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How to Observe National Cyber Security Month: A week-by-week guide

We lead connected, digital lives. From our desks and homes to on-the-go, we work, learn and play online. Even when we’re not directly connected to the internet, it impacts us because our critical infrastructure is built and supported online, from financial transactions, transportation systems, and healthcare records, to emergency response systems and personal communications. It’s critical that we understand how to protect our online experience.






National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) – observed every October – was created as a collaborative effort between government and industry to ensure Americans have resources to help them be safer and more secure online.

2018 marks the 15th anniversary of NCSAM. Over the next several weeks, I’d like to invite you to use NCSAM resources to become more cyber aware and to share the information – via social media or the dinner table – with others to help spread awareness.

Week 1: Oct. 1–5: Make Your Home a Haven for Online Safety

Easy-to-learn life lessons for online safety and privacy begin with parents leading the way. Today, family members use the internet to engage in social media, adjust the home thermostat or shop for the latest connected toy. With this everyday use, it is vital that the entire household ‒ including children – learn to use the internet safely and responsibly and that networks and mobile devices are secure.

Week 2: Oct. 8–12: Millions of Rewarding Jobs: Educating for a Career in Cyber security

Week two of NCSAM will focus on ways to motivate parents, teachers and counselors to learn more about the cyber security field and how to best inspire students and others to seek fulfilling cyber security careers. Take advantage of opportunities to educate students of all ages – from high school, higher education and beyond – on cyber security jobs as they consider their career options. In addition, veterans and individuals who are looking for a new career or re-entering the workforce should explore available positions in the industry.

Week 3: Oct. 15–19: It’s Everyone’s Job to Ensure Online Safety at Work

No matter where you work – whether it’s at a corporate office, local restaurant, healthcare provider, academic institution or government agency ‒ you share in the responsibility for your organization’s online safety and security. Week three will focus on cyber security workforce education, training and awareness while emphasizing risk management, resistance and resilience.

Week 4: Oct. 22–26: Safeguarding the Nation’s Critical Infrastructure  

Our day-to-day life depends on the country’s 16 sectors of critical infrastructure, which supply food, water, financial services, public health, communications and power, along with other networks and systems. A disruption to this online-operated system can have significant and even catastrophic consequences for our nation. Week four will emphasize the importance of securing our critical infrastructure and highlight the roles the public can play in keeping it safe.

For more information on NCSAM, and to find additional resources, visit the Stay Safe Online NCSAM page or the Stop. Think. Connect. Own Your Online Presence page.

Content adapted from The National Cyber Security Alliance‡ resources.

Learn more about protecting your business with basic security tips to keep yourself, your customers and your business safe online by visiting UMB’s Information Security Homepage.graphic line break

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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s Web site and go to Web sites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other Web sites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.