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How to protect against elder financial fraud

As technology becomes more prevalent in our society, an increasing variety of unique attacks are appearing. Whether it’s a phone call from someone posing as their grandchild asking for money or an email scam from someone in another country offering them investment opportunities, fraudulent financial scams are causing thousands of elderly Americans to lose money every year.






Steven Thornburg, senior vice president, senior regional deliver manager at UMB Bank, recently spoke with the Denver Business Journal about the rising concern of elder financial fraud in America. He also wrote a guest column about the topic to educate and protect your family’s financial future. Read about the tips he shared below to learn how to protect yourself and your loved ones against elder fraud. 

3 Ways to Protect Against Elder Financial Fraud

A little extra education and vigilance can go a long way.

According to the AARP Public Policy Institute, one in five elderly Americans are victims of financial exploitation each year. The continued development of technology is making these attacks more frequent, sophisticated and believable. Whether it’s a phone call from someone posing as a grandchild asking for money or an email scam from a so-called expert in another country offering investment opportunities, fraudulent financial scams are causing thousands of elderly Americans to lose their hard-earned money every year.

To protect yourself and loved ones against elder fraud, consider these three tips.

Avoid Unknown Emails

An easy way for scammers to gain access to your financial information is through a virus on your computer, so avoid clicking on links from email addresses that are not familiar. A scammer might also try to pose as a financial institution in an email. If this happens, call your bank or financial partner first to confirm that they sent a message before providing any financial information over email.

Verify Phone Calls

A scammer can also call and pose as a grandchild in need of money in an emergency. Before transferring funds or running out and buying gift cards, confirm with your family that the suspected grandchild is in danger. Even if the scammer says to not tell anyone else, if a member of your family claims to be in danger, double check before withdrawing or transferring thousands of dollars.

Name Another Joint Agent

Another effective way to protect against financial fraud is to have an additional family member listed as a joint agent on financial accounts. This way, before large sums of money are transferred or withdrawn, another family member must sign off.

As technology and fraudsters’ schemes continue to evolve, it can be challenging to stay one step ahead which is why it’s important to have a trusted financial partner. Ask your bank or financial advisor whether they’re up-to-date on fraud prevention training and what specific measures they take to protect the elderly. A little extra education and vigilance can go a long way in helping keep our elderly friends and family from becoming victims of financial fraud.

Stay informed on industry trends and noteworthy company news by visiting our UMB in the News section on umb.com or following UMB on LinkedIn, Facebook‡ and Twitter‡ to see regular updates about our company, people and timely financial perspectives.
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When you click links marked with the “‡” symbol, you will leave UMB’s Web site and go to Web sites that are not controlled by or affiliated with UMB. We have provided these links for your convenience. However, we do not endorse or guarantee any products or services you may view on other sites. Other Web sites may not follow the same privacy policies and security procedures that UMB does, so please review their policies and procedures carefully.