can be easily lost or stolen. Once a device is obtained, the content of your device, browsing history, account IDs and passwords, may be accessed by the thief. In some cases, malware can even be planted on the stolen device and returned to obtain additional data. We’ll be bringing you more tips specific to your phone later this month.
  5. Eavesdropping – “Sniffing” is a common word used for searching out potential eavesdropping victims. One of the easiest places to sniff is an open Wi-Fi (Wi-Fi networks that don’t require a password) such as hotels, coffee shops and sporting arenas. Once a target is identified, cyber criminals can easily intercept personal or financial information being transmitted over the open Wi-Fi network. Cyber criminals will also set up their own unsecured Wi-Fi connection to lure unsuspecting victims.
  6. Online gaming –Playing games online can often involve a social network and customizable content requiring downloads or computer updates. These can be used to phish for personal or financial information or infect systems with malware. In many cases, online gaming accounts are tied to payment information as well.
  7. Drive-by downloads – It’s easier than you realize to become infected by malware. A drive-by is malware that is automatically downloaded to your computer or device. These downloads occur without your knowledge and don’t require you to click a file, button or link to begin. These infections can be delivered simply by viewing a website, checking an email or clicking a pop-up window.
  8. Merchant breaches – As we’ve seen in the news lately, these breaches occur when a merchant’s security system is compromised. Capable hackers are able to crack the security of the merchant and access large volumes of card or account data. This information can then be sold to create new cards for fraudulent use or commit other financial crimes.
  9. Pretext Calls – One of the oldest tricks in the book is the telephone scam. These veteran social engineers call posing as computer technicians offering to help update your computer, remove a virus or sell you software. Once they’ve established a rapport with the victim, they can ask for credit card or bank account information or direct them to a website to download malware.
  10. Dumpster diving – Believe it or not, this is still a common method of identity theft that happens when thieves go through garbage in search of financial statements, receipts and letters with personal information. Surprisingly, some people still toss personal data in the trash can rather than using a shredder or shred bin.

Next week, we’ll bring you 10 tips for protecting your mobile device.

 

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Sources: Buzz Hilestad, Principal Consultant Partner, Secure Healthcare Solutions

*American Bankers Association
**Javelin Strategy

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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Join the movement: National Cyber Security Awareness Month

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In a world where our thirst for computers, smartphones, gadgets and Wi-Fi seems to have no limits, cyber security has become more important than ever. At home, at work and at school, our growing dependence on technology, coupled with increasing threats to our online safety and privacy, demands greater security in our online world.

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At UMB, we’re proud to take strides towards a safer, more secure cyberspace. In doing so, UMB has joined the National Cyber Security Alliance, Anti-Phishing Working Group and Department of Homeland Security in support of National Cyber Security Awareness Month in October. The Stop.Think.Connect. campaign was launched in 2010 as a national public awareness campaign aimed at increasing the understanding of cyber threats and empowering the American public to be safer and more secure online. Consider it a neighborhood watch for your computer. However, just like security in your neighborhood, this campaign can only be successful when people get involved.

Through this national campaign, UMB has teamed with public and private sector resources as well as the U.S. federal government to help improve cyber security. According to the Stop.Think.Connect. campaign, they strive to:

  • Increase and reinforce awareness of cyber security, including associated risks and threats, and provide solutions for increasing cyber security.
  • Communicate approaches and strategies for the public to keep themselves, their families and their communities safer online.
  • Engage the public, the private sector, and state and local governments in our nation’s effort to improve cyber security.

Cyber security is a shared responsibility. I invite you to join UMB in the cyber security movement during National Cyber Security Awareness Month. Do your part by visiting umb.com and the Stop.Think.Connect. resource page to learn more about how to protect yourself online and help make cyberspace a safer place for all cyber citizens.

 

When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s website and go to websites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other websites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.


Ms. Flores serves as senior vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, providing oversight of UMB’s information security and privacy programs. She joined UMB in 2010 and more than 15 years of experience in information technology and information security. She attended Kansas State University with a focus on management information systems and is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).



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